Oat Milk

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Virginia_Ranger

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Just to change things up a little bit and I keep reading about it.... I'd like to use oat milk in my next NEIPA. My question is, is there a certain type I should buy? They all seem to say refrigerate after opening or some of them are all ready refrigerated. Just don't want it to spoil in the fermenter....
 

Jag75

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Love oat milk , but I dont think I'd ever put it in my beer . Are people actually adding this to their brew ?
 

Dog House Brew

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Can't you just soak steel cut oats over night and drain off the liquid? I will say that only use McCann's Irish. I've tried every other brand and none compare.
 

Dgallo

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Why don’t you just use malted or flaked oat.... oat milk is Literally water that had flaked oats soak it in if it’s pure. Many brands have other added starches and preservatives. Why used the processed ingredient when you have the raw ingredient readily available?
 

s_a_m_a_n_t_h_a

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Love oat milk , but I dont think I'd ever put it in my beer . Are people actually adding this to their brew ?
I found an interesting "study" (complete scientific method and all!) on this actually by someone named brulosophy. "The oat milk beer did have a great mouthfeel at first, but my ultimate preference was for the flaked oats version, as it maintained a fresher flavor much longer." However, the guy found how much clearer oat milk made his beer
 

Dgallo

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I found an interesting "study" (complete scientific method and all!) on this actually by someone named brulosophy. "The oat milk beer did have a great mouthfeel at first, but my ultimate preference was for the flaked oats version, as it maintained a fresher flavor much longer." However, the guy found how much clearer oat milk made his beer
I appreciate what Brulosophy does but he is by no means a scientific study. He is a guy who knows how to conduct an experiment but then has 20 ppl taste his beer. Unless it’s a study where he sent it out to be analyzed, take it for what it, a self conducted study where tasters pallets and preferences are completely different.

If you’re using just to add body, model your beer around other half brewing. t. Use 35-50% malted oats, mash at 154*f, and hit the beer with a heavy dryhop.
 

s_a_m_a_n_t_h_a

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I appreciate what Brulosophy does but he is by no means a scientific study. He is a guy who knows how to conduct an experiment but then has 20 ppl taste his beer. Unless it’s a study where he sent it out to be analyzed, take it for what it, a self conducted study where tasters pallets and preferences are completely different.

If you’re using just to add body, model your beer around other half brewing. t. Use 35-50% malted oats, mash at 154*f, and hit the beer with a heavy dryhop.
I know, that's why the word study is in quotes. I just mentioned the scientific method because of the template of his article, it's similar to an actual research paper.
 
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Virginia_Ranger

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The oat milk was out of pure curiosity and while the brulosophy, lets just call it a test showed it dropped eventually, I wanted to add more have. Current recipe has 27% Oat Malt already but I am just having issues with whats in the keg starting to clear in about 2 weeks. Anything I can off retains its haze. I know haze is a by product but you all know you'd be shocked / a little weirded out if you got a NEIPA from Treehouse, Other Half, Trillium, Veil, etc and it wasn't fully hazy.

edit: also typically mashing at 152 90 min single step
 

Dgallo

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The oat milk was out of pure curiosity and while the brulosophy, lets just call it a test showed it dropped eventually, I wanted to add more have. Current recipe has 27% Oat Malt already but I am just having issues with whats in the keg starting to clear in about 2 weeks. Anything I can off retains its haze. I know haze is a by product but you all know you'd be shocked / a little weirded out if you got a NEIPA from Treehouse, Other Half, Trillium, Veil, etc and it wasn't fully hazy.

edit: also typically mashing at 152 90 min single step
One of you problems for your body is your mashing for 90 minutes. Mashing longer and lower around 152 allows for the beta amylase enzyme in the mash to work on the longer chain starches for an extended time and will make your wort more fermentable. This allows the yeast to convert more sugars to alcohol and leaves less complex sugars behind to help build your body and you’ll result in a thiner beer.

Now on to haze, it’s the by product of yeasts interaction between proteins and polyphenols. The size of the protein chains are very important because you want them to have less molecule weight so they won’t drop out. So without knowing your grain bill, hopping schedule, how clean your wort is going into the fermenter yeast strain, or dryhoping process, it would just be a shot in the dark to guess why your beers are dropping clear so quickly
 
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Virginia_Ranger

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grain biil is:

27.8% Torrified Wheat
27.8 % Oat Malt
33.3% Pilsen Malt 2-Row
11.1% Pilsen DME (smaller system gotta boost abv)

Dry Hoping I typically do 24-48 hours in (depending on fermentation kick off), again at 5 or 6 days after that and then sometimes a final keg hop for a week or so cold during / after carbonation but before canning or putting in another serving keg.
 

Dgallo

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grain biil is:

27.8% Torrified Wheat
27.8 % Oat Malt
33.3% Pilsen Malt 2-Row
11.1% Pilsen DME (smaller system gotta boost abv)

Dry Hoping I typically do 24-48 hours in (depending on fermentation kick off), again at 5 or 6 days after that and then sometimes a final keg hop for a week or so cold during / after carbonation but before canning or putting in another serving keg.
What brand DME. They tend to list what percentage of the DME is what malt. Pilsen DME is typically Pilsner and carapils but again depends on the brand
 

Dgallo

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grain biil is:

27.8% Torrified Wheat
27.8 % Oat Malt
33.3% Pilsen Malt 2-Row
11.1% Pilsen DME (smaller system gotta boost abv)

Dry Hoping I typically do 24-48 hours in (depending on fermentation kick off), again at 5 or 6 days after that and then sometimes a final keg hop for a week or so cold during / after carbonation but before canning or putting in another serving keg.
So one thing off the bat that I notice is that you’re using a very high protein grainbill and the bulk of your dryhoping is during fermentation. This may help with low o2 pickup but it also increase the polyphenol and protein reaction (I’d assume you get quite a bit of hopburn initially in your beers).

With torrified wheat being unmalted, it’s protein chains are quite a bit longer than those of malted wheat since the malting process actual will alter the protein chains and cut them into smaller ones. Since these chains are long and have more molecular weight to start, when then get bound to polyphenols in the hops, they become even heavier. When your beer is conditioning cold, these heavier compounds will drop out of suspension causing your beer to clear
 
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Virginia_Ranger

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Thanks, after about 1-2 weeks of conditioning I've noticed my NEIPAs have hit their stride since they have been able to calm down a bit. I've been reading a lot about just doing the 1 dry hop right before the end or at the end of fermentation for this style and want to try it. It seems the internet wants to contradict research though since most forums and reddit advocate for the dry hop during fermentation in order to get haze and lasting hop flavor / aroma via the binding.
 

Dgallo

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Thanks, after about 1-2 weeks of conditioning I've noticed my NEIPAs have hit their stride since they have been able to calm down a bit. I've been reading a lot about just doing the 1 dry hop right before the end or at the end of fermentation for this style and want to try it. It seems the internet wants to contradict research though since most forums and reddit advocate for the dry hop during fermentation in order to get haze and lasting hop flavor / aroma via the binding.
Well the new best practice for dryhoping is to not dryhop at all during fermentation and drop all yeast out of suspension by soft crashing prior to dryhoping at 50-60*f

Our thread here in HBT on NEIPAS is honestly the most comprehensive and researched base for the style out there with both quantitative and anecdotal evidence.
 
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