Accidentally used Special B instead of Black Patent

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mattman91

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So, I brewed a porter and just realized I used Special B instead of Black Patent, which I intended.

Here is the grain bill:

63% Pale Malt
12% Munich
8% Chocolate Malt
8% C45
5% Flaked Barley
4% Special B

My concern is that this may turn out too sweet. Am I correct to assume this?
 

odie

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Isn't Special B like C-130 or something? Probably won't be too sweet but not too dark either?
 
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mattman91

mattman91

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Isn't Special B like C-130 or something? Probably won't be too sweet but not too dark either?
I think it is like 120. Brewfather says 34 SRM which sounds about right.
 
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mattman91

mattman91

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It won't be what you intended, but it may be fine and interesting. I've got a strong ale with 4% Special B in the cellar. With a few months on it's starting to taste pretty good. Prunes and raisins.
I'm wondering if I should maybe at some coffee at the end of fermentation.
 

spittiz

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I'm wondering if I should maybe at some coffee at the end of fermentation.
It's not a big issue IMO, I personally wouldn't bother with any more additions, and just let it ride. You might miss some dry roasted notes and get something slightly fruitier and sweeter instead, but if everything else went according to plan and the recipe is sound I bet it will be all right.
 

DBhomebrew

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Came home from work and pulled down another bottle of that strong ale I mentioned. It's turned into something very nice. I'm sure your brown ale will be just dandy.
 

easttex

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So, I brewed a porter and just realized I used Special B instead of Black Patent, which I intended.

Here is the grain bill:

63% Pale Malt
12% Munich
8% Chocolate Malt
8% C45
5% Flaked Barley
4% Special B

My concern is that this may turn out too sweet. Am I correct to assume this?
My initial read was "Hmm, I bet that'll be an interesting beer."
 

Steveruch

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So, I brewed a porter and just realized I used Special B instead of Black Patent, which I intended.

Here is the grain bill:

63% Pale Malt
12% Munich
8% Chocolate Malt
8% C45
5% Flaked Barley
4% Special B

My concern is that this may turn out too sweet. Am I correct to assume this?
You'll still have a porter. It'll still be good.
 

Miraculix

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So, I brewed a porter and just realized I used Special B instead of Black Patent, which I intended.

Here is the grain bill:

63% Pale Malt
12% Munich
8% Chocolate Malt
8% C45
5% Flaked Barley
4% Special B

My concern is that this may turn out too sweet. Am I correct to assume this?
The c45 is a bit much imo, but overall looks like an interesting stout!
 

Albionwood

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You will certainly get a completely different result - those two malts aren't even remotely similar. It will be paler than most Porters and probably much sweeter, as you now have 12% caramel malts. The Chocolate malt at 8% might contribute enough roast character, depending on the Lovibond, to help offset that. A lot depends on the yeast now. If you used something that attenuates well and doesn't contribute much fruitiness, it could work out.
 
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mattman91

mattman91

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You will certainly get a completely different result - those two malts aren't even remotely similar. It will be paler than most Porters and probably much sweeter, as you now have 12% caramel malts. The Chocolate malt at 8% might contribute enough roast character, depending on the Lovibond, to help offset that. A lot depends on the yeast now. If you used something that attenuates well and doesn't contribute much fruitiness, it could work out.
I used S-04. US-05 probably would have been the better option had I known that I screwed up on the Special B. I am fermenting at 64-65F, so hopefully at that temperature I won't get much of the fruity notes. The chocolate malt is 350L. Maybe there is hope!
 

DBhomebrew

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I gather this hasn't been fermenting too long. Not too late to co-pitch something to help to dry it out.
 
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mattman91

mattman91

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I gather this hasn't been fermenting too long. Not too late to co-pitch something to help to dry it out.
I pitched Sunday afternoon. I'll just let it ride. The only thing I have considered is throwing in some coffee before cold crashing to give some more roasty character. Still on the fence there.
 

MaxStout

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I pitched Sunday afternoon. I'll just let it ride. The only thing I have considered is throwing in some coffee before cold crashing to give some more roasty character. Still on the fence there.
Wait till you taste a sample first. What if this turns out to be tasty? Don't throw more variables into it yet. If it turns out it needs dimension, then add something.

In any case, keep us posted on this.
 

Miraculix

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I pitched Sunday afternoon. I'll just let it ride. The only thing I have considered is throwing in some coffee before cold crashing to give some more roasty character. Still on the fence there.
So much nope on the coffee!

S04 is a really really good stout yeast and the fruity character that might show up will fit perfectly well, you are a lucky person, don´t throw it into the garbage by adding coffee.
 

WESBREW

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the black malt. you are closer to a brown now. still good and should probably stick with it. if you wanted to push it towards porter/stout, maybe you could you steep the black patent on the stove, give it a quick boil and add to the fermenter?
 
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mattman91

mattman91

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wouldn't that make it more like a stout though? not a porter?
Maybe, but at this point, I have no idea what it is. Lol. Probably not a good idea anyway.

It's probably too dark for a brown, but not dark enough/too sweet to be a porter?

To be honest, at first I was super frustrated. Now, I'm very excited to see how this turns out. My biggest fear is that it may be a bit too sweet. Hopefully not cloyingly sweet.
 

Miraculix

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Maybe, but at this point, I have no idea what it is. Lol. Probably not a good idea anyway.

It's probably too dark for a brown, but not dark enough/too sweet to be a porter?

To be honest, at first I was super frustrated. Now, I'm very excited to see how this turns out. My biggest fear is that it may be a bit too sweet. Hopefully not cloyingly sweet.
If it should show up too sweet, you can make a hop tea out of plain water and bittering hops. This tea can solve a lot more ibus then wort could, so you can easily increase ibus in the beer afterwards, should it come out too sweet.
 
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I pitched Sunday afternoon. I'll just let it ride. The only thing I have considered is throwing in some coffee before cold crashing to give some more roasty character. Still on the fence there.
If you end up adding coffee, get instant espresso powder. Sounds super tasty, especially on top of the special b.
 
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mattman91

mattman91

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If it should show up too sweet, you can make a hop tea out of plain water and bittering hops. This tea can solve a lot more ibus then wort could, so you can easily increase ibus in the beer afterwards, should it come out too sweet.
The estimated IBUs in Brewfather says 41 so I think I'll be OK. Seems high for the style, obviously, but my lack of efficiency is to blame. I was shooting for 1.060 and got 1.054, so instead of 5.9% and 36ish IBUs I'll probably end up with around 5.4% and 41ish IBUs. This may end up being a good thing now, all things considered. What a beautiful mess this is 🤭
 

Miraculix

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i strongly disagree...stout is roasted UNMALTED barley that gives it a roasty character.....porters are, malted dark roasted carmely thing.....at least that's my opinion....
Yes your personal opinion. Stout and porters go back in history to the UK and were used at different times for the same beers. You can dive into shutupaboutbercleyperkins to get deeper into that subject, I can highly recommend it.
 

cmac62

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I'd use anything other than black patent. I really don't like that stuff. I have midnight wheat in my supply for color and a little burntness. :mug:
 

seatazzz

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I'd use anything other than black patent. I really don't like that stuff. I have midnight wheat in my supply for color and a little burntness. :mug:
+1 to that. I've used black patent in a couple of stouts, and to me it just gives way too much...hard to describe...harshness. Yep that's what I was looking for. Almost tannic. Might have been my process, but I've done stouts without it that turned out just fine.

Special B is in my top 5 of adjunct malts; I love the prune/raisin flavor it gives to stronger ales. I bet this one will be interesting to say the least, and probably pretty tasty.
 

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