Priming w/ wort

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ranch

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I had a great brew morning yesterday before class. Had to get up early to heat the strike water but everything went swimmingly and I still made it to my lecture.

Anyway, I brewed a stout and decided to bottle this one, seeing as I don't have nitro and do have hundreds of bottles laying around. Instead of priming with sugar, I snagged about 2.5 cups of the wort and have it sitting in my fridge. My question is, if I want to prime using the wort, how much should I use? It's a 5 gallon batch, and the OG is 1.061. My buddy tells my 2 cups, but I wanted to get more opinions on it seeing as it probably depends on the gravity.

Is this process called krausening or is that something else?

Eat, drink, be merry.

ranch
 

malkore

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krausening I believe is when you take the active krausen from primary and use it to carb an already fermented batch.

I could be wrong though.

I do agree that your question depends on gravity, but gravity is made of fermentable and unfermentable sugars...another variable in the equation.

hopefully someone else here can help better than me :)
 

kvh

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Beer Barons to the rescue (not affiliated, but I downloaded this a while back, and googled it again just now): http://www.beerbarons.org/publications/articles/brewDayCheatSheets/carbonationWort.pdf

If my math is right, it looks like you've got 20 fl oz, which is just about where you want it, perhaps a hair low, but it's better than having too much and blowing up bottles. You could also spike it with a little honey, or molassas, or whatever you like. Just be sure you bring it to a boil again to kill any beasties you may have in there before reintroducing it to the fermented wort.

For what it's worth, I do this too, and have made the habit of pulling it from the kettle after the boil and freezing it in large gallon ziploc bags, double bagged. I lay them on a plate or cookie sheet in the freezer until they turn rock hard, and then just prop them up in the freezer vertically. They take up very little space, and I know they won't mold or spoil no matter how long they're in there. They thaw really quickly, and after a quick boil, I dump them hot right into my keg, right on top of the foam from the sanitizer. Close up, swirl around, and siphon the carboy right in. I probably kill a couple hundred thousand yeasties, but I know the end of what goes in is super rich in yeast, and by then the temp has dropped well below the kill point. Plus it's faster than waiting.

The benefit of kegging, too, is that I can be a lot less careful of my CO2 volumes because it'll equalize itself, and I won't be breaking kegs if I over carb.

And I think perhaps, officially, kreusening is taking different batches of beer and combining the old one (fermented) with a little of the new one (with sugars) right before bottling or kegging. I suppose the same applies if they're from the same batch - I call it this anyway. The actual material saved from the wort is called speice or gyle.

kvh.
 
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