Vitamin C - The Game Changer?

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hopjuice_71

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I put it in a purged keg, made sure I purged it again with CO2 after the open-and-dump, and then did a closed-transfer.

Not sure I follow. I ferment in a keg (primary) and dry hop directly in this. I may or may not transfer to a serving keg, depending on the laziness factor. But it sounds like you are just using powder and not pre-dissolving?
 
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Not sure I follow. I ferment in a keg (primary) and dry hop directly in this. I may or may not transfer to a serving keg, depending on the laziness factor. But it sounds like you are just using powder and not pre-dissolving?
That is correct, I allowed the natural agitation of the beer entering the keg to do whatever dissolving was going to happen.
 

micraftbeer

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I posted about my experiment in another HBT thread here. But I recently brewed 3 batches of the same beer, altering mash water additions to add Ascorbic Acid powder in one, and making YOS water in another. My personal blind taste testing, plus a handful of neighbors blind tasting, was not able to differentiate the beers.
 
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Miraculix

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I posted about my experiment in another HBT thread here. But I recently brewed 3 batches of the same beer, altering mash water additions to add Ascorbic Acid powder in one, and making YOS water in another. My personal blind taste testing, plus a handful of neighbors blind tasting, was not able to differentiate the beers.
That is an interesting read. I think you might probably need to have some problems first to really taste a difference when the problem is gone. Also, and I think that one might be even more of an issue, I recently used the same amount of vitamin c in a beer that you did, even a tiny bit more, and the beer came out with slight oxidative issues, so it looks like the amount of vitamin c wasn't enough to really make a difference. At the end, all of your batches might have been slightly oxidised during the mash, that's why there was no detectable difference.
 

McMullan

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Yet to try it out. My schedule got disrupted by phantom COVID 🤧 I'm now trying to aim for being home alone over the Easter holiday, to do some binge brewing. Sorry, 'DIY' 🤫 Things might get a bit messy without good planning. I might have to train the dog to use a paint brush 🤔
 
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Miraculix

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After my last attempt with a lower amount of Vitamin C failed, I will now use 4g on 20l and brew an apa, just because I am sick and tired of all the experiments I am doing while I could just produce a proven and nice beer instead.... And for experiments sake, I will try some rye malt instead of wheat just to see if the foam.... waaaaait a minute!
 

McMullan

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Norway, officially the world's least self-sufficient country, has profiteering restrictions on 'food' imports?

As a stark reminder amidst the unfolding situation, a timely map of agricultural land in Europe surfaces.

iczSBoLo-miCq2rw_s2NNQ1lSEDq5t5VvL7VcpuOLKAw.jpeg


Norway heads straight to the top of an exclusive in-the-**** list.
 
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McMullan

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But some hung up their horns (if they had any) and settled down. Some of my Derbyshire ancestors were them. For the record, I'm not a fan of Kviek strains for the most part.

BTW, Neanderthals probably were no more warlike than contemporaneous sapiens, but they certainly lived in Britain, and much less certainly maybe in Scandinavia. Modern English (the people and possibly the band) carry a healthy dollop of Neanderthal genes.

ETA: As this (off) topic is a hobby of mine, I disagree with some of what McMullan says below, but am reluctant to go forward with an off topic debate. If anyone wants details, PM me.
It's likely true that they were less war-like, at least from a struggle-for-existence point of view. Clearly, not successful there. That's why Europe's neanderthal populations contracted and went extinct locally, outside obvious refugia. Whatever happened to these 'special folk' after cowering in valleys, fiddling with first cousins for 1000 years? As a geneticist, I can make you wonder. I can make your toes curl. As an 'inferior imigrant' I can open your eyes and scare the Jesus out of you. These things are worse than barbarians. And I hate to be the one to inform you, but your distant ancestors from Derbyshire are significantly less related to you, genetically, than a random bus driver from down the road, regardless of his or her ethnicity. A little bit funny, me thinks.

So you claim Neanderthals didn't make it to what's Scandinavia today? That interesting, mainly because it makes no sense, whatsoever, in any associated field of study.

I'll leave you with this to contemplate, because the difference, the oddness, needs to be explained. Blaming foreigners doesn"t cut it, frankly.
 

VikeMan

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It's likely true that they were less war-like, at least from a struggle-for-existence point of view. Clearly, not successful there. That's why Europe's neanderthal populations contracted and went extinct locally, outside obvious refugia. Whatever happened to these 'special folk' after cowering in valleys, fiddling with first cousins for 1000 years? As a geneticist, I can make you wonder. I can make your toes curl. As an 'inferior imigrant' I can open your eyes and scare the Jesus out of you. These things are worse than barbarians. And I hate to be the one to inform you, but your distant ancestors from Derbyshire are significantly less related to you, genetically, than a random bus driver from down the road, regardless of his or her ethnicity. A little bit funny, me thinks.

So you claim Neanderthals didn't make it to what's Scandinavia today? That interesting, mainly because it makes no sense, whatsoever, in any associated field of study.

I'll leave you with this to contemplate, because the difference, the oddness, needs to be explained. Blaming foreigners doesn"t cut it, frankly.

Ok then.
 
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Miraculix

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I was all excited, thinking there was some new action, some new test/trial someone had done with Ascorbic Acid, and then... Maybe it should be split off into a thread called "How Closely Am I Related to Neanderthals, and What Grains Did They Use to Brew Beer?"
I am using it regularly now, in every brew, together with the salts. Works well for me.
 

McMullan

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I was all excited, thinking there was some new action, some new test/trial someone had done with Ascorbic Acid, and then... Maybe it should be split off into a thread called "How Closely Am I Related to Neanderthals, and What Grains Did They Use to Brew Beer?"

I used about 4g in a standard 23L batch of lager. The pH dropped marginally and I convinced myself I could detect a twang in the finished product. It was probably more to do with using dry yeast (Diamond). I'm now using 1g in 12L. Nothing to report so far, apart from it doesn't seem to have any detrimental effects and I occasionally forget to add it.
 
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z-bob

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I just found this thread. Back on page 1 there were comments and questions about using ascorbic acid to dechlorinate tapwater. I use K-meta to dechlorinate my strike water, but [when I do a sparge] I use a Vitamin C tablet to dechlor and acidify the sparge water. I think they are 500mg tablets and it's usually about 6 to 8 quarts of water. I have no idea how much it actually acidifies; I haven't measured that. I mostly do full-volume mashes now without a sparge, (BIAB) but I can't see any harm in adding vitamin C to the kettle, or to the fermenter.
 
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