Venting pressure in Fermzilla leading to massive foaming

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum:

skarz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2020
Messages
54
Reaction score
13
Last night I pitched a massive starter in to my well oxygenated wort. Second time using my Fermzilla under pressure. I thought I backed the wingnut out on the spunding valve enough but woke up this morning to Fermzilla at 20 psi. I vented the Fermzilla couple times to get pressure down to 8psi and it started foaming like CRAZY. The entire headspace is all foam. Since this is happening during primary / most active fermentation will this have any negative effect on the beer?

ALkkmXK.png
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
S

skarz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2020
Messages
54
Reaction score
13
As long as you don't let air (oxygen) in, no harm to the beer. The foaming should subside with time. FWIW, release pressure more slowly!

Since we're only 12 hours in since pitching yeast would oxygen even be a concern at this point? And yes lesson learned, I should have off gassed muuuuuuuch slower. I'm adding a pic to original post.
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
19,410
Reaction score
9,699
Location
Pasadena, MD
Beautiful !!!
Thanks for adding the picture, we always like to see mishaps. More accurately, we crave them, we like that sort of drama!
Besides, we need proof...

You could maybe carefully swirl the Fermzilla a bit to wash the foam and good yeast off the headspace walls? Not really necessary, though.
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
19,410
Reaction score
9,699
Location
Pasadena, MD
Since we're only 12 hours in since pitching yeast would oxygen even be a concern at this point?
It probably would be a concern, fermentation apparently has started, hence the foam, due to CO2 coming out of solution.

A 2nd oxygenation is helpful for high gravity brews (over 1.085). Typically aiming at 12-18 hours after the pitch and first oxygenation, but before active fermentation has started.

It's just difficult to catch it at the right time. I've been doing it at 8-12 hours as I've missed the window more than a few times, likely because of pitching very healthy, active yeast from a live starter.
 
OP
OP
S

skarz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2020
Messages
54
Reaction score
13
Also I updated original post, the PSI was only at 20 not 35 LOL. 35 is the max PSI for the Fermzilla.
 

McMullan

wort maker
HBT Supporter
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Messages
1,662
Reaction score
2,038
I think this is quite normal, as I found out after depressurising a kegmenter to swap the TC lid and yeast foamed out all over the place. You might want to drop the pressure slowly and check ball locks and spunding valve aren't gummed up with crud. If it sets, boom!

 

hotbeer

Opinionated Newb
HBT Supporter
Joined
Mar 10, 2021
Messages
1,282
Reaction score
912
If I didn't see the guage on it and know you were pressure fermenting I'd just think it looked like a normal ferment at 12 to 24 hours or so.

As to this question....
Since this is happening during primary / most active fermentation will this have any negative effect on the beer?
I don't really know since I don't pressure ferment, but it's usually a happy day for me to see that foam. Or I guess maybe your question is not so much about the foam but instead whether the over pressurization might have some bearing on off flavors. I don't know that either. Just hoping to learn from the discussion.

Is this a new yeast to you? Some I think produce more foam than others or maybe it's more to do with the recipe of the beer and the trub you might have transferred from the boil.
 
Last edited:

LloydGM

Silicon Dragon
Joined
Dec 2, 2018
Messages
19
Reaction score
7
Location
Seattle
(I know, old thread, but...)

What about adding vegetable oil after adding yeast? Some peeps use FermCap-S, but I'm not a fan of drinking silicone, even in small amounts since it adds up over time. This is what I'm talking about: Foam Control This is actually Birko's product, broken out from a gallon to small bottles. I've heard some people have used olive oil, even. o_O

Birko Patco 376, organic foam control :
Confessions of a Homebrewing Chemical Salesman | Birko Corp
https://atpgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/PATCO-376.pdf
“Add Patco 376 to raw or cooked material under continuous agitation for maximum dispersion and effect. For kettle defoaming, add ½ (0.5) oz. per bbl. before the wort comes to a rigorous boil. Be sure to add Patco 376 at the beginning of the boil, before foam is a problem. Add more Patco 376 during the boil if needed. For fermentation defoaming, use 12-25 ml. per bbl depending on the style of beer being produced and the type of yeast being used.”
Can buy it by the gallon here: Birko Patco 376 Defoamer - Ferm-Solutions
 
Top