Peach Mango

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MaxTheSpy

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Hello Everyone! I brewed a Peach Mango mead for the first time, I've brewed tonnes of other meads before but never Peach and Mango. I tried it for the first time and its about 10% ABV Right now and is absolutely delicious. I thought I would share my Recipe with you all. It makes 1 gallon.

Ingredients: Total $9.75
  • 3LBS Wildflower Honey (Oregon Local) - $5.00 USD
  • 1/2 Pack Red Star Premer Blanc - $0.75
  • 1 Can Del Monte Peach Slices in 100% Juice (No fresh peaches available) - $2.50
  • 1 Mango 2/3 mango only, 1/3 mango slices with Skin - $1.50

Steps
  1. Heat Honey on low heat with some spring water (Oregon Local Fresh Water Spring)
  2. Add fruit to the carboy
  3. Add warm honey mixture to Carboy, Let sit with fruit and stir while warm.
  4. Let honey and fruit mix cool, Add more water until nearly full
  5. Shake Must
  6. Add yeast to carboy and shake 3 minutes.

Notes:
  1. SG: 1.11 (Mostly Accurate)
  2. Added yeast nutrient on day 2 and 5.
  3. Released gas by lightly stirring every day.

Let me know if any of you try this and how it turned out! Would love to hear from you.
 
OP
MaxTheSpy

MaxTheSpy

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Did you use the juice from the peaches as well as the fruit?
I used the juice as well yes, Its aging still but Ive had it aging for a month or two by now and Its still cloudy, I think it has something to do with the mango in it. I dont know what happened but something is "off" about it
 

NeverDie

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I used the juice as well yes, Its aging still but Ive had it aging for a month or two by now and Its still cloudy, I think it has something to do with the mango in it. I dont know what happened but something is "off" about it
Mango skin sounds dubious.
 

Blacksmith1

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Depending on the type of mango (there are at least 20 varieties) the skins can add color and possibly tannins.
IMG_20190403_221409.jpg a couple months back some one on the forum asked about the skins and I told them that I'd skip them as no one I know eats the skins. Well that may have been bad advice as no one eats banana skins or orange peels or several other fruit coatings that are regularly used in wines and meads.
I am about to start a brew with the mangos in the picture, skins included. In about a year I'll be able to tell you if it was a bad call.
 

S-Met

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I am about to start a brew with the mangos in the picture, skins included. In about a year I'll be able to tell you if it was a bad call.
Read up on traditional wine making. Skin and seed contact times play a big part in so many ways. Tannins, flavor and color are big, but not just contact. When (fermended vs juice) and how long also affect the end product.
 

S-Met

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What do you mean by this? Not sure what the contact reference refers to. Cheers
Great question.
These articles on wine might help explain.
https://www.google.com/amp/s/winefolly.com/review/winemakers-red-wine-secret-extended-maceration/

https://winemakermag.com/technique/1282-white-wine-skin-contact

Keep in mind these are grapes. Some things will be relevant, others wont. I did two lemon wines one year. 1/2 sat on zests for two weeks before fermentation and two weeks before transferring to secondary off of the zest while the other wine was onl juice.
The wine with the zest had a deep yellow hue and a much more depth of flavor. The juice only wine was simple and flat in flavor. Not nearly as enjoyable.
 

MiBeerMan

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After my peach mango cider I made using juice from old orchard, I must say this is one of my favorite drinks. I can't imagine using the real stuff. I have some looza peach juice along with some wildflower honey that might turn into a gallon batch this next weekend. This peach concentrate has 38g of sugar so I may not need all the honey. I'm thinking maybe adding peach slices in secondary on this. It's making my mouth water just thinking about this. Or hell, I may say screw it and do the 3 gallon version . Does anybody see problems with doing a 3 gallon version in a 5 gallon carboy. It would actually be a little more than 3 but not much
 

MiBeerMan

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So the peach juice I got is actually a 33 ounce drink from concentrate. I bought 3 of them. Would it be possible to use these 3 and fill the carboy up to the 3 gallon mark with water along with the honey.
 

Blacksmith1

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So the peach juice I got is actually a 33 ounce drink from concentrate. I bought 3 of them. Would it be possible to use these 3 and fill the carboy up to the 3 gallon mark with water along with the honey.
Yes. I would think it should be about the same as using fruit in your mead. Not quite the same as a peach cyser (I know, no such thing) more of a peach melomel.
 

Blacksmith1

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I'm wondering how much pulp was in those juices. That looks like a lot of lees. It can't be all yeast. I would try straining it to save as much liquid as possible.
 

MiBeerMan

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It's mostly the pulp. Both juices were very cloudy and good bit of sediment at bottom. I haven't added any fining agents and I really don't wont to but I will if anyone thinks it would help.
 

Blacksmith1

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you might consider a 75 micron brew bag to catch it on the first pour. you can then squeeze the bag to get most of the juice.
 

MiBeerMan

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How would you do this? Just strain it with the brew bag while racking it? I probably should have done this with the original juice to begin with. I bought some dried apricot chips from aldi the other day and was going to throw some in carboy once this cleared up.
 
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NGD

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Depending on the type of mango (there are at least 20 varieties) the skins can add color and possibly tannins.
View attachment 620449 a couple months back some one on the forum asked about the skins and I told them that I'd skip them as no one I know eats the skins. Well that may have been bad advice as no one eats banana skins or orange peels or several other fruit coatings that are regularly used in wines and meads.
I am about to start a brew with the mangos in the picture, skins included. In about a year I'll be able to tell you if it was a bad call.
I’m only here because the picture of the cake was the first thing you see using the app. And now I want cake with a mead chaser.
 

Blacksmith1

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That's my stove with a mango on it, not a cake.
The mead chaser sounds good though.

Perhaps you might get your eyeglass script checked:p
 

NGD

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That's my stove with a mango on it, not a cake.
The mead chaser sounds good though.

Perhaps you might get your eyeglass script checked:p
The brain see’s what it wants..and apparently today I want cake. Well pretty much everyday really. From the looks of it I thought it was a partially eaten, double layer vanilla cream cake with buttercream frosting. Either way mead all around!
IMG_7712.JPG


Cake obsession aside. I’m a newbie to mead. For something like your watermelon or this mango recipe what are you using to strain/filter it with?
 

Blacksmith1

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Damn, my bad. I didn't even notice it when I looked at the pic. That's exactly what it is, just like the one in the kitchen now. (Swmbo's fav) if your in FL stop by and I'll give ya a piece, sadly none of my meads are ready yet.

as for your question. Every thing I can find, I have a strainer from the dollar store, a large (2-3 inch across) tea ball from my local oriental market, cheese cloth, and a 75 micron brew bag.
After using the brew bag tonight I'm in the market for one that has a little larger holes so I can get the big stuff first, then the finer particles.
 
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MiBeerMan

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I was just reading in a different website about a tip someone received from a pro mead maker about a peach cyser recipe. The tip was adding fresh frozen-thawed peaches in during the last nutrient addition to help preserve some peach flavor instead of adding them at the beginning. I'm a beginner but to me this makes sense. My next attempt at peaches might be inline with this thinking. Any thoughts?
 

Miraculix

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I was just reading in a different website about a tip someone received from a pro mead maker about a peach cyser recipe. The tip was adding fresh frozen-thawed peaches in during the last nutrient addition to help preserve some peach flavor instead of adding them at the beginning. I'm a beginner but to me this makes sense. My next attempt at peaches might be inline with this thinking. Any thoughts?
Yes, add them when primary fermentation has finished to preserve even more flavour.
 

Miraculix

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Wouldn't that be the same thing as putting peaches in secondary? I'm talking about putting them in primary but at 1/3 sugar point
It's about the remaining amount of sugar, not about the vessel. I don't think that a secondary vessel brings you any benefit here.
 

MiBeerMan

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So you are saying add the fruit after fermentation is done. So what are you saying about the remaining amount of sugar? As far as secondary, I don't remember where I heard it but you compare it to adding ketchup to an already cooked meatloaf.
 

Miraculix

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The thing that drives off the aroma and flavor is the escaping co2 during active fermentation. Of course, sugar from the peaches will restart fermentation a bit, but at least there won't be additional fermentation time from residual sweetness from the honey, assuming that the abv is still below the yeast's limit.

The comparison with the cooked loaf is completely wrong. It is in general good practice to add fruit after main fermentation has finished. Don't ask me for how long it has to stay inside but afterwards you can transfer to secondary vessel to let it clear and to stabilise and backsweeten, if desired.
 

MiBeerMan

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so Im sitting here drinking a very young peach mango cider i started early last month using old orchard peach mango juice and a couple peach mango concentrate cans. After primary getting stuck around 1.014 i decided to rack it onto another concentrate can and a handful of frozen organic peaches. Stuck it in kegerator for a week to cold crash a little. Gravity jumped back up over 1.030 and ohhh is it sweet. Very intense peach flavor though. I stopped and thought for a second, why couldnt i do this using honey
 

bernardsmith

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But I wonder if the flavor found when fruit is added to the secondary is less to do with more flavor being expelled with the CO2 , though that is almost certainly part of the problem, and far more to do with the ability of alcohol (in the secondary) being able to extract more of the flavor than water, alcohol being a more powerful solvent than water. When you add all the fruit to the primary you are really using H2O to extract flavor (and an increasing amount of ethanol as the fermentation proceeds. When you add fruit to the secondary that fruit is immediately exposed to a powerful solvent at - what? 10%- 12% or more alcohol
 
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