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Beatty Brewer

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I have a quick question. If I put a room temperature floating glass thermometer into boiling or near boiling water will it break? Is it better to put it in the water at the start and let them heat together?
 

Arneba28

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dont but it in the boil I had one overpressurize and break. just get one of the chefs probe thermometer with a cllip for the side of your brew pot. the floater is ok once your not boiling
not to mention, malt will get stuck to the thermometer and hops will boil up and get stuck on the head
 
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Beatty Brewer

Beatty Brewer

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Thanks for the answer. I think one of those came with my turkey fryer. It's amazing what I can forget.
 

Philip1993

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Make sure you use a good thermometer and check the calibration on that dial thermometer before you bet on it.

Also, remember that they are designed for use in their mid-range and may be horribly inaccurate at the extremes. Mine is off -20*at 160, but dead on at 350-400.

Beatty Brewer said:
I have a quick question. If I put a room temperature floating glass thermometer into boiling or near boiling water will it break?
Save yourself the trouble of using a thermometer. Water boils at 212*F.
 

abracadabra

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Beatty Brewer said:
I have a quick question. If I put a room temperature floating glass thermometer into boiling or near boiling water will it break? Is it better to put it in the water at the start and let them heat together?
I have a question.

Why on earth do you want to measure the temp of boiling or near boiling water?
 

Philip1993

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abracadabra said:
I have a question.

Why on earth do you want to measure the temp of boiling or near boiling water?
A: To confirm that it is at, or near, 212*F :D
 

abracadabra

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pldoolittle said:
A: To confirm that it is at, or near, 212*F :D
Sorry PL I was asking the OP. Besides it's only 212*F at standard pressure at sea level. Barometric pressure at your altitude determines the actual boiling point. At standard pressure the boiling point of water in Denver, CO. is 202*F.

I you want to know the boiling point of water you'll need the barometric pressure of your area. You can get that from the weather channel http://www.weather.com/ by entering your zip code.

Enter the pressure in inHG (inches of mercury) on the calculator here:

http://www.primogrill.com/boiling.htm
 

Philip1993

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abracadabra said:
Sorry PL I was asking the OP.
I know. I was just being a smart a**.


abracadabra said:
Besides it's only 212*F at standard pressure at sea level. Barometric pressure at your altitude determines the actual boiling point. At standard pressure the boiling point of water in Denver, CO. is 202*F.

True, but it never changes unless you move and you can't change it w/o a pressure vessel. Which brings us back to the first original question; Why does the OP want to measure the temperature of boiling water?
 
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Beatty Brewer

Beatty Brewer

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I was doing an extract batch with steeped grains and wanted to wait until the water temp was under 170 to avoid the tannins, but looking back, with less than a pound of crystal grains it probably did not matter. I was just paranoid about the thermometer's ability to handle the sudden change in temp.
 

Jesse17

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I use a instant read meat thermometer. It puts steeping temps right in the middle of it's range, and reed's 210° - 211° F in boiling water. I'm just assuming that is correct for 2500' elevation. (Close enough for me anyway!)
 
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