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pasteurizing - post bottling

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cimirie

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Just on a fishing trip here...

I've heard references to some people pasteurizing their beer post-bottling. In theory, this sounds like a good way to sterilize your final product and kill any yeasties if you think you might run the risk of bottle bombs after you're sure you have acheived enough carb in your beer.

In practice, to me it sounds like a good way to see what your kitchen/garage would look like if ever attacked by a grenade barrage.

Does anybody have any experience with this? If it is possible, any ideas on technique? Thanks for the info!
 

McKBrew

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There is no reason to do this. If you maintain proper sanitation and carbonation techniques the chance of a bottle bomb is extremely rare.

Pasteurizing is going to have a detrimental effect on flavor. Not sure how you would pasteurize post bottling as you need to heat up the beer quite a bit to do this, which would as you suggest create a mess.
 

Andri

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:off:
I declare wikipedia a tool of the devil.
I look into food pasteurization, read all about it... then look into ionizing radiation which is used to pasteurize foods. That leads me to Shoe-fitting fluoroscope - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ... shoe fitting fluoroscope which some idiot invented which pretty much emitted radiation to feet of children.
That pretty much leads me to read about x-ray machines ... X-ray machine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Now that leads me to read all about back scattering people x-rays used at airports...
Backscatter X-ray - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It just leads me into reading about useless crap for hours everytime I enter that website

But yeah... I dont know how 140°c will effect your beer, there is such a thing called cold food pasteurizing if you ... have plutonium or something :drunk:
Food irradiation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Boondoggie

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Pasteurizing is going to have a detrimental effect on flavor. Not sure how you would pasteurize post bottling as you need to heat up the beer quite a bit to do this, which would as you suggest create a mess.
Budwieser does it. All the bottles go thru a giant oven...

Not saying it's desireable for a homebrewer, just that that's how they do it.
 

RockfordWhite

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Most breweries do it through a machine that pours very hot water over the bottles then they pour cold water over them... You could do this at home i guess...
 

SpanishCastleAle

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But yeah... I dont know how 140°c will effect your beer, there is such a thing called cold food pasteurizing if you ... have plutonium or something
Food irradiation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
That's it...I'm going AP (All-plutonium) ASAP.
 
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