That German Lager taste

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duncan.brown

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Agree we don't want a LoDO hijacked thread, but I think this 'side track' is right in line with the purpose of the O.P.'s original question
Yes, definitely a lot of useful information here! I think by declining to engage with negativity and the vast majority responding in a good faith manner, we have officially won the internet. And remember, it's an ATTRYTPOOBTHACS thread!
 

Miraculix

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Excellent discussion and insights. Agree we don't want a LoDO hijacked thread, but I think this 'side track' is right in line with the purpose of the O.P.'s original question.
This is basically the perfect example of a lodo hijack :D


Except we all started to behave a bit better, which is nice.
 

Bad Bubba

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I was wondering if anyone was using a Krausening method to carbonate your beer. I am curious because I have a friend and fellow home brewer Who focuses on German style beers. He is very process oriented trying to emulate the old style German brewing practices (to the point he conditions his beer in an underground cellar). His beers are outstanding. Krausening is how he carbonates most of his German style beers. I just wanted to get the thoughts of those on this thread about this technique -have not seen it mentioned yet.
 

hottpeper13

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As a home brewer ,having High K fermentating beer to add to a keg is a logistical nitemare. To remain in the Germans good graces I sometimes(holiday beers of 10+%) will pull 2 qts of wort after flameout in a canning jar and keep it in the fridge until packaging. As long as you know the gravity of the wort and the volume of beer there's a formula to figure the amount of wort to get the carbonation you want.
 

Bad Bubba

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I have done Krausening a couple of times on steam beer. I set aside the required amount of wort (1-1.5 quarts for a 5 gallon batch) and also some of my yeast starter. I freeze the wort and refrigerate the yeast. After fermentation of the main batch, I thaw the reserved wort and allow both it and yeast to warm to room temp pitch the yeast into the wort basically making a starter with the wort. Then add the fermenting starter to the main batch. I use a unitank and a spundling valve to control temp and fermentation. It is a little more complicated it not bad.
 

couchsending

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I was brewing a lot of beer there for a while and would krausen all sorts of beers from IPAs to Stouts and lagers. I never used saved wort for fear of oxidation.

It doesn’t need to be the exact same beer. I’ve krausened IPA with Pale ale or even another IPA with complete different hops. I’ve krausened stout with Dark Mild, Pils with Helles, Porter with dark lager, etc. You’re usually adding such a small amount of wort it won’t really have that big of an impact on the primary fermented beer.

You don’t need to krausen right after the beer is done fermenting. Plenty of lager brewers will krausen after the beer has been lagered for an extended period of time.

There’s a krausening calculator on Brewers Friend. Works like a champ.
 

monkeymath

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I've tried Aufkräusen once with a Helles. Froze some wort on brewday then made a starter with it a day or two before bottling. I used it to carbonate half the batch, the rest received table sugar. Tasting them next to each other and focusing really hard, I kinda-sorta felt that the kräusened beer was ever so slightly smoother, but honestly I could not tell them apart.

It might work better with a better process - if you brew more frequently, you can use a bit of each batch to kräusen the last - but if you're not truly committing to it then I don't fathom it's worth the effort. This is only my personal opinion, though, formed by a single attempt with a Helles that turned out rather mediocre.
 

Bad Bubba

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I was brewing a lot of beer there for a while and would krausen all sorts of beers from IPAs to Stouts and lagers. I never used saved wort for fear of oxidation.

It doesn’t need to be the exact same beer. I’ve krausened IPA with Pale ale or even another IPA with complete different hops. I’ve krausened stout with Dark Mild, Pils with Helles, Porter with dark lager, etc. You’re usually adding such a small amount of wort it won’t really have that big of an impact on the primary fermented beer.

You don’t need to krausen right after the beer is done fermenting. Plenty of lager brewers will krausen after the beer has been lagered for an extended period of time.

There’s a krausening calculator on Brewers Friend. Works like a champ.
I am trying to understand how saved wort would cause any more oxidation than any other wort. You should pitch it when it is fermenting which should consume any oxygen.
 
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