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missing link

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I have a Lager that is 7 days into primary. According to the yeast, I am supposed to rack it after 5 - 7 days. My gravity is 1.015 currently but it is still bubbling the airlock every few seconds. Should I rack it over anyway or wait for the activity to subside. My target gravity is 1.013.

This is my first lager.....

I'm hoping to have it ready for a super bowl party but I don't want to rush it.......

Thanks

Linc
 

Soulive

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I wouldn't rack anything that is still fermenting. I also wouldn't count on that being ready for the superbowl. Sorry man...
 

cheezydemon

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I recently did my first Lager. I was short of carboys, so I skipped the secondary and bottled. I then lagered in the bottle.

They are too crisp and clear. Meaning they did not need to secondary. It was a Munich Helles, so it is supposed to have little flavor, but MAN! I wouldn't mind it having a little more.

Yeah, better brew an ale,.... like yesterday, for the superbowl. Sorry!
 

Bobby_M

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Did you taste your sample? Did it have any diacytel (popcorn butter flavor)? If so, now is the time to warm it up over the course of a couple days to about 65F. Then rack to secondary and get it cold for a while. Lagers don't tend to peak for at least a month in the cold and they can benefit from 3 months... don't brew lagers if you're impatient....edit.. don't brew at all if you're impatient.
 

TexLaw

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Wait. After you rack, wait another few weeks. After you bottle or keg, wait another 2-3 months. Then, you're ready. Sorry, man, but this isn't a Super Bowl beer (at least, not for this year's).


TL
 
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missing link

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The recipe in the book is a bit confusing then. I know I would normally ferment until done, rack over to secondary for 2 weeks, keg and wait at least 3 weeks.

However, this is what the book says (clone brews by Tess and Mark Szamatulski) ferment 5-7 days or until fermentation is complete, siphon to secondary, dry hop, then bottle when fermentation is complete.

This batch would be back up for the party. My local brewery sells a cornie fill for less than I can buy ingredients ($35 for 5 gallons) so I am getting a fill tonight, plus I have an Ale I made a few weeks ago fermenting as well. It went in to secondary today and should be ready in a few weeks.

Thanks for the input.

Linc
 

TexLaw

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What are you cloning here? I've not been impressed by what I've seen from the Szamatulskis' recipes. I have "Beer Captured," myself, and I think all the recipes say the same thing you stated, whether it's a clone for Murphy's Irish Stout or Sierra Nevada Bigfoot. The only difference is some note at the end about when the beer peaks, or something like that.


TL
 

Yooper

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What yeast are you using? If you're using an ale yeast for a pseudo-lager, then you might be ok. Most of my lagers are in the primary for 12-14 days, then I do a diacetyl rest if needed, and then secondary for a week or two, then I start the lagering process and lager for about 6-8 weeks.

If you're not making a "real" lager with lager yeast, though, then you can make some modifications. What is the temperature you're fermenting at?
 

superfluent

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TexLaw said:
What are you cloning here? I've not been impressed by what I've seen from the Szamatulskis' recipes. I have "Beer Captured," myself, and I think all the recipes say the same thing you stated, whether it's a clone for Murphy's Irish Stout or Sierra Nevada Bigfoot. The only difference is some note at the end about when the beer peaks, or something like that.
TL
I agree. I'm a total newbie so I probably shouldn't comment, but anways, my feeling when I looked for recepies in "Beer Captured" is that it felt like the movie "Groundhog Day". It just keeps repeting itself, almost mecanically.

H
 
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missing link

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It's a Sam Adams Clone and I used a Lager yeast. Wyeast 2206. It's at 49 degrees +/- 1 degree.

I'm not impressed with the Szamatulski book either. If I didn't have beer smith I would have totally ruined 2 batches because the book fails to mention water adjustments when switching from Extract to PM or All Grain.

I'm hoping to find some recipes that I like and then play with them to make it a recipe I love.

Thanks guys

Linc
 

Soulive

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missing link said:
It's a Sam Adams Clone and I used a Lager yeast. Wyeast 2206. It's at 49 degrees +/- 1 degree.

I'm not impressed with the Szamatulski book either. If I didn't have beer smith I would have totally ruined 2 batches because the book fails to mention water adjustments when switching from Extract to PM or All Grain.

I'm hoping to find some recipes that I like and then play with them to make it a recipe I love.

Thanks guys

Linc
I have the clone books as well. I really just use them as a starting point or reference for the different beers/styles. Then, as you said, I smooth things out in Beersmith before brewing. There are just too many variables to follow their recipes exactly...
 
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missing link

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Where do you guys go for recipes usually? My problem is that I like beer, I just don't really know all the styles to be able to say what styles I like.

I don't drink coffee, nor do I like the roasted flavor of malts so a lot of Stouts and porters don't appeal to me. Most everything else I seem to like and I'm trying to build a group of recipes that I like. We all have the same problem, 5 gallons at a time makes it hard to try many. Though I'm on a roll making 11 batches in 8 months.
 

sirsloop

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The answer to this question every time is wait. There are few brews (if any) that work best when rushed. An exception to that rule could be a small IPA...
 

Yooper

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missing link said:
Where do you guys go for recipes usually? My problem is that I like beer, I just don't really know all the styles to be able to say what styles I like.

I don't drink coffee, nor do I like the roasted flavor of malts so a lot of Stouts and porters don't appeal to me. Most everything else I seem to like and I'm trying to build a group of recipes that I like. We all have the same problem, 5 gallons at a time makes it hard to try many. Though I'm on a roll making 11 batches in 8 months.
Well, I usually come here for recipes first! I sometimes follow the recipe exactly, sometimes not. I tweak recipes all the time, though, and use Beersmith alot for that. You'll find that once you know what style and ingredients you like, it'll become much easier. I find I don't like roasty- ness in my beers either, so I tend to stick with styles that I know I like- ambers, IPAs, APAs, a few lagers, and the Dead Guy clone. I kind of rotate through them. I do make an occasional brown ale or ESB but never a stout or porter!
 

Homebrewjosh

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missing link said:
Where do you guys go for recipes usually? My problem is that I like beer, I just don't really know all the styles to be able to say what styles I like.

I don't drink coffee, nor do I like the roasted flavor of malts so a lot of Stouts and porters don't appeal to me. Most everything else I seem to like and I'm trying to build a group of recipes that I like. We all have the same problem, 5 gallons at a time makes it hard to try many. Though I'm on a roll making 11 batches in 8 months.
Buy lots and lots of fermenters and kegs. Fill all of them. then rotate them so you always have beer.
 

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