Fermenting L17 imperial yeast lager help

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Beerschmack

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I need help with what I should do.
Rice hull- 1/2 / .5 lbs
Flaked barley - 1/4/.25lbs
Corn flakes - 1 lbs
Briess pale ale malt -4 lbs
OG came out to 1.02
Threw 3 lbs of brown sugar into the 5gallon wort while temperatures were dropping and mixed it in. Let temperatures drop to 55 and pitched the yeast. (Imperial Yeast L17)
Any idea what I should do about the amount of brown sugar I added it’s almost going to be a week into fermentation and I’ve been taking out the krausen since I think it would taste better.
Also trying to figure out what type of style beer this sounds like.
This recipe sounds like a mess. There’s like almost 50 grams of hops in it. But with taking them out with krausen maybe it will turn out good??
Final OG came out to 1.05
 

Jag75

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I'll have to agree , it does sound like a mess lol. What made you decide on these ingredients if I may ask?

I've never seen that much sugar used in a small batch. That's gonna be very very dry. I used 1# before it came out super dry.

What were you trying to make ?

How did you measure gravity?

Also you really don't want to be opening your fv . It invites all kinds of bad stuff .
 
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Beerschmack

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I have attached the recipe but I thought it had a little more grains than I expected or to put it in other words I’m tryna stretch my grains ;) lol
 

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Beerschmack

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Are all the grains and hops still in the fermenter?
I'll have to agree , it does sound like a mess lol. What made you decide on these ingredients if I may ask?

I've never seen that much sugar used in a small batch. That's gonna be very very dry. I used 1# before it came out super dry.

What were you trying to make ?

How did you measure gravity?

Also you really don't want to be opening your fv . It invites all kinds of bad stuff .
I started with putting grains in the pot after measurement, threw water in. Brought to boiling point and kept that range of 140-145 for one hour and than dropped the 7 grams of hops which were cascade. Than strained it as much as possible. Brought to a boil of 150-155 got a little crazy for 3 minutes at 160. Let the total boil 30 minutes and at that half 30 I dropped a whirlfloc and at the end I put 10 grams of cascade hops. Kept that boil and dropped the rest of the 10 grams of hops when I threw it in the fridge for cooling. So In the morning I pitched the yeast at 55 degrees Fahrenheit And in 12 hours it started fermenting.

I am taking out the krausen out and trashing it every day. And keeping that temperature below 55 Fahrenheit
 
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Beerschmack

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Yeah I know I am taking risk cuz I don’t have the money for a fermentersaurus so I am using it like this and my beer has its own fridge since it broke so I just use the top and unplug everyday and keep a lid on it to reduce that light from the fridge.
 

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I’m not sure I have any useful suggestions for this batch other than letting it go and see what it turns into. Unless you are worried about the krausen expanding too much and running out, leave it alone and quit opening the fermenter… the krausen is there for a reason. I think maybe taking a step back and really studying the steps and processes of beer making would be in order before trying another batch. Proper equipment is beneficial too. Lots of good used equipment on Craigslist and such.
 
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Beerschmack

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Yeah I know I am taking risk cuz I don’t have the money for a fermentersaurus so I am using it like this and my beer has its own fridge since it broke so I just use the top and unplug everyday and keep a lid on it to reduce that light from the fridge.
I also measured gravity with a beer hydrometer. So i got a 1.5 reading, I was wondering how often I should take a reading for a pager that way I can reduce contamination and save a few bucks on starsan
 
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Beerschmack

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I’m not sure I have any useful suggestions for this batch other than letting it go and see what it turns into. Unless you are worried about the krausen expanding too much and running out, leave it alone and quit opening the fermenter… the krausen is there for a reason. I think maybe taking a step back and really studying the steps and processes of beer making would be in order before trying another batch. Proper equipment is beneficial too. Lots of good used equipment on Craigslist and such.
Sounds like a great idea. I’m still working on my set up we got a lot of work to do. I’ll definitely keep reading. Any idea what kind of recipe I can do with the list of grains I have above for a pale ale with coriander and orange peel ?
 

camonick

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Sounds like a great idea. I’m still working on my set up we got a lot of work to do. I’ll definitely keep reading. Any idea what kind of recipe I can do with the list of grains I have above for a pale ale with coriander and orange peel ?

For the cost of one batch of ingredients or less, you could get a bucket (good) or a FerMonster (better) and have much more success. As far as your ingredients… I would browse this forum of tried and true American Pale Ale recipes. This book is highly recommended for beginners.
 
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Beerschmack

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For the cost of one batch of ingredients or less, you could get a bucket (good) or a FerMonster (better) and have much more success. As far as your ingredients… I would browse this forum of tried and true American Pale Ale recipes. This book is highly recommended for beginners.
Can you please recommend a lager one too, I like those more. And I like the fridge cuz right now in so cal it’s 90+ and I feel scared of fermenting in a bucket
 

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As @camonick said , you need to read up on brewing process. A few things pop out to me.

Was the grain milled?

You say boiling temp but you mentioned 140-150. Are you talking the temp of your mash ?

Did you boil the grain ?

Confirming your OG
and your FG



Your trying to save money and I get it , but some beers will cost you some cash to make . The last thing you want is a dumper because you were unfamiliar with the process.
 

camonick

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Can you please recommend a lager one too, I like those more. And I like the fridge cuz right now in so cal it’s 90+ and I feel scared of fermenting in a bucket
You really need a fermenter of some sort no matter what style of beer you’re making. Thousands of gallons of homebrew are made each year in buckets just like the one I linked. The recipe you posted above will make a nice American style macro lager. It’s a little light on bitterness (IBUs) in my opinion, but if brewed just like it’s written, will make a good beer. It appears to be for a 10 gallon batch, so cutting all the listed ingredients in half will get you pretty close. I’d still consider increasing the hops a little bit. Like @Jag75 said, skimping on ingredients will usually lead to an inferior beer, or worse. Less base malt and/or adjuncts means less alcohol. I was also wondering if the grain you were using was crushed? Also, mashes are never done at boiling temps (≈200°+). Using the correct terminology for every step is also very important. I would also recommend using dry yeast like 34/70 for lagers and US-05 or Nottingham for ales for a while until you become more proficient.
 

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I’m struggling to tell from your description what’s really going on.

Boiling = 212f or 100c (corrected for altitude). Are you saying boiling but mean “heated”?

At what point did you remove the grain from the liquid?

Skimming krausen is unnecessary and only serves as a vector for bad things.

Don’t “stretch” your grains, that’s what make good beer, not 3 pounds of brown sugar.

Lastly, I mean this earnestly and with no snideness, a good beginner book or YouTube will help you out big time. There seem to be a lot of missed concepts going on.

Keep it up, keep asking questions and get some good beer going!
 
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Beerschmack

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As @camonick said , you need to read up on brewing process. A few things pop out to me.

Was the grain milled?

You say boiling temp but you mentioned 140-150. Are you talking the temp of your mash ?

Did you boil the grain ?

Confirming your OG
and your FG



Your trying to save money and I get it , but some beers will cost you some cash to make . The last thing you want is a dumper because you were unfamiliar with the process.
I’ll make sure to kee notes and read the book so I can get better.

All of the Grains were milled prior to receiving them, yes.

My boil temperatures were 140-145 for the mash. And I don’t think I did a mash out cuz I simply felt the worst was ready because of the 1 hour “mashing” aka stirring and my fingers were a little sticky so I assumed it was perfect cuz I remember that when I first made the stout my fingers were sticky but didn’t know how to read a hydrometer till I looked at instructions. Than I took out the grains and boiled water to get the remainder wart for 5 gallons. So than I boiled it for 30 minutes. What is this last boil called? I forgot. Mash out? This boil was 150-155. And than I sit it to cool till morning.
OG: 1.05
FG: [need help with date]

By the way when should I check up on the wort since I wont be opening the fridge anymore. I started fermenting on June 15, 2022.
I have got my cleaning supplies and my tank and keg ready for kegging. I’m excited :)
For cleaning supplies I have five star pbw and star San and for my lube I have petrol-gel. Got my co2 filled from local brewery.
 
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IslandLizard

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My boil temperatures were 140-145 for the mash.
My emphasis.^
Merely heating the wort to 140-145F is not boiling as @Kickass explained here:
Boiling = 212f or 100c (corrected for altitude). Are you saying boiling but mean “heated”?


Than I took out the grains and boiled water to get the remainder wart for 5 gallons. So than I boiled it for 30 minutes. [...] This boil was 150-155.
After the mash, you indeed separate the wort from the (spent) grains. Wort is pronounced "wert," sounds similar to word, but it ends on a hard "t" and the vowel is held short and sharp. Warts grow on your skin, nothing to do with beer. ;)

The spent grains get discarded, although they could be rinsed (sparged) first to extract some more precious sugars trapped in the wet grain.
If you mashed using a mesh bag or a stainless screen basket you simply remove the grains by pulling the bag or basket out of the kettle (or other mash vessel). Let it drip out into your kettle, to collect as much of the sugars as you can.
Grain in a bag or basket can be sparged too if you see fit to collect as much sugar as you can. Many homebrewers do.

After separating the grains from the wort (and adding the collected wort from the sparges, if you did), the wort is then brought to a boil.
Again, boiling is heating the wort to 212°F (100°C) and keep it boiling (simmering) for 60 minutes.* You know it's boiling when you see the surface rippling, bubbling, or even wildly splashing sticky wort all over place. A mere surface ripple (simmer) is plenty for boiling wort.
This is called the wort boil or simply the boil.

* The length of a boil can vary, 60 minutes is common. But sometimes the boil is kept shorter, sometimes longer, all depending on the grains used, your recipe, your methods, and a few other factors.
 

IslandLizard

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Also was wondering how I should filter this.
Homebrewers do not filter beer, usually, with very, very few exceptions.

After fermentation has completed, all (or most) trub will settle out on the bottom of the fermenter given it ample time, a few days to a few weeks.
You don't disturb it, you carefully siphon the beer off the top to package (in bottles or a keg), leaving the trub behind.
 
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Beerschmack

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My emphasis.^
Merely heating the wort to 140-145F is not boiling as @Kickass explained here:




After the mash, you indeed separate the wort from the (spent) grains. Wort is pronounced "wert," sounds similar to word, but it ends on a hard "t" and the vowel is held short and sharp. Warts grow on your skin, nothing to do with beer. ;)

The spent grains get discarded, although they could be rinsed (sparged) first to extract some more precious sugars trapped in the wet grain.
If you mashed using a mesh bag or a stainless screen basket you simply remove the grains by pulling the bag or basket out of the kettle (or other mash vessel). Let it drip out into your kettle, to collect as much of the sugars as you can.
Grain in a bag or basket can be sparged too if you see fit to collect as much sugar as you can. Many homebrewers do.

After separating the grains from the wort (and adding the collected wort from the sparges, if you did), the wort is then brought to a boil.
Again, boiling is heating the wort to 212°F (100°C) and keep it boiling (simmering) for 60 minutes.* You know it's boiling when you see the surface rippling, bubbling, or even wildly splashing sticky wort all over place. A mere surface ripple (simmer) is plenty for boiling wort.
This is called the wort boil or simply the boil.

* The length of a boil can vary, 60 minutes is common. But sometimes the boil is kept shorter, sometimes longer, all depending on the grains used, your recipe, your methods, and a few other factors.

Wow this is excellent I appreciate these comments. So I’ve been boiling wrong since day one lol

So to clarify the process I should mash at 140-145 sometimes more depending on grains. Proceed to sparge, bring to a boil for 30 minutes to an hour and more if needed per recipe.
 
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Beerschmack

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You really need a fermenter of some sort no matter what style of beer you’re making. Thousands of gallons of homebrew are made each year in buckets just like the one I linked. The recipe you posted above will make a nice American style macro lager. It’s a little light on bitterness (IBUs) in my opinion, but if brewed just like it’s written, will make a good beer. It appears to be for a 10 gallon batch, so cutting all the listed ingredients in half will get you pretty close. I’d still consider increasing the hops a little bit. Like @Jag75 said, skimping on ingredients will usually lead to an inferior beer, or worse. Less base malt and/or adjuncts means less alcohol. I was also wondering if the grain you were using was crushed? Also, mashes are never done at boiling temps (≈200°+). Using the correct terminology for every step is also very important. I would also recommend using dry yeast like 34/70 for lagers and US-05 or Nottingham for ales for a while until you become more proficient.
Definitely taking this into considering. I like the macro call on the beer style for the lager haha I definitely went my way on this one even when I multiplied by half. Why I went my route, is a decision man has made time after time lol
 
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Beerschmack

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Homebrewers do not filter beer, usually, with very, very few exceptions.

After fermentation has completed, all (or most) trub will settle out on the bottom of the fermenter given it ample time, a few days to a few weeks.
You don't disturb it, you carefully siphon the beer off the top to package (in bottles or a keg), leaving the trub behind.
Glad the beer process really settles out easily. I’m getting the idea of just waiting for the krausen to drop clear to just siphon to keg.
 
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Beerschmack

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I’m struggling to tell from your description what’s really going on.

Boiling = 212f or 100c (corrected for altitude). Are you saying boiling but mean “heated”?

At what point did you remove the grain from the liquid?

Skimming krausen is unnecessary and only serves as a vector for bad things.

Don’t “stretch” your grains, that’s what make good beer, not 3 pounds of brown sugar.

Lastly, I mean this earnestly and with no snideness, a good beginner book or YouTube will help you out big time. There seem to be a lot of missed concepts going on.

Keep it up, keep asking questions and get some good beer going!

I feel like I’m in chemistry again. Without having to understand boiling or freezing points lol glad to be learning here for what we love to do best. ( I dropped the course btw) lol

I removed the grain at the end of the hour of the “mash.” That’s why I had to reach out for help, my mash wasn’t a real mash, The beer never achieved a boil after sparking, besides approaching boiling and stopping at 160 once for a couple minutes and I thought that was crazy.

Yeah it was a long day and bad process, I was so mad because I felt I threw away all the goodies (grains) or didn’t have enough. But the beer honestly taste better than expected. I will throw some more hops in there probably about ten grams.

My question is when should I add these hops and I also wonder if you guys could recommend some botanicals to spice things up, would love to drink this for my birthday coming up next month.
 

IslandLizard

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So I’ve been boiling wrong since day one lol
Not boiling wrong, you weren't boiling!
You can't boil wrong. It's either a boil or it's not.

Similar to being pregnant. You are, or you are not. ;)

In short:
If you didn't bring the wort to around 212°F (100°C), you weren't boiling.

The actual boiling temp you can reach depends on barometric pressure. Elevation plays a big role in it.
212°F is the boiling point of water (wort) at sea level at 1 atmosphere (~1 bar) of pressure, or ~14.7 psi.
For example, if you were on top of Mount Everest (elevation 29,000 ft.) your wort would be boiling at 154F.
 

camonick

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So to clarify the process I should mash at 140-145 sometimes more depending on grains. Proceed to sparge, bring to a boil for 30 minutes to an hour and more if needed per recipe.
No.
I think this might have been covered above, but I’ll repeat it…Mashes are typically performed between 148-156° for 60 minutes depending on style of beer being made. After that a sparge might be performed to extract as much sugar as possible (depending on mashing method), grains are discarded. The wort is then heated to boiling and the hops are added at different intervals depending on the hopping schedule for that recipe (early hops for more bitterness and later hops for flavor and aroma). Traditional boils are usually 60 minutes long. Cool. Siphon to fermenter. Add yeast. Don’t peek. Package when fermentation is complete. The book mentioned above will be the best $20 you can spend right now.
 
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Beerschmack

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No.
I think this might have been covered above, but I’ll repeat it…Mashes are typically performed between 148-156° for 60 minutes depending on style of beer being made. After that a sparge might be performed to extract as much sugar as possible (depending on mashing method), grains are discarded. The wort is then heated to boiling and the hops are added at different intervals depending on the hopping schedule for that recipe (early hops for more bitterness and later hops for flavor and aroma). Traditional boils are usually 60 minutes long. Cool. Siphon to fermenter. Add yeast. Don’t peek. Package when fermentation is complete. The book mentioned above will be the best $20 you can spend right now.
Got it sounds perfect can’t miss with this one :D
 
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Beerschmack

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Could not wait to lager any longer. Check out how it came out, still letting it lager though couple weeks.
 

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Beerschmack

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So here’s the other beer from the same one less carbonation. During second fermentation I just threw some hops in it let it ferment and drained most of it out since it was to hoppy for me. And I just threw it in the keg. But it was great it settles at the bottom if you like it in your beer it’s alright. The hops in this second fermentation helped clear that bad smell I didn’t like, was to hesitant to wait for it to settle another day so these two beers came out. Some of it clogged the line so I had to clean it. But overall great beer :D
 

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