What is your favorite IPA yeast besides...

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Lando

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1056, Safale-05, Notty?
The 1056 and more recently the Safale-05 have been my IPA work horses since I started brewing. I had great luck with Ringwood Ale from Wyeast in Yoopers DF Clone.
Any other favorites? :mug:
 

BioBeing

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I used Ringwood in my last batch of Yooper's Dogfish head, and it turned out great too. Pacman works wonders, of course. I'm going to do a double batch this time with Pacman in 5 G and Wyeast 1968 London ESB in the other 5 G, just because I have it.
 

maida7

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I'm a white labs guy

WLP001 cal ale
WLP002 english ale
WLP004 irish ale
WLP005 british ale
WLP007 dry english ale
etc...

Even the Edingburgh WLP028 should work good.
 

MBasile

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I've only done one IPA so far and I used WLP001 because the LHBS was out of S-05. I have since acquired a backup pack of S-05, but my upcoming APA and AIPA are going to use harvested (3rd and 4th generations, respectively) Pacman that has done wonders in the two brews I've done with it. And yes, I harvested the Pacman from ONE bottle of DGA, proving they are NOT filtered as some people think. It just takes time.

Couple folks out there have harvested from Stone bottles to make IPA and Ruination clones.
Do you have any links to this? I was under the impression (from the brewery tour) that all of their beers are filtered. In an interview with Mitch, he said that the yeast used was a proprietary yeast and wouldn't give the exact information on it (a statement that is pointless if you're going to send it out in bottles that people can easily harvest from).
 

dunnright00

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In an interview with Mitch, he said that the yeast used was a proprietary yeast and wouldn't give the exact information on it (a statement that is pointless if you're going to send it out in bottles that people can easily harvest from).
I'm pretty sure that's just the Bastard Ales. Arrogant, Double, etc.
 

alexdagrate

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I've only done one IPA so far and I used WLP001 because the LHBS was out of S-05. I have since acquired a backup pack of S-05, but my upcoming APA and AIPA are going to use harvested (3rd and 4th generations, respectively) Pacman that has done wonders in the two brews I've done with it. And yes, I harvested the Pacman from ONE bottle of DGA, proving they are NOT filtered as some people think. It just takes time.



Do you have any links to this? I was under the impression (from the brewery tour) that all of their beers are filtered. In an interview with Mitch, he said that the yeast used was a proprietary yeast and wouldn't give the exact information on it (a statement that is pointless if you're going to send it out in bottles that people can easily harvest from).
This post on Northern Brewer claims to have harvested from a bottle of Stone IPA:
http://forum.northernbrewer.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=65347&hilit=+Stone+IPA+IPA+denny's

"After three attempts at cloning this beer I believe I finally have it. I just racked to secondary today, but I'm pretty confident in this recipe. This is for Stone's regular IPA, not Ruination. After brewing this latest attempt, I'm starting to see why their beers have become so expensive. It uses a lot of hops. Anyhow, here it is:

11.5 gallon batch. O.G. 1.063 F.G. 1.011 Srm 6.2 Ibus 77 This recipe is figured at 81% efficiency. Just adjust the specialty grains as necessary to hit 6-7 SRM

21.5# American two row
2# Crystal 20L
1# Crystal 10L

Hops
Magnum 60 minutes(adjust based on alpha to hit 77 ibus total)
2.1 oz Centennial at 10 minutes
2.1 oz Centennial at 5 minutes
4 oz Centennial at 0 minutes
Centennial dry hop, 1oz per five gallons

Pitched yeast from a three quart starter(per 5.5 gallons) at 64 degrees and fermented at 68 degrees wort temp.

Single infusion mash at 151. For the yeast, I cultured up the yeast from a bottle of Stone IPA. This is pretty similar to WLP001, but with a distinctive malty character. It's not really a make or break it factor though. The Stone yeast is highly attenuative, so if you sub the Chico strain, you might want to drop the mash temp a degree or two to reach your F.G."
 

BarleyWater

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My favorite yeast by far is the Anchor Liberty strain WLP 051 California V / 1272 American Ale YeastII. Very clean fermentation similar to, but slightly fuller bodied than Chico 001/1056/US-05.
 

ajf

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My favourites are WLP023 and Wyeast 1028. (Both for English IPA's)
The 023 gives a unique flavour which I love.
Please excuse my spelling, but I've never used either of them for an American IPA.

-a.
 

kappajoe

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I have had good luck with wlp004... if you wanted to try something different.
Pitch a nice size starter and watch your fermentation so it will attenuate at the higher end...
 

Brew-boy

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I used WLP002 in an american IPA and it was very good. I heard this is sort of close to the Stone yeast.
 

#p3brews

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Surprisingly nobody has said anything about Nottingham yeast. Was the first one i tried after Safale 05 and have used it a few times since. I like it. Easy and strong like 05.
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I also have used some Kviek yeast a few times but it leaves my beers on the hazy side which i'm not really into.
 

CascadesBrewer

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Since a thread from 2009 was revived...and it seems like an interesting topic...

My favorite yeast by far is the Anchor Liberty strain WLP 051 California V / 1272 American Ale YeastII. Very clean fermentation similar to, but slightly fuller bodied than Chico 001/1056/US-05.
I have almost always thrown WLP001/WY1056 at my IPAs and Pale Ales (which is my most common style to brew). I have hardly ever used US-05. I tend to harvest and repitch yeast so I often do many batches using one yeast. I swapped over to WLP051 for several batches toward the end of 2019. I eventually did a split batch IPA with WLP051 vs WLP001. I could not pick out the odd beer in a triangle, but swear the WLP051 beer had a crisper note and and more drinkability, where the WLP001 had just a touch of a fuller body. So the opposite of "last seen in 2018" BarleyWater.

There was a recent thread on a Facebook group asking about yeasts for a Pale Ale. The variety of answers to such a simple question made me realize how much there is to learn about brewing. I am curious about using other yeasts myself. The last times I have used WLP002, it just gives me that "bad homebrew without temperature control" fruity vibe, but maybe I just need to ferment it closer to 64F. I made some nice beers with Wyeast 1084 Irish Ale (WLP004) and I have been curious how it would work in an IPA/Pale Ale.

I recently brewed two Pale Ale (ish) beers with Voss. I think I like the one fermented at room temp (~72F) vs the one fermented at 85F. The lower temp version still has some Voss character, but not enough that it hides the hop character like the 85F one.
 

Brooothru

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This post on Northern Brewer claims to have harvested from a bottle of Stone IPA:
http://forum.northernbrewer.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=65347&hilit=+Stone+IPA+IPA+denny's

"After three attempts at cloning this beer I believe I finally have it. I just racked to secondary today, but I'm pretty confident in this recipe. This is for Stone's regular IPA, not Ruination. After brewing this latest attempt, I'm starting to see why their beers have become so expensive. It uses a lot of hops. Anyhow, here it is:

11.5 gallon batch. O.G. 1.063 F.G. 1.011 Srm 6.2 Ibus 77 This recipe is figured at 81% efficiency. Just adjust the specialty grains as necessary to hit 6-7 SRM

21.5# American two row
2# Crystal 20L
1# Crystal 10L

Hops
Magnum 60 minutes(adjust based on alpha to hit 77 ibus total)
2.1 oz Centennial at 10 minutes
2.1 oz Centennial at 5 minutes
4 oz Centennial at 0 minutes
Centennial dry hop, 1oz per five gallons

Pitched yeast from a three quart starter(per 5.5 gallons) at 64 degrees and fermented at 68 degrees wort temp.

Single infusion mash at 151. For the yeast, I cultured up the yeast from a bottle of Stone IPA. This is pretty similar to WLP001, but with a distinctive malty character. It's not really a make or break it factor though. The Stone yeast is highly attenuative, so if you sub the Chico strain, you might want to drop the mash temp a degree or two to reach your F.G."
I was reading a peer reviewed paper recently that suggested data confirming the genetic evolution of "Chico". BRY96 comes from the Seibel repository. In the 70s a sample of Ballentine's Brewing ale house yeast was put in Seibel's 'vault', eventually finding its way into the craft brewing explosion of the 80s. There are at least two decendents of that yeast that are very similar yet slightly different: WLP-001 and Wyeast 1056. There are other yeasts descended from them, but there may be a third 'direct' descendant of BRY96, the house yeast that may be used by Stone, and possibly Green Flash.

Some sources refer to 1056 as "Chico 1", WLP-001 as "Chico 2", and the (maybe) Stone yeast as "Chico 3". So by some accounts the arguably most popular ale yeast in the craft brew revolution came from a bankrupt post prohibition brewery in Baltimore by way of Germany to Sierra Nevada in (wait for it...) Chico, CA. Allegedly that's Wy1056.

Disclaimer: I'm not a microbiologist, nor have I slept in a Holiday Inn Express in quite some time. So take these observations as just that. That said, these are likely possibilities backed with more science than popular speculation.
 

Nate R

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I was reading a peer reviewed paper recently that suggested data confirming the genetic evolution of "Chico". BRY96 comes from the Seibel repository. In the 70s a sample of Ballentine's Brewing ale house yeast was put in Seibel's 'vault', eventually finding its way into the craft brewing explosion of the 80s. There are at least two decendents of that yeast that are very similar yet slightly different: WLP-001 and Wyeast 1056. There are other yeasts descended from them, but there may be a third 'direct' descendant of BRY96, the house yeast that may be used by Stone, and possibly Green Flash.

Some sources refer to 1056 as "Chico 1", WLP-001 as "Chico 2", and the (maybe) Stone yeast as "Chico 3". So by some accounts the arguably most popular ale yeast in the craft brew revolution came from a bankrupt post prohibition brewery in Baltimore by way of Germany to Sierra Nevada in (wait for it...) Chico, CA. Allegedly that's Wy1056.

Disclaimer: I'm not a microbiologist, nor have I slept in a Holiday Inn Express in quite some time. So take these observations as just that. That said, these are likely possibilities backed with more science than popular speculation.
Has Ken Grossman (founder of Sierra Nevada) ever stated where it came from? I know he was running a lhbs before the brewery, and of course he was brewing beer well before that, too...
I guess i could look deeper but i have not seen much since.
Also- since he did his porter first... maybe that was the beggining of his "house" yeast?
It's crazy to think of not only what he did for craft brewing... but how many other countless American Legends have been brewed with Chico... as Broothrou puts it perfectly.
 

bkboiler

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seconded BRY97.
is my new go to IPA yeast. Cleaner than S-05 and easier to work with than WLP001.
 

tbaldwin000

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Has Ken Grossman (founder of Sierra Nevada) ever stated where it came from? I know he was running a lhbs before the brewery, and of course he was brewing beer well before that, too...
I guess i could look deeper but i have not seen much since.
Also- since he did his porter first... maybe that was the beggining of his "house" yeast?
It's crazy to think of not only what he did for craft brewing... but how many other countless American Legends have been brewed with Chico... as Broothrou puts it perfectly.
He does go into the topic in Beyond the Pale in some depth, however it is some time since I read the book so my recollection isn't clear enough to speak with confidence here. Highly recommend the book, though.
 

youngdh

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For NEIPA, Voss Kveik fermented hot for the esters and the quick turn around. Prior to Voss coming on scene it was Conan.
 

mashpaddled

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Not much of an IPA brewer or drinker but when I do I am not creative. London Ale III for hazy beers and one of the Chico variants for non-hazy IPA. Chico is a bland yeast but that clean ale yeast flavor is the hallmark of pre-hazy American craft beer. I use London Ale III for a lot of other American craft styles.
 

CascadesBrewer

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Lallemand Verdant
Fermentis S-33
Fermentis K-97
What style IPAs are you using those for? Or should I guess from the username??

I have a pack of Verdant and S-33. I picked them up thinking I would try them out in a hazy/NEIPA, but I also want to branch out in my more classic American Pale Ale and IPA style beers.
 

thehaze

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What style IPAs are you using those for? Or should I guess from the username??

I have a pack of Verdant and S-33. I picked them up thinking I would try them out in a hazy/NEIPA, but I also want to branch out in my more classic American Pale Ale and IPA style beers.
I've used K-97 and S-33 for both West Coast/Red IPAs, Black IPAs and hazy IPAs, and Verdant for West Coast IPAs, Bitters, Reds, Brown, Imperial Stout. Verdant will also work in hazy IPAs very well.

S-33 is an English yeast and although attenuates and flocculates less than desirable, it makes very good beer. K-97 is also an example of maybe an overlooked dry yeast. Versatile, good attenuation - can clear up if cold crashed or fined.
 

Northern_Brewer

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Has Ken Grossman (founder of Sierra Nevada) ever stated where it came from? I know he was running a lhbs before the brewery, and of course he was brewing beer well before that, too...
They're open about it originally coming from the Siebel Institute in Chicago originally, there's interviews online if you can be bothered to dig through them eg
this with Stephen Dresler :
When I ran the quality department, which I no longer do, I would bring in a slant from Siebel in Chicago and I would work it up through propagation to brewing quantities. Seibel held the culture for us. Back at that time, it was a yeast strain that Ken had selected from their yeast catalog. It was Slant #96. I'd call up Maureen at Seibel and say I needed a couple of slants of #96 and she would take them off of their master slant, and she would ship them to me overnight, and I would get them going. After we put in our lab, we then could keep the yeast slants in our cryo freezer, on site. We do have a secondary storage facility and yeast lab where we keep backups, just in case something horrific happened or your cryo fridge blew up. Over the years, as we've used this strain in larger and larger tanks, it has taken on more "house character". The yeast is our yeast now, for all intents and purposes. We maintain the strain completely in-house now.
Andrew: Is that the same strain used for bottle and can conditioning of the Pale Ale?
Steven: Yes. For our ale strain, the bottling yeast is the same as what is used for fermentation.



I was reading a peer reviewed paper recently that suggested data confirming the genetic evolution of "Chico".
If you're talking about the recent Chico paper from the Dunham lab that is discussed here, it's a preprint and not yet peer-reviewed :

Although initial sequencing of BRY-97 put it in the mixed group close to Windsor/S-33, current rumour is that was a mistake and subsequent sequencing suggests it's another "improved" descendant of BRY-96 like WLP090 etc.

It's also worth noting that this thread was started in 2009 before NEIPAs even existed, which do best with a very different kind of yeast compared to West Coast IPAs which was what the OP would have intended.
 

bwible

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I like 1056 because its so versatile. There are probably 10 styles I could easily pitch and re-use this yeast for over and over again and it does a great job with all of them. Clear beers that I actually drink. Some yeasts I struggle to find a good third style to re-pitch.

1272 is also versatile, it can probably make most of or about everything 1056 can, too.

Wyeast lists 1728 Scottish Ale yeast as another versatile strain and claims it also makes a decent “house strain.” I never made an APA or an IPA with 1728.

I tried 1332 Northwest Ale in most recent APA and IPA I just did. They say that yeast is English in origin. I think I still like 1056 the best.

I have been making blonde ale/plager over and over again for the last year. I used 1968 in one and 1099 in another and after cold aging they were very good. I could see one of these making good APA, IPA also. As a bonus, you could make Bitter with either of these first.
 
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