Minimum town size to support brew pub?

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jgmillr1

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I was wondering if there is any kind of rule of thumb on the minimum population size of an area surrounding a brew pub that is considered necessary to keep the pub operating. I guess the same calculation would apply in estimating whether or not an area is saturated with breweries.

I ask because the town's economic development directory would like a brew pub to open in their main square. The town is the county seat and home to about 5000 people with another roughly 10000 in the outlying county. The area has not seen population growth in decades, however development has been moving its way. There have never been any breweries established there before. The nearest largest city is about 12 miles away with a population of 58000 in which there is one brew pub.

Any suggestions for him would be appreciated.
 

jschein

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I cannot impart any wisdom but I go to many brewpubs with a smaller population. Make a great product and they will do well. Here a couple that I frequent; HOME | westtownbrewworks
 

Qhrumphf

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What's the restaurant situation. That's what I'd be asking. If restaurants do well, no reason a brewpub couldn't.

Local laws with alcohol will also be a big factor that could make a brewpub specifically more or less challenging.
 

Steveruch

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There are a lot of factors that come into play. A town with 5,000 population might support a three barrel brewery but not a 30 barrel one, for instance.
 

jrgtr42

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I don't think it has to do with the size of the town per se, more the demographic. Some small towns can handle a brewpub, other large cities won't support it. If there's a following of craft beer locally, it'd do better than a town that only drinks BMC.
It also comes to the quality of the beer - if a place gets a big following, it may even become a destination in and of itself, where as with sub-par beer even the best location would fail.
 

Jim R

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That seems like a pretty small market to me for any new venture like that. It would take a pretty good business person with deep pockets and the stomach for considerable risk. The most successful brewpubs around us are also good restaurants serving food which is another complicated venture. It will be interesting to see how many of them survive covid.

A recent trend in our area are craft beer pubs and eateries that serve other brewery beers with lots of beer choices. This allows them to avoid the huge expenditure for brewing equipment and brewers but still serve similar craft beer. For me as a consumer there is no difference whether I drink good beer on tap that was made in house versus good beer made somewhere else in the area.
 

grampamark

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I would second the notion that the local demographic plays a big part in answering the question in the OP.

If the locals are into NASCAR, tractor pulls, monster trucks and rodeos, hell yeah. Open two or three brewpubs. If the churches in town outnumber all the bars, restaurants, and Main Street businesses combined-not so much.

I live in Montana, which is one of the leading states in the nation in per-capita alcohol consumption. Any little wide spot in the road town can support a brewpub, or three. The closest “big town” to my farm is almost 70 miles away. It has a population of about 11,000, which is the same as it was 50 years ago when I went to college there. That town supports 3 brewpubs and 1 distillery. That town is also the largest community in over 100 miles in any direction.

Just a guess, but if the local economic development gurus are confident that the church ladies wouldn’t picket the grand opening, I’d say go for it. :cool:
 

danimal92sport

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I would second the notion that the local demographic plays a big part in answering the question in the OP.

If the locals are into NASCAR, tractor pulls, monster trucks and rodeos, hell yeah. Open two or three brewpubs. If the churches in town outnumber all the bars, restaurants, and Main Street businesses combined-not so much.

I live in Montana, which is one of the leading states in the nation in per-capita alcohol consumption. Any little wide spot in the road town can support a brewpub, or three. The closest “big town” to my farm is almost 70 miles away. It has a population of about 11,000, which is the same as it was 50 years ago when I went to college there. That town supports 3 brewpubs and 1 distillery. That town is also the largest community in over 100 miles in any direction.

Just a guess, but if the local economic development gurus are confident that the church ladies wouldn’t picket the grand opening, I’d say go for it. :cool:

That’s good to hear, I would have assumed that communities like you referenced would be good for bars serving BMC beers but not brewpubs.

Dan
 
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jgmillr1

jgmillr1

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Are you native to the town? Makes a huge difference in small towns. With the right last name, you're golden.
I'm outside the town a ways. It sounds like the alcohol licensing piece would be easy. The state requires some sort of restaurant on site for food.

I was going to advise that a small 3bbl brew pub could work but wanted to gather the thoughts of all of you in the broader community. The brewery volume can be scaled down to meet demand but there is a floor below which sales don't support the staffing, insurance, utilities, lease, etc. That's what I was trying to gauge. Perhaps a modest initial restaurant menu would help hedge the risk for a small brew pub.

The town is hungry for a brew pub so there may also be some room for negotiation. Time for a pint
 

mcmeador

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That’s good to hear, I would have assumed that communities like you referenced would be good for bars serving BMC beers but not brewpubs.

Dan

Haha, same here. I was totally expecting him to say, “Hell no,” behind that description. The redneck crowds in my area are definitely the BMC type.

I have a friend who used to run with that crowd back in the day. I remember when I got him to try a Sam Adams at my apartment back then. He warned me he hated beers like that (he was a Coors Light man himself), but I kept pushing him to try it. He finally relented and took a sip and immediately turned and threw up in the kitchen sink and said, “I told you I hate that s***!”
 

Kahler

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Where is it? As a chef with experience all over the country, I can tell you the most important thing is the community wanting to eat what you're selling. If the license involves having a restaurant, what are the sales percentages attached to said license? Like 60% food 40% alcohol, 70/30, is there one? That's a question to ask. Don't put the beer (horse) before the license (wagon). Been there, done that, its not pretty. When you think that alcohol sales will drive food and only focus there, it'll bite you in the ass every time. Your food program will have to as good as your beverage program, if not better.

And who is leasing you the spot? Some places (counties, states) the landlord has way more say in what you do than you want to sign up for.

Just my 2 cents
 

NSMikeD

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I'm outside the town a ways. It sounds like the alcohol licensing piece would be easy. The state requires some sort of restaurant on site for food.

I was going to advise that a small 3bbl brew pub could work but wanted to gather the thoughts of all of you in the broader community. The brewery volume can be scaled down to meet demand but there is a floor below which sales don't support the staffing, insurance, utilities, lease, etc. That's what I was trying to gauge. Perhaps a modest initial restaurant menu would help hedge the risk for a small brew pub.

The town is hungry for a brew pub so there may also be some room for negotiation. Time for a pint
Serving beer and serving beer you make are two different things. Most states prohibit the selling beer you make on site other than a tasting room which then prohibits the restaurant. States are trying to change their laws to permit brew pubs in micro breweries.

Rarely will you hear “easy peasy” describing alcohol. Laws when it comes to breweries operating a brew pub on the brewery site. These laws go back to prohibition when the breweries used to own all the saloons and had an economic interest in keeping towns people inebriated with just their product.
 

IslandLizard

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Your food program will have to as good as your beverage program, if not better.
That ^
Taproom, brewpub, bar, you need to serve food. And it better be good food and good beer people want to come back for.

+1 to the study, and it has to be done well. There are a whole bunch of other things you'd never think of, that need to be uncovered and researched. A good study should reveal most of the important decision making factors, but there's some gut instinct you should not ignore. Maybe your city can pay for (some of) that study, but YOU need to hire and direct who's doing the studies. And be involved, parameters may change as you find things out.

Are you buying the building or leasing? Leases tend to go up, you need to get those locked in and have caps on periodic raises.

For example, Mad Fox, a very good and what looked to be a successful brewery/taproom/restaurant in Falls Church, VA (in the larger DC area) suddenly closed last year, after 9 years, located in their very busy and prominent shopping area. Building was leased of course...
Another similar setup, Barley & Hops, located in a somewhat deserted mall area on the South side of Frederick, MD also closed last year after many years of business. But they got a lot of competition there the past 5 years... Maybe more novel, cutting edge brewing, which is what thrives in our larger MD/NoVA region.

A good idea to look at other communities in your area that have something similar, you can learn much from their setup and success. Talk to the owners.

You also need to orient yourself about everything involved. Visit communities, towns like yours and get a feel for what's needed and what works.

There's a thread around on these forums by a guy building his brewery/taproom/restaurant somewhere in a town in Montana. He's very detailed about the process and all kinds of snafus he encountered. Inspections... neighbors, parking, other businesses.

I tip my hat to a few of my brew friends who have or are building (small) farm breweries. It's a thing here in Maryland, and many regulations are grandfathered in by being on a farm, making the process and licensing somewhat easier. It's still very costly and time consuming. Then most are located off the beaten path, they're farms, so they need to drum up a solidary clientele base.
 
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skidmark

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Would your town EcDev be willing to front a market survey? If you were to approach them with a good concept, you could then say, "Buuuuut, I need to have some information first... "
 

Miraculix

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Do outstanding pub food for moderate prices and the people will come, no matter how your beer is. If you manage to get a decent house pale ale going plus one or two others it'll be even better.
 
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odie

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I have a weekend place in a small town 45 minutes from a major city. Under 1000 population. But every town has additional population outside the city limits and spread thought the county.

They opened 3 years ago with a 3BBL BIAB system and this year installed a 3V 10BBL system.

Probably 90-95% of business is locals. Maybe more.
 

theothermillion

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Does your town have any kind of transient (tourists / vacationers) that come through? I live in a county with around 4000 people and we have a brewery that opened up 2 years ago and they do pretty well. However we have a large amount of transient traffic which I'm sure is what makes it profitable.
 

devilssoninlaw

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I can't add much other than to say there's quite a few breweries here in Northern Michigan in small towns that are doing well and have been around for a while.

Are they getting wealthy? That I couldn't say, but most seem to be keeping their doors open. I feel if you offer a good product at a good price people will support you.
 

odie

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Does your town have any kind of transient (tourists / vacationers) that come through? I live in a county with around 4000 people and we have a brewery that opened up 2 years ago and they do pretty well. However we have a large amount of transient traffic which I'm sure is what makes it profitable.

Yes, it's a weekend destination for many. But the brewery is about 3 miles outside of town and I see mostly locals as a result. I'm there on Saturday's and I just don't see it overrun by the tourists...other than beer snobs...I mean home brewers like us...lol.

Most of the tourists make a beeline for the center of town instead. Old west kinda place, weekend gunfights, walkable main street, antique & gift shops. Well known honky tonks and music venues. Tons of RV parks with a lot of winter Texans.

But for sure, it's not an isolated small town with one gas station and a singular beer joint.
 

TheMadKing

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My home town in Washington state supports a small brewery with a population of ~1100. Part of their success is a feeling of community and loyalty to the "hometown brewery" which the owners enhanced by reviving the name of the historic pre-prohibition brewery that shut down.

They don't offer food, but have partnered with the pizza place next door and have a covered walkway to carry beer and pizza back and forth and are constantly hosting live music from local and non-local artists, they have both kinds of music country AND western

Having grown up in a small town, you need to appeal to the right groups of people with your vibe. Small town breweries usually have 2 distinct groups: the hippy/craft beer lover and the rougher working class, grab a pint after hunting all morning and watch the game type.

Hope that's helpful
 

bwible

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Where is it? As a chef with experience all over the country, I can tell you the most important thing is the community wanting to eat what you're selling. If the license involves having a restaurant, what are the sales percentages attached to said license? Like 60% food 40% alcohol, 70/30, is there one? That's a question to ask. Don't put the beer (horse) before the license (wagon). Been there, done that, its not pretty. When you think that alcohol sales will drive food and only focus there, it'll bite you in the ass every time. Your food program will have to as good as your beverage program, if not better.

And who is leasing you the spot? Some places (counties, states) the landlord has way more say in what you do than you want to sign up for.

Just my 2 cents
This is my take as well. People tend to think of a brewpub as a brewery with a restaurant attached or a brewery with a restaurant as a side business. I’d say the successful ones are the other way around - a solid restaurant first and the brewery is actually the side operation. People will come for the food and also have beer while they are there.

Some places do themes, like a biergarten with German food can be a draw, and then beer sells naturally. I visited a place like this on a recent trip to the other side of the state to attend a relative’s wedding, and I can only say I wish I had such a place near me. I’d be there several times a month. Or a real British type pub with British food and a British phone booth and beer on handpumps. We have one of those maybe 2 hours away but its a destination. If it wasn’t so far away and not for drinking and driving I’d be there more. There is a chain I’ve been to a few times called Elephant & Castle. I think the nearest one to me is in Washington, DC. I’m in PA outside of Philadelphia.

That said, our local brewpubs and wineries either have a kitchen they sell food out of, or they sometimes get around the requirement by having a food truck available at events and such. Local businesses can work together.
 
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brewpharm Hill

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I was wondering if there is any kind of rule of thumb on the minimum population size of an area surrounding a brew pub that is considered necessary to keep the pub operating. I guess the same calculation would apply in estimating whether or not an area is saturated with breweries.

I ask because the town's economic development directory would like a brew pub to open in their main square. The town is the county seat and home to about 5000 people with another roughly 10000 in the outlying county. The area has not seen population growth in decades, however development has been moving its way. There have never been any breweries established there before. The nearest largest city is about 12 miles away with a population of 58000 in which there is one brew pub.

Any suggestions for him would be appreciated.

Build it and they will come... if the beer is great and the food is to match you'll be fine!
 

Brooothru

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That ^
Taproom, brewpub, bar, you need to serve food. And it better be good food and good beer people want to come back for.

+1 to the study, and it has to be done well. There are a whole bunch of other things you'd never think of, that need to be uncovered and researched. A good study should reveal most of the important decision making factors, but there's some gut instinct you should not ignore. Maybe your city can pay for (some of) that study, but YOU need to hire and direct who's doing the studies. And be involved, parameters may change as you find things out.

Are you buying the building or leasing? Leases tend to go up, you need to get those locked in and have caps on periodic raises.

For example, Mad Fox, a very good and what looked to be a successful brewery/taproom/restaurant in Falls Church, VA (in the larger DC area) suddenly closed last year, after 9 years, located in their very busy and prominent shopping area. Building was leased of course...
Another similar setup, Barley & Hops, located in a somewhat deserted mall area on the South side of Frederick, MD also closed last year after many years of business. But they got a lot of competition there the past 5 years... Maybe more novel, cutting edge brewing, which is what thrives in our larger MD/NoVA region.

A good idea to look at other communities in your area that have something similar, you can learn much from their setup and success. Talk to the owners.

You also need to orient yourself about everything involved. Visit communities, towns like yours and get a feel for what's needed and what works.

There's a thread around on these forums by a guy building his brewery/taproom/restaurant somewhere in a town in Montana. He's very detailed about the process and all kinds of snafus he encountered. Inspections... neighbors, parking, other businesses.

I tip my hat to a few of my brew friends who have or are building (small) farm breweries. It's a thing here in Maryland, and many regulations are grandfathered in by being on a farm, making the process and licensing somewhat easier. It's still very costly and time consuming. Then most are located off the beaten path, they're farms, so they need to drum up a solidary clientele base.
Lizard-

Spot on regarding Barley and Hops. We used to stop by after shopping trips to FSK Mall and nearby areas. Beer was good, food 'passable'. Was shocked recently to see the place shuttered. The arrival of BJ's on the FSK campus certainly contributed, but Covid (as well as the dying "mall culture") was likely the nail in the coffin. I remember the original Battle of the Brews being sponsored by Barley and Hops. Hopefully Brewer's Alley downtown and their affiliated Monacacy Brewing can survive the pandemic. Hard times for businesses in the food and beverage industry.

Brooo Brother
 

Cyclman

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I am semi-retired, but we all fantasize of such things. My thoughts, as a 20 year business executive:
Work in a brewery / brewpub first, the experience will be educational and invaluable. Needless to say, become a champion brewer.
Establish an extensive business plan, include all costs, with extra, what is your minimum revenue to break even, how long to reach that, conservatively. What is contribution margin per pint, upside of exceeding break even? Can you cash flow a doubling in business (could happen, growth kills businesses unprepared for it).
Own, don’t borrow. Leverage is great for large corporations with diversified operations, it kills small businesses. Too many eggs in one basket.
If all planning goes well, looks good, you need to do two full time + jobs at once: opening a brewery / brewing / running a business, and Marketing. I think too many love home brewing, but not business (accounting, taxes, benefits, legal, compliance), or Marketing (branding, promotion, advertising). Fail at any of these, you could lose everything you invested.
If all this sounds exciting and you have the capital, pursue it. If any of it turns your stomach, run! The thing you hate the most could come to dominate your psyche. You will need to be a jack of all trades, and at the end of the day love it.
One other thing, look for a bankrupt brewpub who bought great, new equipment, but were poor business people, lots of deals out there due to this.
 

TheMadKing

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I am semi-retired, but we all fantasize of such things. My thoughts, as a 20 year business executive:
Work in a brewery / brewpub first, the experience will be educational and invaluable. Needless to say, become a champion brewer.
Establish an extensive business plan, include all costs, with extra, what is your minimum revenue to break even, how long to reach that, conservatively. What is contribution margin per pint, upside of exceeding break even? Can you cash flow a doubling in business (could happen, growth kills businesses unprepared for it).
Own, don’t borrow. Leverage is great for large corporations with diversified operations, it kills small businesses. Too many eggs in one basket.
If all planning goes well, looks good, you need to do two full time + jobs at once: opening a brewery / brewing / running a business, and Marketing. I think too many love home brewing, but not business (accounting, taxes, benefits, legal, compliance), or Marketing (branding, promotion, advertising). Fail at any of these, you could lose everything you invested.
If all this sounds exciting and you have the capital, pursue it. If any of it turns your stomach, run! The thing you hate the most could come to dominate your psyche. You will need to be a jack of all trades, and at the end of the day love it.
One other thing, look for a bankrupt brewpub who bought great, new equipment, but were poor business people, lots of deals out there due to this.

I can't agree with this more. I am a junior partner in a small business where marketing and all the day to day (benefits, payroll, licensing, rate calculations etc) had all taken a back seat to the work. It's been an expensive trial by fire to get us back to where we should be and a huge learning experience for me. I realize now that I love brewing, and running a business isn't the worst thing in the world if you can nail down all of the requirements that apply to your business. So once capital and a business plan become a reality, I may go pro some day as well.

Side note, marketing is worth hiring professional help if you can afford it. It's not my Forte, but I fully recognize the need for it. Look at Brew Dog. They make mediocre beer with some exceptions (don't hate me!) but their marketing has built a cult like following that sells their beer.
 

danimal92sport

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Cle Elum Washington has two, with a population of 2,000. So I say you need a town of 1,000. :)

Cle Elum is beautiful, is along a decent sized hwy, and is a destination for some, so that’s in line with what someone posted earlier about getting business from visitors or folks passing through.
 

VikeMan

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Most states prohibit the selling beer you make on site other than a tasting room which then prohibits the restaurant.

Maybe it's just luck of the draw, but every state I have been to permits both beer and food sales at breweries. Hell, PA requires it, i.e. no beer sales without food sales. What constitutes "most states?"
 

Qhrumphf

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Not allowing onsite sales is at this point a slim minority. Seems like worst case left is having to sell to a middleman and buy back (is that still the case in Mississippi and Alabama?) but that's not common any more either. As said, some states require food even in a taproom setting. Some breweries do the bare minimum (sometimes very deliberately, saw a "xyz state compliance menu" from a brewery, maybe Indiana, that was "$15 hot dog microwaved to perfection, no bun, $10 can of unheated soup, $20 can of condensed milk" or something to that effect)

Others have nailed it. For a brewpub to be successful it has to be a viable restaurant first. The beer is the extra.

And also demonstrates that alcohol production and sale is complicated legally. Federal, state, and local regulations to deal with.
 

mcmeador

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I don’t know that you would have to sell food to do well as a business, but I do think you need food in the immediate vicinity. For example, there’s a beer bar in a city not too far from where I live that doesn’t serve food, but they’re sandwiched between a pizza place and a burger place, so people will buy food at one of the two and take it to the bar to eat with their beers. They seem to be doing really well. A small brewery has actually just opened up next to it as well with the same deal. Get food at one of the places on either side and you’re welcome to eat it onsite with your beverages.

Most of the breweries in my city just feature rotating food trucks rather than serve food themselves, but that’s probably not an option in a small town.

With that said, when I hear the term “brewpub,” I assume it is primarily a restaurant that also brews beer. If that’s what the OP’s town is looking for, then I guess whether or not you can do it without selling food is a moot point.
 

mcmeador

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Not allowing onsite sales is at this point a slim minority. Seems like worst case left is having to sell to a middleman and buy back (is that still the case in Mississippi and Alabama?) but that's not common any more either. As said, some states require food even in a taproom setting. Some breweries do the bare minimum (sometimes very deliberately, saw a "xyz state compliance menu" from a brewery, maybe Indiana, that was "$15 hot dog microwaved to perfection, no bun, $10 can of unheated soup, $20 can of condensed milk" or something to that effect)

Others have nailed it. For a brewpub to be successful it has to be a viable restaurant first. The beer is the extra.

And also demonstrates that alcohol production and sale is complicated legally. Federal, state, and local regulations to deal with.

Your ridiculous menu options reminded me of how a local bar was complying with COVID restrictions that mandated that bars require any customer purchasing alcohol to also purchase food. They offered a single 50-cent onion ring to meet the food requirement so that they could continue operating as a bar.

Related to your comment on MS, I learned from a brewery that I recently visited there that they are limited in the amount of alcohol they can sell onsite. I think only 10% of your total sales can be served onsite. They can circumvent the restriction by selling a “tasting” of several beers (basically a flight) and a “tour” of the tiny brewery. Whatever beer they serve in the tasting doesn’t get counted toward their 10% cap. If you want a pint, they’ll just ring it up as a “half-tasting” and give you 3 tastings of the same beer in one cup lol. They talk about it very openly as if the state doesn’t really care, which raises the question why these dumb laws exist in the first place.
 

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Man I looked up Sheridan, IN because I thought it sounded familiar. I must have remembered it since it it is the current north end of the Monon trail. I couldn't even find a grocery store in town, then found an article from 2015 about the last one closing. I can't imagine that if the demographics can't support even a small grocery that they would support a brewery.
 

Qhrumphf

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Your ridiculous menu options reminded me of how a local bar was complying with COVID restrictions that mandated that bars require any customer purchasing alcohol to also purchase food. They offered a single 50-cent onion ring to meet the food requirement so that they could continue operating as a bar.

Related to your comment on MS, I learned from a brewery that I recently visited there that they are limited in the amount of alcohol they can sell onsite. I think only 10% of your total sales can be served onsite. They can circumvent the restriction by selling a “tasting” of several beers (basically a flight) and a “tour” of the tiny brewery. Whatever beer they serve in the tasting doesn’t get counted toward their 10% cap. If you want a pint, they’ll just ring it up as a “half-tasting” and give you 3 tastings of the same beer in one cup lol. They talk about it very openly as if the state doesn’t really care, which raises the question why these dumb laws exist in the first place.

Because the National Beer Wholesaler's Association (the lobby for distributors, ie the aforementioned middlemen) is a huge political monetary force. On par with the NRA. A lot of Prohibition-era restrictions no longer needed are the only thing keeping the distributor industry in business and they fight hard to keep that three tier system alive.
 

mcmeador

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Because the National Beer Wholesaler's Association (the lobby for distributors, ie the aforementioned middlemen) is a huge political monetary force. On par with the NRA. A lot of Prohibition-era restrictions no longer needed are the only thing keeping the distributor industry in business and they fight hard to keep that three tier system alive.

Well the point was if the state is allowing breweries to circumvent the rules so easily, it doesn’t really make sense to have those rules at all. The rules can’t be doing much to help the big distributors if they have no real effect. I guess they’re not lobbying hard enough!
 
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NTBeer

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What are the already existing bars in the area selling? If it's just BMC, is that because that's all the market wants? Do they only offer craft in bottles because there isn't enough demand for a tap?

Food is very important. Just my example, but my wife will not set foot in a taproom without food. Your revenue just dropped from a $100 check for 2 people to $20 for one. Liquor laws will determine this, but if it's possible you also should have wine or other options for those not into beer. More options (within reason) equals fewer reasons for members of groups to say no, and thus more potential revenue.
 
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jgmillr1

jgmillr1

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Some breweries do the bare minimum (sometimes very deliberately, saw a "xyz state compliance menu" from a brewery, maybe Indiana, that was "$15 hot dog microwaved to perfection, no bun, $10 can of unheated soup, $20 can of condensed milk" or something to that effect)
Yup, those are the rules set down by the excise police in indiana. Go figure.
Man I looked up Sheridan, IN because I thought it sounded familiar. I must have remembered it since it it is the current north end of the Monon trail. I couldn't even find a grocery store in town, then found an article from 2015 about the last one closing. I can't imagine that if the demographics can't support even a small grocery that they would support a brewery.

Yeah, Sheridan is going through a death and will be a bedroom community to westfield in the near future. We had considered a brewpub here but thought better of it for now

The town that is looking for the brewpub is Tipton, about 10 miles from here. Similar problems but better short term prospects.
 

couchsending

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Arguably the best craft brewery in the world exists in a town of 232 people, On a dirt road, 20+ miles from the nearer stop light, with literally zero signage. People fly from all corners of the globe to go there.

Brew amazing beer and have an authentic, well executed brand and people will come from miles around.

Brew forgettable beer and create a forgettable brand and try to survive just cause you’re the only option, don’t bother.
 

kmarkstevens

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Listen to this basic brewing podcast with Casey Latellier, who founded Ivory Bill Brewing. Links are at the bottom of this page: Basic Brewing™ : Home Brewing Beer Podcast and DVD - Basic Brewing Radio™ 2019

TL:DR, Casey opened the first small brewery in small town Arkansas, which doesn't yet have a strong craft beer culture. Notice his naming conventions and the type of beers he brews. How Ivory Bill is bringing along their audience along from those that think a Michelob Dark is exotic into the local brewed beer scene. In other words, know your audience. Local population around 18,000. By all reports, they are doing a good business even in the Covid era.

January 3, 2019 - Ivory Bill Brewing
We visit Ivory Bill Brewing in Siloam Springs, Arkansas, where long-time friend of the podcast, Casey Letellier, and his partner, Dorothy Hall, are serving up delicious open-fermented, gluten-reduced, English-inspired beers.
 

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