English Ales - What's your favorite recipe?

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DBhomebrew

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Which book? Homebrewers Guide to Vintage Beer? Amazon currently has that for $812.05. Barclay Perkins has it for sale, but no price stated. If it's at least an order of magnitude cheaper than Amazon I might order it.
You'll get a price when you click on the buy now button. Looks like 56USD to the States.
 

Golddiggie

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I have two English ales currently on tap. An ordinary bitter (MO, Victory malt and first gold hops) and an English IPA (SMaSH with MO and EKG). Both are great and fermented with Wyeast 1335. I also have a couple of stouts that used 1318. Almost all of the grains I use are from the UK/England. The only two not from the UK are the honey malt and cherrywood smoked malt I use in a couple of recipes.

My base malts are either MO or UK 2 row for all batches/recipes. I'm actually getting ready to start buying sacks of MO, so I'll probably just change my recipes to use that instead of the other 2 row.

I don't alter my water to match what's in the UK. Right now I'm on well water which is actually really good for the beers I'm brewing. Clean tasting right out of the faucet too. I do filter the water to remove sediment, so I don't get granite dust in the beers (or in my kettles).

BTW, "Homebrewers Guide to Vintage Beer" is listing as $11.99 for the Kindle version. I use the Kindle reader app on my non-Kindle tablet.
 

MaxStout

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I saw the 11.99 Kindle version. I kind of like having the paper in hand, so might order from the author's site. I did notice Amazon had used spiral-bound copies, starting at $47, but the condition wasn't very good. I'd rather give the money to the author (and get a signed copy).
 

Golddiggie

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I saw the 11.99 Kindle version. I kind of like having the paper in hand, so might order from the author's site. I did notice Amazon had used spiral-bound copies, starting at $47, but the condition wasn't very good. I'd rather give the money to the author (and get a signed copy).
Got a link for the author's site??
 

Miraculix

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Which book? Homebrewers Guide to Vintage Beer? Amazon currently has that for $812.05. Barclay Perkins has it for sale, but no price stated. If it's at least an order of magnitude cheaper than Amazon I might order it.
I saw that one too :D
 

kmarkstevens

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@MaxStout If you click on the Barclay Perkins buy now button, it takes you to paypal and $55 in the US. I believe that includes shipping PLUS it's signed by Ron. I've got an unsigned one.

Homebrewers Guide to Vintage Beer has a pretty good collection of different recipes and styles. I believe Ron filtered through dozens of recipes and selected one for each inclusion. It's a really good gateway book. Good but not overly verbose commentary. Much easier to flip through the book and find a dozen recipes you want to try than going through the Shut Up site. I give it two thumbs up.
 

Witherby

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@MaxStout If you click on the Barclay Perkins buy now button, it takes you to paypal and $55 in the US. I believe that includes shipping PLUS it's signed by Ron. I've got an unsigned one.

Homebrewers Guide to Vintage Beer has a pretty good collection of different recipes and styles. I believe Ron filtered through dozens of recipes and selected one for each inclusion. It's a really good gateway book. Good but not overly verbose commentary. Much easier to flip through the book and find a dozen recipes you want to try than going through the Shut Up site. I give it two thumbs up.
I have at least 6 of Ron’s books including the Homebrewer’s Guide but if you are on a budget and can only get one I would buy the 1909 Style Guide because of Kristen England's great notes for homebrewers.
 

Erik the Anglophile

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I tasted my Best Bitter brewed with Hulla Norrgård, will let it sit in the fridge for a few days/ a week to let it clear and mature a bit more. But it came out really nice, the hops had a grassy, herbal taste with a little peppery/clove like tone to them, very subtle though and I think they would go well with most English hops.
IMG-20210724-WA0003.jpg

The Brown ale with the domestic yeast came out nice also even though not quite as dry as wanted it at only 70%AA, it had a distinct nutty flavor but next time I will add some biscuit malt also, and mash a little lower and longer since this yeast seems to need some love to attenuate decently. Will try it in a English style Oatmeal Stout next and do a 66c/75min mash and see if I get an AA around 75%.
IMG-20210723-WA0000.jpg

@Miraculix @monkeymath
 
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DuncB

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THis book is a combination of books by several authors.
First is recipes from various brewers and styles.
Second is some extreme brew recipes.
Third is by Ron Pattison ( historical bitters, ipas, stouts, porters) and
then fourth there is a growing for homebrew part, hops and others.

Good value.
 

patto1ro

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THis book is a combination of books by several authors.
First is recipes from various brewers and styles.
Second is some extreme brew recipes.
Third is by Ron Pattison ( historical bitters, ipas, stouts, porters) and
then fourth there is a growing for homebrew part, hops and others.

Good value.
Would have been nice if they'd paid me for it.
 

patto1ro

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Which book? Homebrewers Guide to Vintage Beer? Amazon currently has that for $812.05. Barclay Perkins has it for sale, but no price stated. If it's at least an order of magnitude cheaper than Amazon I might order it.
It's 35 euros in Europe, 45 euros everywhere else. And it's signed.
 

DuncB

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Would have been nice if they'd paid me for it.
Also if they had data checked the other parts of it.
Super hoppy beers might be some peoples cup of tea but I'm not sure what a beer with 45 ounces or 12.8 kg of Columbus hops would taste like in a 60 minute boil.
Certainly won't get you to the intended 30 IBU!!
 

CaddyWampus

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I don’t know how I haven’t found this thread sooner. Unfortunately my area doesn’t get a ton of commercial English beers, but I’ve loved everyone I’ve tried. I’ve attempted a few myself and my favorite by far has been @Miraculix Best recipe.

I have a dark mild scheduled for this weekend and I just ordered Ron Pattinsons 1909 style guide.
 

Miraculix

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I don’t know how I haven’t found this thread sooner. Unfortunately my area doesn’t get a ton of commercial English beers, but I’ve loved everyone I’ve tried. I’ve attempted a few myself and my favorite by far has been @Miraculix Best recipe.

I have a dark mild scheduled for this weekend and I just ordered Ron Pattinsons 1909 style guide.
Thank you very much, I am happy that you like it as much as myself does!

Btw. I have simplified the mash schedule a bit. 60 minutes at 65 degrees Celsius followed by 20 minutes at 77 pretty much does the same thing as the more complicated schedule in the thread.
 

duelerx

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I own 14 of Ron Pattinson's (@patto1ro) books in printed form (most recently AK and Strong! Vol. 2 (already owned Strong! in hardback)), and every one is an invaluable treasure of brewing history and knowledge.
Just recently i listened an interview of Ron Pattinson about AK beers, caught my eye about AK beers that i would like to read the book and brew one sometime.

Also i highly recommend his British Lager series.
 
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Snuffy

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“I used to like Timothy Taylor Landlord. Haven’t been able to find it here in Southern California the past few years.
I’ve brewed a clone a few times loosely based on the Northern Brewer Innkeeper recipe. A great beer!”

AHS has the Tim Taylor clone. I just brewed their Worthington’s White Shield and Bishop’s Finger clones - with Notty - and both are excellent.
 
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DuncB

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Timothy Taylors is not the same as it used to be. Was a superb bottled beer but now is weaker and just not quite the same. Brew a clone and feel you've done better and watch the Timothy Taylors videos very interesting.
 

shoreman

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I’m about to get into some English style recipes and have a big sack of pilsner malt to get through. Any tips on using it in these styles? I’ve made some goldens with EKGs that have worked out with pils and British yeast but not sure if anyone compensates for anything missing in the base malt.
 

Miraculix

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I’m about to get into some English style recipes and have a big sack of pilsner malt to get through. Any tips on using it in these styles? I’ve made some goldens with EKGs that have worked out with pils and British yeast but not sure if anyone compensates for anything missing in the base malt.
Add five percent medium to dark crystal and you won't taste a difference. Maybe also five percent medium invert.

Might be a bit different in a blonde ale. Some people report that adding 20% Munich or Vienna helps to give some breadiness.
 
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cire

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I’m about to get into some English style recipes and have a big sack of pilsner malt to get through. Any tips on using it in these styles? I’ve made some goldens with EKGs that have worked out with pils and British yeast but not sure if anyone compensates for anything missing in the base malt.
There are plenty of current day British ales made from 100% well modified pilsner malt, but as said, just add some darker malt(s) into the mix and you good to go.
 

shoreman

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There are plenty of current day British ales made from 100% well modified pilsner malt, but as said, just add some darker malt(s) into the mix and you good to go.
thanks, can you point me towards a few of them? Doing some research currently 😁
 

cire

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Yes, but they are mostly current day rather than traditional beers and mostly with American hops.

Firstly Jarl which is very pale with Citra hops. Another similar beer is Clasper's Citra. Both are draft beers but also bottled. There are others, but the brewing business is in a state of flux with the pandemic, with some not back to full service. However, several large traditional breweries use very pale malts made to their own specification that for all practical purposes be a lager or Pilsner malt.

A well known RIS is made with about a third of the grain bill being Pilsner malt and I have often made Guinness with it in place of pale malt when you can't really notice much difference.
 

kmarkstevens

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I would consider a small amount of biscuit or melanoidum as well. 3-5%. couple of ounces for 5 gallons. Helps round out the flavor
 

Northern_Brewer

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A nice pic from Simpsons showing the difference in heads between the heritage 6-row landrace bere (left), Golden Promise (middle) and modern variety Laureate (right). They have more about bere on their blog (and various other articles of interest to barley geeks)
1628012113339.png
 

schmurf

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Tapped the 5 Points Bitter clone. I'm not a big fan of fuggles, so not going to be brewing this one again.
Well at least you tried! Personally I love it. I hear now and then people not being a fan of fuggles, more often than other hops.
 

Erik the Anglophile

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Got a question regarding a Scotch ale, not really English but Brittish at least. Been thinking about doing a variant of Skotrat's traquair house ale clone per this recipe Traquair House Ale Clone - Wee Heavy but with MO as base and 1.5% UK chocolate malt.
I scaled down the recipe to my preffered batch size (12L in to fermenter), and after some calculations figured out 2.5L of first runnings would be a reasonable amount to boil down to 3-4 deciliter or so
When I brew this way, do I simply add 2.5L extra to my sparge water to compensate for the wort I boiled down? To me atleast this seems as the most reasonable thing to do but someone else might have brewed something like this using the boil down method and might chime in.
 
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