Want to stop buying bottled water for brewing

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Gavin C

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I use this filter
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0006IX87S/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

With this hose
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ME11FS/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

I brew outside so I just connect this when im ready to brew and I have filtered water without going to the store.
That will not result in RO water similar to store-bought.

It is minimally useful. If you want it to eliminate chlorine the contact time with the carbon filter required means a very slow flow rate. Would take hours to filter your brewing water effectively. Also it will do nothing to eliminate chloramines regardless of flow-rate.

The Camco filter is a useful macro-filter. That is all.
 
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TexasDroughtBrewery

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That will not result in RO water similar to store-bought.

It is minimally useful. If you want it to eliminate chlorine the contact time with the carbon filter required means a very slow flow rate. Would take hours to filter your brewing water effectively. Also it will do nothing to eliminate chloramines regardless of flow-rate.

The Camco filter is a useful macro-filter. That is all.
That is very interesting to know, I guess I won't waste money buying any additional filters or replacement cartridges. My beers taste good so I don't see any problem using my tap water I guess.
 

BrewerBrad82

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Ok, then you will want to know the specific water's mineral content and adjust the minerals accordingly to target certain residual alkalinities, calcium content and chloride/sulfate.

When brewing extract, the minerals are already in the extract so those beers should be brewed with RO/distilled.
 

GHBWNY

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I've only ever brewed with bottled water. I came here trying to figure out what I need to do to use my tap water. If the answer is simply nothing at all, then I guess I'm good. I'm not sure why you are confused about me coming here to ask that? :confused:
If my "confusion" is over anything, it is why someone would arbitrarily treat their tap water without knowing if it's necessary.
 
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heckofagator

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If my "confusion" is over anything, it is why someone would arbitrarily treat their tap water without knowing if it's necessary.
Well, I've heard about campden, but never used them. I didn't know if this is a must do, or an option, or best practice, or what. Again, this is a forum for asking questions and getting opinions. I'm still just so confused why you have a problem with me asking questions
 

brew703

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I've been using the filtered water from those stand alone machines. 5 gal for $1. I haven't had any issues yet. I treat it as RO water when using Bru N Water's spreadsheet and add whatever calcium and gypsum it calls for. I don't test for PH however it's probably time I invest in a PH meter. Just too cheap I guess.
 

grrickar

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Our local water company pre-softens our water, so the sodium ions are artifically high. I posted some numbers and everyone was asking why I took water from my softener to brew with. Thing is, I don't have a water softener. The water department confirmed they soften the water, so I am stuck buying too...
 

McKnuckle

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II don't test for PH however it's probably time I invest in a PH meter. Just too cheap I guess.
I don't test either. I have taken the empirical approach of leveraging the Brewer's Friend water calculator, and using trial and error to determine that when it says the predicted mash pH is between 5.4-5.5 at room temp, I like the resulting beer. Might not satisfy the true scientist, but works for me in practice. The beers with lower pH have sometimes been astringent, and I have not yet ventured higher (although I think I will soon).
 

bbohanon

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I have been looking into putting in an RO system at my house for the cost and convenience as well.
Its painful up front for cost and effort to get it all bought and installed, but man if I could reduce the plastic waste/cost of having to make trips to the store for Primo refills or distilled water in 1gal jugs on 10gallon brew days, its worth it.

I am on well water that would take WAY too much to get it dialed in on my beers so putting in an RO system to have that water on-hand readily is my next step.
 

GHBWNY

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Well, I've heard about campden, but never used them. I didn't know if this is a must do, or an option, or best practice, or what. Again, this is a forum for asking questions and getting opinions. I'm still just so confused why you have a problem with me asking questions
I guess I somehow misunderstood and I apologize if you took my point the wrong way. I don't have a problem with your asking questions; that is absolutely what we are all here for. I was simply trying to make the point that *if it were me*, I would want to know if there was something in my water that warranted treatment before doing so. Again, that's just me.

Although it's been overstated and debated, I always heard, "if it your water tastes good, then it's good for making beer." So, I've been using our tap water as-is; never treated it or had it tested. We get an annual water report from our municipal provider and I must confess I'm ignorant in knowing what the numbers mean, although there is no hint of chlorine in the smell or taste. In the event of something negative in the water we don't know about, we run all of our drinking water through an Aquasana under-sink filter which I also use for brewing.

Hope you find your solution. :mug:
 

brew703

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I don't test either. I have taken the empirical approach of leveraging the Brewer's Friend water calculator, and using trial and error to determine that when it says the predicted mash pH is between 5.4-5.5 at room temp, I like the resulting beer. Might not satisfy the true scientist, but works for me in practice. The beers with lower pH have sometimes been astringent, and I have not yet ventured higher (although I think I will soon).
I had one astringent beer and that was in the beginning. After about three months of bottle conditioning it was a great beer. For that brew, I think I used spring water but I sort of contribute the astringency to fermentation temp.

I thought about getting a PH meter but really don't want to spend $100 plus the cost of solution. Just seems like a PITA to me.
I use Bru N Water and I always add about 2-2.5% acid malt to my grain bill and so far never had an issue.
 
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