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American IPA "Northeast" style IPA

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anteater8

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Speaking of YVH... I've been buying pounds of hops from them for years. I just ran the numbers yesterday and and realized its only around $0.15 more per oz to buy in 2 oz packages. I'm think I'm ok paying an extra $2 per batch to almost exclusively use freshly opened bags. Plus those vacuum seal bags aren't cheap anyway.
 

Dgallo

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Also, clearly off topic, but also a nod of appreciation to people and content here... I really REALLY wish there was a west coast IPA thread anywhere close to as useful as this one.
Im surprised there isn’t actually lol. That said, I literally brew my west coast the same as my NE but flip my cl & so4 ratio and do a 60 minute 1 oz addition of magnum. Grain might be slightly different since I do want some malt flavors
 

secretlevel

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Also, clearly off topic, but also a nod of appreciation to people and content here... I really REALLY wish there was a west coast IPA thread anywhere close to as useful as this one.
1. Look up Two Hearted Ale clone recipe
2. Make with different hops and dry hop
3. Profit
 

Loud Brewing

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1. Look up Two Hearted Ale clone recipe
2. Make with different hops and dry hop
3. Profit
I disagree. There has been a huge shift here in the west to push the evolution of wcipa. As much as I enjoy classics like two hearted, blind pig etc. the landscape has been changing by going away from things like crystal malts, cascade/ctz, huge ibu additions and only using chico.
Everyday I am finding new examples of "new school" "modern" wcipa. As much as purists of the style might balk, these beers are currently some of my favorite to brew/drink, and in my opinion this new iteration of wcipa has a lot left to be explored and discussed.
 

Loud Brewing

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20200224_205030.jpg
This is a wcipa I just canned with all pilsner, vienna and carafoam with no crystal, bittered with co2 hop extract to 50ibu, long hop stand at low temps of amarillo and citra, heavily dry hopped, high ppm total Cal but balanced Cl/S water profile fermented cool with a blend of conan and chico and super high co2 vols.
6.5% and delightful .
 

isomerization

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Final gravity plays one of the biggest roles in building recipes, and how those recipes are perceived by the drinker. Most people have had that prototypical cloying hazy that finished at 1020 and has zero boil additions. However if it's a layered approach that we are taking with the hops, all of a sudden your 40 ibu boil addition isn't percieved nearly as bitter with all that residual sugar finishing at 1020.
With that being said I prefer a higher mash temp 154-156f mainly to enhance body/mouthfeel, as the residual sugar sweetness is heavily offset by my boil additions/dh/water chem etc.
Gotta disagree. Grain bill, hop timing (and varietal), yeast strain and attenuation are all more important than mash temp (of course imo).

As mentioned above by another poster, residual sugars from mashing high, assuming proper attenuation, are long-chain dextrins, which are not perceived as sweet. Increased mouthfeel/body, sure, but that is not the cause of cloying sweetness.
 

Loud Brewing

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Gotta disagree. Grain bill, hop timing (and varietal), yeast strain and attenuation are all more important than mash temp (of course imo).

As mentioned above by another poster, residual sugars from mashing high, assuming proper attenuation, are long-chain dextrins, which are not perceived as sweet. Increased mouthfeel/body, sure, but that is not the cause of cloying sweetness.
You are right, FG doesn't always directly correlate to sweetness, especially based on mash temps. What I was trying to say is that the relationship between ibu and residual sugar is imo important to consider when building a recipe BU:GU. As far as long chain sugars are concerned, I understand the science but I still typically "percieve" a greater level of sweetness in higher FG beers that were mashed higher. Yes its anecdotal, but it's my experience. Similar to hard and firm IBU numbers relating to percieved bitterness, actual/percieved sweetness isn't always definitive. Medium chain sugars perhaps? :)
 
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beervoid

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In my experience its not FG that counts but OG and consequently higher OG also usually results in higher FG but the more grains in the bill the sweeter the beer and ofcourse sweetness from added abv.
So you need to balance bigger beers with a bit more bitterness.
 

Loud Brewing

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In my experience its not FG that counts but OG and consequently higher OG also usually results in higher FG but the more grains in the bill the sweeter the beer and ofcourse sweetness from added abv.
So you need to balance bigger beers with a bit more bitterness.
This (and everything else discussed above) is why I assume that most BU:GU charts use OG instead of FG to scale bittering. I love how everything in brewing and fermenting works in concert, it's so fascinating to me.
 

echoALEia

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Hey all

Sorry to get a little off topic, but here are two different beers I brewed, the one on the left is just with IOY Juice and the right is a blend of S33, K97, and WB06. Both were cask conditioned with F2. The grists are fairly similar (basically 38% malted oats, the rest rahr 2 row, Munich II, And carafoam). The SRM for both are 5.5 (next time I’m going higher). The hops on the left are Galaxy, Citra, Mosaic, and Amarillo, the right are Strata, Citra, and Idaho7. I’ve used the recipe on the left and won a competition with it and if I was drinking it by itself, I would crush and love it as a NEIPA.

That being said, the one on the right blows it away in terms of aroma, taste, and color (no, the one on the left is definitely not oxidized). It’s much more tropical fruit all around and reminds me of my favorites from EQ, OH, and monkish. Not quite treehouse yet but I think less hops might make it more like their core beers. Hope this helps in your search of yeast. Cheers!

IMG_6175.JPG
 

wepeeler

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So I finally was able to do an 11 gallon split batch and DH one fermenter on Day 2 and the other on Day 5 to see (taste) if there was a difference in appearance, flavor, aroma and haze stability. On kegging day, the Day 2 DH was juicer, fuller, less harsh and just as hazy and light colored as the Day 5 DH. A week later in the keg and the Day 2 DH beer was clearing and darkening ever so slightly. The aroma was much less than when we kegged. The Day 5 DH beer was still super hazy, aroma was off the hook, but the flavor was a touch salty on the back end. Week 2 in the keg and they are different beers. The aroma on the Day 2 DH is gone and the beer is basically clear. The Day 5 DH beer is still super aromatic, light and has a great mouthfeel.

Perhaps the haze produced during biotransformation is indeed different than the haze produced during a later DH addition. I know there are other variables in this "exbeeriment", but I feel like we did everything in our power to keep all other processes the same. The only difference was the fermentation DH schedule. Perhaps the biotransformation haze was the binded polyphenols and proteins dropping out and clearing the beer once it was cold crashed (kegged)? Maybe that's why the early DH was smoother because the polyphenols dropped out, but were still present in the later DH beer (which was harsher at first). Perhaps the haze produced by the later DH was more hop oils, and they don't precipitate out, since they aren't as heavy as the polyphenol/protein interaction?

I say "perhaps" above, because I don't really know for sure. It was a nice little "exbeeriment", but I'd feel more confident reproducing this a few times and seeing if the results are the same.

After reading about haze stabilization produced during early DHing, I think more research needs to be done. I'm sure different yeast, malt and hop combos would change this as well. So many dang variables.

As for me, I think my mind was changed a little, and my next neipa I won't be DHing so early during fermentation. Forever a learning process...
 

flintoid

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Hey all

Sorry to get a little off topic, but here are two different beers I brewed, the one on the left is just with IOY Juice and the right is a blend of S33, K97, and WB06. Both were cask conditioned with F2. The grists are fairly similar (basically 38% malted oats, the rest rahr 2 row, Munich II, And carafoam). The SRM for both are 5.5 (next time I’m going higher). The hops on the left are Galaxy, Citra, Mosaic, and Amarillo, the right are Strata, Citra, and Idaho7. I’ve used the recipe on the left and won a competition with it and if I was drinking it by itself, I would crush and love it as a NEIPA.

That being said, the one on the right blows it away in terms of aroma, taste, and color (no, the one on the left is definitely not oxidized). It’s much more tropical fruit all around and reminds me of my favorites from EQ, OH, and monkish. Not quite treehouse yet but I think less hops might make it more like their core beers. Hope this helps in your search of yeast. Cheers!

View attachment 668555
If you don't mind me asking- what was your S-33 / K-97 / WB-06 blend ratios / weights?

I've been doing the old S-04 / T-58 / WB-06 blending and have tired of it. The esters aren't as bright as I want them to be.

I've noticed English Yeasts (1318, S-04) give off a darker SRM. I did a Kveik and it was a brighter SRM (same grain bill) and I swear it had punchier esters.
 

SanPancho

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Hey all

Sorry to get a little off topic, but here are two different beers I brewed, the one on the left is just with IOY Juice and the right is a blend of S33, K97, and WB06.

View attachment 668555
nice. what are the ratios of the individual strains? same pitch time or staggered? temp?

most importantly, were you able to get a good read on the blend's ester profile before the hops took over?
 

isomerization

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So I finally was able to do an 11 gallon split batch and DH one fermenter on Day 2 and the other on Day 5 to see (taste) if there was a difference in appearance, flavor, aroma and haze stability. On kegging day, the Day 2 DH was juicer, fuller, less harsh and just as hazy and light colored as the Day 5 DH. A week later in the keg and the Day 2 DH beer was clearing and darkening ever so slightly. The aroma was much less than when we kegged. The Day 5 DH beer was still super hazy, aroma was off the hook, but the flavor was a touch salty on the back end. Week 2 in the keg and they are different beers. The aroma on the Day 2 DH is gone and the beer is basically clear. The Day 5 DH beer is still super aromatic, light and has a great mouthfeel.

Perhaps the haze produced during biotransformation is indeed different than the haze produced during a later DH addition. I know there are other variables in this "exbeeriment", but I feel like we did everything in our power to keep all other processes the same. The only difference was the fermentation DH schedule. Perhaps the biotransformation haze was the binded polyphenols and proteins dropping out and clearing the beer once it was cold crashed (kegged)? Maybe that's why the early DH was smoother because the polyphenols dropped out, but were still present in the later DH beer (which was harsher at first). Perhaps the haze produced by the later DH was more hop oils, and they don't precipitate out, since they aren't as heavy as the polyphenol/protein interaction?

I say "perhaps" above, because I don't really know for sure. It was a nice little "exbeeriment", but I'd feel more confident reproducing this a few times and seeing if the results are the same.

After reading about haze stabilization produced during early DHing, I think more research needs to be done. I'm sure different yeast, malt and hop combos would change this as well. So many dang variables.

As for me, I think my mind was changed a little, and my next neipa I won't be DHing so early during fermentation. Forever a learning process...
Any difference in attenuation or time to complete fermentation between the two batches?
 

SRJHops

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So I finally was able to do an 11 gallon split batch and DH one fermenter on Day 2 and the other on Day 5 to see (taste) if there was a difference in appearance, flavor, aroma and haze stability. On kegging day, the Day 2 DH was juicer, fuller, less harsh and just as hazy and light colored as the Day 5 DH. A week later in the keg and the Day 2 DH beer was clearing and darkening ever so slightly. The aroma was much less than when we kegged. The Day 5 DH beer was still super hazy, aroma was off the hook, but the flavor was a touch salty on the back end. Week 2 in the keg and they are different beers. The aroma on the Day 2 DH is gone and the beer is basically clear. The Day 5 DH beer is still super aromatic, light and has a great mouthfeel.

Perhaps the haze produced during biotransformation is indeed different than the haze produced during a later DH addition. I know there are other variables in this "exbeeriment", but I feel like we did everything in our power to keep all other processes the same. The only difference was the fermentation DH schedule. Perhaps the biotransformation haze was the binded polyphenols and proteins dropping out and clearing the beer once it was cold crashed (kegged)? Maybe that's why the early DH was smoother because the polyphenols dropped out, but were still present in the later DH beer (which was harsher at first). Perhaps the haze produced by the later DH was more hop oils, and they don't precipitate out, since they aren't as heavy as the polyphenol/protein interaction?

I say "perhaps" above, because I don't really know for sure. It was a nice little "exbeeriment", but I'd feel more confident reproducing this a few times and seeing if the results are the same.

After reading about haze stabilization produced during early DHing, I think more research needs to be done. I'm sure different yeast, malt and hop combos would change this as well. So many dang variables.

As for me, I think my mind was changed a little, and my next neipa I won't be DHing so early during fermentation. Forever a learning process...
Thanks for sharing the results. Sounds like a strike against the DH at high krausen...

I am still trying to experiment with a small DH on Day 3.5, near the end of fermentation. But I also do another 2-3 days before bottling. Doing a pretty cold final DH right now (bottling on Sunday). It's at 53 degrees (I was going for 58; I use ice, so it's not a precise system). I think Janish suggested even trying to DH during cold crashing, so we'll see how this turns out...
 

echoALEia

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If you don't mind me asking- what was your S-33 / K-97 / WB-06 blend ratios / weights?

I've been doing the old S-04 / T-58 / WB-06 blending and have tired of it. The esters aren't as bright as I want them to be.

I've noticed English Yeasts (1318, S-04) give off a darker SRM. I did a Kveik and it was a brighter SRM (same grain bill) and I swear it had punchier esters.
Sure! So I detailed this a little more in depth in the treehouse yeast isolation thread but basically I brewed 35 gallons of this and used s33 as my primary ferment. I pitched about 90g of it. When I did my first dry hop after 4 days, I pitched 11g of wb06 with them and I had a 5 gallon (minus the 35) side fermentation of k-97 going in a hop cannon and pitched the ddh hops in that right before I reached terminal gravity. I didn’t get many esters from the k-97 ferment, but prior to dry hopping the s33 I would say the esters were slightly peachy or even cherry like. It was hazy af before even hopping which leads me to wonder if the haze comes mostly from the whirlpool hops.
 

echoALEia

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nice. what are the ratios of the individual strains? same pitch time or staggered? temp?

most importantly, were you able to get a good read on the blend's ester profile before the hops took over?
I hope my last post helps a little. My starting ferm temps were 64 day 1 I believe then upped it to 66 on day 2 then let it go when I dry hopped.
 

wepeeler

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Any difference in attenuation or time to complete fermentation between the two batches?
No difference. Same OG, FG and fermentation time and temps. Only difference was the DH schedule.

Thanks for sharing the results. Sounds like a strike against the DH at high krausen...

I am still trying to experiment with a small DH on Day 3.5, near the end of fermentation. But I also do another 2-3 days before bottling. Doing a pretty cold final DH right now (bottling on Sunday). It's at 53 degrees (I was going for 58; I use ice, so it's not a precise system). I think Janish suggested even trying to DH during cold crashing, so we'll see how this turns out...
I guess I'll know more after a few more batches. Really trying to nail my process down. Janish mentions soft crashing before DH, but also states that he does indeed DH during some fermentation, for O2 scrubbing (just later during fermentation, not say day 1 or 2).

I was really under the impression that stable haze was produced with earlier DH, so this was cool to see in action. Hoping to do a few more of these mini "exbeeriments" in the future. Fun stuff.
 

marchuk96

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I disagree. There has been a huge shift here in the west to push the evolution of wcipa. As much as I enjoy classics like two hearted, blind pig etc. the landscape has been changing by going away from things like crystal malts, cascade/ctz, huge ibu additions and only using chico.
Everyday I am finding new examples of "new school" "modern" wcipa. As much as purists of the style might balk, these beers are currently some of my favorite to brew/drink, and in my opinion this new iteration of wcipa has a lot left to be explored and discussed.
If you wouldn't mind expanding on the changes in "new school" west coast ipas I'd love to hear about what is different versus traditionaly styled ones
 

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Not trying to be a tampon, but I wouldn’t derail this NEIPA thread talking about WCIPA’s.
 

Dgallo

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*deleted post* didn’t want to discourage anyone from posting here
 
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jturman35

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Wait a minute, What the hell is a West Coast IPA? For some reason I was thinking Brut IPA which is a totally different style due to the dryness.

Sorry for my ignorance, but not sure I even get WCIPA’s down in the Southeast. Also don’t see anything listed under 2015 BJCP guidelines. But they also don’t list NEIPA either. With this said, I do feel this thread is intended for NEIPA style.
 
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VirginiaHops1

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Wait a minute, What the hell is a West Coast IPA? For some reason I was thinking Brut IPA which is a totally different style due to the dryness.

Sorry for my ignorance, but not sure I even get WCIPA’s down in the Southeast. Also don’t see anything listed under 2015 BJCP guidelines. But they also don’t list NEIPA either. With this said, I do feel this thread is intended for NEIPA style.
It's not a BJCP style. Basically the "west coast IPA' moniker came along when brewers took the old school American IPA and decreased the malt/SRM and upped the IBUs and hops. Think Stone and Russian River
 

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I personally wouldnt use the terpene oils only for your dryhop.
The distilled oils i've experimented with are very strong and have a totally different hop character and better used supplemental to dry hop additions.
Also a pain to get them properly mixed in.

I had a barth haas incognito colab as well, it didnt taste any different then the usual beers from the same brewer.

Interested to hear your report.
The beer has been in the keg for two weeks now.

It was one of *those* brew days. 2 hour mash because of dog duties, Incognito was truly messy, OG was short by 17 points!? and I forgot to add yeast nutrient and Whirflock. Only good thing was my new SS immersion chiller worked really well.

I ended up using a drill and mash paddle to get a vigorous whirlpool going at 70c after I managed to get the incognito into the wort. This worked for the most part.

This brings me on to fermentation... 4th gen Omega DIPA decided to throw rihno farts for the first time (WTF). Happened when it got to 1.020ish. Thinking it may have something to do with the lack of copper during chilling, but infection is always possible.

As for the kegged and conditioned beer... Initial samples during the first week were rhino farts front and center in the aroma, and a distinct grain/hop flavour separation. I could easily pick out the Sabro at this point and also the flex (sort of minty) . Currently, the rhino fart aroma has mostly dissipated, and the malt and hops have come together nicely, but to add insult to injury, I add too much of the terpenes (probably 0.3ml too much) and now it's got a slick chemically mouthfeel to it that definitely isn't welcome.

At one point during the terpene dosing period, the beer smelled and tasted like an orange creamcicle which was awesome, but I over did it at the end of the day.

Lesson learned, and next week's brew is featuring Incognito again, new yeast and actual hops for the dry hop.
 

Dgallo

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The beer has been in the keg for two weeks now.

It was one of *those* brew days. 2 hour mash because of dog duties, Incognito was truly messy, OG was short by 17 points!? and I forgot to add yeast nutrient and Whirflock. Only good thing was my new SS immersion chiller worked really well.

I ended up using a drill and mash paddle to get a vigorous whirlpool going at 70c after I managed to get the incognito into the wort. This worked for the most part.

This brings me on to fermentation... 4th gen Omega DIPA decided to throw rihno farts for the first time (WTF). Happened when it got to 1.020ish. Thinking it may have something to do with the lack of copper during chilling, but infection is always possible.

As for the kegged and conditioned beer... Initial samples during the first week were rhino farts front and center in the aroma, and a distinct grain/hop flavour separation. I could easily pick out the Sabro at this point and also the flex (sort of minty) . Currently, the rhino fart aroma has mostly dissipated, and the malt and hops have come together nicely, but to add insult to injury, I add too much of the terpenes (probably 0.3ml too much) and now it's got a slick chemically mouthfeel to it that definitely isn't welcome.

At one point during the terpene dosing period, the beer smelled and tasted like an orange creamcicle which was awesome, but I over did it at the end of the day.

Lesson learned, and next week's brew is featuring Incognito again, new yeast and actual hops for the dry hop.
My guess is it was sulfur from stress. If you run into this issue again with yeast is throwing it, leave it in the fermenter without dry hoping and keep it on the warmer side. It should degas itself and leave the beer
 

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The beer has been in the keg for two weeks now.

It was one of *those* brew days. 2 hour mash because of dog duties, Incognito was truly messy, OG was short by 17 points!? and I forgot to add yeast nutrient and Whirflock. Only good thing was my new SS immersion chiller worked really well.

I ended up using a drill and mash paddle to get a vigorous whirlpool going at 70c after I managed to get the incognito into the wort. This worked for the most part.

This brings me on to fermentation... 4th gen Omega DIPA decided to throw rihno farts for the first time (WTF). Happened when it got to 1.020ish. Thinking it may have something to do with the lack of copper during chilling, but infection is always possible.

As for the kegged and conditioned beer... Initial samples during the first week were rhino farts front and center in the aroma, and a distinct grain/hop flavour separation. I could easily pick out the Sabro at this point and also the flex (sort of minty) . Currently, the rhino fart aroma has mostly dissipated, and the malt and hops have come together nicely, but to add insult to injury, I add too much of the terpenes (probably 0.3ml too much) and now it's got a slick chemically mouthfeel to it that definitely isn't welcome.

At one point during the terpene dosing period, the beer smelled and tasted like an orange creamcicle which was awesome, but I over did it at the end of the day.

Lesson learned, and next week's brew is featuring Incognito again, new yeast and actual hops for the dry hop.
Thanks for reporting back and sorry to hear it didny went without bumps. Live and learn! Good luck with the next brew
 

beervoid

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Hey all

Sorry to get a little off topic, but here are two different beers I brewed, the one on the left is just with IOY Juice and the right is a blend of S33, K97, and WB06. Both were cask conditioned with F2. The grists are fairly similar (basically 38% malted oats, the rest rahr 2 row, Munich II, And carafoam). The SRM for both are 5.5 (next time I’m going higher). The hops on the left are Galaxy, Citra, Mosaic, and Amarillo, the right are Strata, Citra, and Idaho7. I’ve used the recipe on the left and won a competition with it and if I was drinking it by itself, I would crush and love it as a NEIPA.

That being said, the one on the right blows it away in terms of aroma, taste, and color (no, the one on the left is definitely not oxidized). It’s much more tropical fruit all around and reminds me of my favorites from EQ, OH, and monkish. Not quite treehouse yet but I think less hops might make it more like their core beers. Hope this helps in your search of yeast. Cheers!

View attachment 668555
Sounds good but since you used different hops in both batches I wouldnt jump to the conclusion that the yeast combo was making the difference.
Thanks for sharing your experience.
 

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Id say its more about the change from old school pacific northwest ipas like redhook, full sail, sierra nevada, elysian, etc. Base malt with caramel, c type hops, fairly bitter to counter the crystal malt.
Then it becomes lighter by losing the crystal and just using darker base in its place like vienna or munich, or a bit of toasted like victory/aromatic/biscuit. now with some new school hops for a bit of aroma/flavor to mix with the c hops. No more sweet crystal notes so mostly less bitter, but not always. Then Once the ibu wars stop, it becomes about those new school hop flavors, which eventually leads to......neipa.

you dont get to neipa without going thru wcipa. One style jumps off from the other.

id say its not a thread jack, per se. More of a historical review detour.
 

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You really need to disperse the extract. Whirlpool wont cut it. Better to use a pump to really beat it into the wort- think emulsify. Try and dose it right into the pump during whirlpool. A drill might work, but id be a bit skeptical due to fact it’ll cling to paddle, kettle walls, etc.

and then any large pools of it will grab yeast and floc it and drop. You may need to over pitch to get good ferment. (Or normal pitch if you like to typically underpitch). Thats why dispersing it is really important from what we can tell.

wouldn’t surprise me if losing yeast to the oil, plus no nutrients to help it cope caused the stress dgallo mentions.

Ordered terpenoids as well, havent used yet. But you definitely should start by using them as 50% swap for hops to start. Then get bolder if you want. Or at least have some actual hops in the mix. The terps and essences dont provide any mouthfeel at all. Its noticeable when you use them as replacement instead of supplements.
 

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Ordered terpenoids as well, havent used yet. But you definitely should start by using them as 50% swap for hops to start. Then get bolder if you want. Or at least have some actual hops in the mix. The terps and essences dont provide any mouthfeel at all. Its noticeable when you use them as replacement instead of supplements.
50% is way too high in my experience. Look at cryo as a middle step and that is recommended at max 20% of the hopbill to keep flavor close to pellets.
I would say the terpenoids are much lower then this.
 

Dgallo

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Tapped a NE Double IPA 8.7% Thursday evening. Used the last of my Hornindal for it, grain to glass 8 days with a dbl Dh. Hopped with Sabro, Azacca, Mosaic, and Columbus. It was fermented on Pineapple Purée.

First impression is that it’s good but still has hopburn on the finish that takes away from the pineapple. Little to no coconut notes even though I used 4oz of sabro. Will report back
6072356D-530B-444D-BEBF-D073F4BF6BF0.jpeg
 

Wrinkletusk

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You really need to disperse the extract. Whirlpool wont cut it. Better to use a pump to really beat it into the wort- think emulsify. Try and dose it right into the pump during whirlpool. A drill might work, but id be a bit skeptical due to fact it’ll cling to paddle, kettle walls, etc.

and then any large pools of it will grab yeast and floc it and drop. You may need to over pitch to get good ferment. (Or normal pitch if you like to typically underpitch). Thats why dispersing it is really important from what we can tell.

wouldn’t surprise me if losing yeast to the oil, plus no nutrients to help it cope caused the stress dgallo mentions.

Ordered terpenoids as well, havent used yet. But you definitely should start by using them as 50% swap for hops to start. Then get bolder if you want. Or at least have some actual hops in the mix. The terps and essences dont provide any mouthfeel at all. Its noticeable when you use them as replacement instead of supplements.
I hear ya. I wouldn't say I had pools of incognito in the wort, but it wasn't integrated 100%, more like very finely mottled. Fermentation followed the previous three generations to a tee (based on tilt readings), but yeah, stress is definitely a possibility.

I'll give incognito one more try now I know what to expect and what it brings to the table, but I'll be holding way back on the terps.
 

aaronm13

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Tapped a NE Double IPA 8.7% Thursday evening. Used the last of my Hornindal for it, grain to glass 8 days with a dbl Dh. Hopped with Sabro, Azacca, Mosaic, and Columbus. It was fermented on Pineapple Purée.

First impression is that it’s good but still has hopburn on the finish that takes away from the pineapple. Little to no coconut notes even though I used 4oz of sabro. Will report back View attachment 668713
Looks delicious man. What was your grain bill on that one?
 

Dgallo

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Looks delicious man. What was your grain bill on that one?
Ready for this? This was a no boil, dme beer with steeping grains while whirlpooling

6lb Pilsner extra lite dme
3lb Bav. Wheat DME
2lb malted oats steeped
1lb Pilsner malt steeped

Total brew day with clean up 1hr 30 minutes
 

jturman35

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Dgallo I see you bit the bullet and went for it with 4oz of Sabro. Can’t wait to see how your beer turns out.

I just kegged my Simcoe/Amarillo beer last Tuesday. The hydro sample was crushable, however the keg hop gave a touch of hop bite. I had my cleanest transfer with zero clogs. I didn’t rush this beer and kegged it on day 15. I used cryo for the first time in the keg. I’m real stingy with my beer and this is the second half pour.

IMG_9280.JPG
 

aaronm13

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Ready for this? This was a no boil, dme beer with steeping grains while whirlpooling

6lb Pilsner extra lite dme
3lb Bav. Wheat DME
2lb malted oats steeped
1lb Pilsner malt steeped

Total brew day with clean up 1hr 30 minutes
Wow, glad I asked now. Really impressive looking and all cleaned up in 90 minutes, great job. Do you find malted oats better than the flaked/rolled variety? Seen a few people recommend them now.
 
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