Keg or Bottle?

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kdsarch

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Question. Are most people kegging or bottling their beer? I am considering going to kegging since I am getting tired of all the work associated with bottling. It seems like it would be a lot easier.

If you are kegging, are you filtering your beer as well?

Just wondering.
 

EdWort

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Bottling is PIA. I keg and I don't filter. I do crash cool my primary before kegging.
 

McKBrew

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I'm getting ready to make the switch to kegging. Based on the expense factor alone there are likely more people bottling, but just about everyone dreams of kegging someday. As far as filtering, there aren't many people who have that equipment as well. There are several techniques associated with kegging that minimize the amount of sediment in beer.
 

Blender

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I just started kegging and love it. If you have the means then I would recommend it. My beers are really clear so don't worry about filtering.
 

DRAGGER

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I have been brewing for a year and have NEVER bottled my sensei told me that if I have to mone to go directly to kegging FORGET bottling...... Sensei then taught me how to bottle a few from the keg once carbed.....

DRAGGER.....
 

Adam's Apples

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DRAGGER said:
I have been brewing for a year and have NEVER bottled my sensei told me that if I have to mone to go directly to kegging FORGET bottling...... Sensei then taught me how to bottle a few from the keg once carbed.....

DRAGGER.....
Dragger, how do you manage to bottle from the keg once carbed? I tried this so my friends could taste my last brew, but by the time they opened the bottle a couple of hours later the beer was dead flat.

I should point out that, for the time being while saving pennies, I keg into the plastic barrels with a tap on, rather than using the cornelius kegs to which you chaps are probably referring .
 

mummasan

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search for - we need no stinkin beer gun - and follow the directions
 

Brew-boy

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No more bottles for me I keg everything. The only time I still bottle is with my Beergun to enter comps, what a great device that is. My beer is crystal clear no need to filter but I do crash cool as others.
 

EinGutesBier

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McKBrew said:
I'm getting ready to make the switch to kegging. Based on the expense factor alone there are likely more people bottling, but just about everyone dreams of kegging someday. As far as filtering, there aren't many people who have that equipment as well. There are several techniques associated with kegging that minimize the amount of sediment in beer.
Not to be disagreeable, but I don't dream of kegging. :ban:

Here's the way I see it:

1.) Costs (CO2, initial investment, etc.)

2.) Pacing. I could keep on drafting my beer and drain the keg within a week and not be any wiser. If I bottle, I can see, say, three empty bottles and think, "Hm...3 already? I'd better call it good."

3.) Long-term storage. I believe that bottles are better for long-term storage. Just toss them into a box and put in a basement shelf. Bam. Done. Though I can't say from experience, I believe that the beer has a better chance of improving while sitting in a nice brown bottle.

4.) Carbonation. In my mind, there's no rival to natural carbonation. Though I'm sure there are folks who do the Real Ale thing with their kegs, I think it's probably easier to do it with bottles.

That said, yeah, bottling can become a PITA. Like all things, though, you get used to it and now when it comes time to bottling, I hardly even think about it. When I first started, I had to have a couple just to deal with it, not to mention the sweating. Now I could do it in my sleep...without the sweat. :rockin:

Just my .02.
 
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i've been kegging for a few months and love it. i didn't bottle for very long, but when i did bottle 100% of my batch it really wasn't that much of a pain. i suppose now i have to answers the numbered points:

1. yep, it costs money. more money on top of the money we've already spent. a CO2 cylinder and regulator will total about $100- $150, corny kegs are at least $25 and often as much as $40, and then you have to replace all the orings for $5 per keg. your kegerator or keezer will cost at least $100, depending, and add another $50 or so for each faucet and parts needed. that's a lot of money. if you can't afford it that sucks, but if you can then it might be an expense you're willing to endure.

2. most adults are able to ration their own consumption and even keep a count inside their own heads!! if you can't, see here.

3. i always bottle at least a 6pack for the vault and for comps, etc. it's very easy to do, even easier than bottling from a bottling bucket. see here.

4. like you mentioned, natural carbonation can be done in a keg, but i don't see how bottle conditioning is better than forced carbonation. the CO2 doesn't know where it came from. i can say that with bottle conditioning you must wait for the yeasties to finish their business. i just racked a porter into a keg last night, gave it 35 psi, and went to shake it during commercials while i watched a movie. left it on the gas overnight and i'm drinking one right now. delicious.
 

SuperiorBrew

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I bottled one batch and went to kegs, no filtering, usually no secondary, just crash cool & keg.
I only bottle with my beergun so I can give some to friends.
 

EinGutesBier

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SenorWanderer said:
i've been kegging for a few months and love it. i didn't bottle for very long, but when i did bottle 100% of my batch it really wasn't that much of a pain. i suppose now i have to answers the numbered points:

1. yep, it costs money. more money on top of the money we've already spent. a CO2 cylinder and regulator will total about $100- $150, corny kegs are at least $25 and often as much as $40, and then you have to replace all the orings for $5 per keg. your kegerator or keezer will cost at least $100, depending, and add another $50 or so for each faucet and parts needed. that's a lot of money. if you can't afford it that sucks, but if you can then it might be an expense you're willing to endure.

2. most adults are able to ration their own consumption and even keep a count inside their own heads!! if you can't, see here.

3. i always bottle at least a 6pack for the vault and for comps, etc. it's very easy to do, even easier than bottling from a bottling bucket. see here.

4. like you mentioned, natural carbonation can be done in a keg, but i don't see how bottle conditioning is better than forced carbonation. the CO2 doesn't know where it came from. i can say that with bottle conditioning you must wait for the yeasties to finish their business. i just racked a porter into a keg last night, gave it 35 psi, and went to shake it during commercials while i watched a movie. left it on the gas overnight and i'm drinking one right now. delicious.
Number two was supposed to be an attempt at humor. :D I pace myself well, especially with conserving my homebrews, but I still think there might be a little truth to that.

In regard to natural carbonation, the reason I like it, is the mouthfeel. The carbonation is velvety, not prickly, like CO2 carbonation. Just a preference. I'm sure there are as many who prefer CO2 over natural carbonation. In my opinion, it's worth the wait.

With everything else, I agree with you entirely. Thanks for offering your POV - I was curious as to your, and other kegger's, thoughts.
 
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i was joking too, my man. i definitely find my self lifting kegs to feel their weight. i have gotten pretty good and feeling when it's getting down to the bottom and it's time to bottle a few for posterity. i honestly can't say i can feel or taste a difference between carbonation methods. i do know that taste-killing, prickly feeling you're talking about, but i think that's just OVER carbonation. i also get that a little bit from freshly carbonated beers. after i bleed off the big pressure and put it on serving pressure and the keg has sat for a couple days its just like any other mouthfeel. anyone else "feel" a difference? i'm very curious about this. i think the next time i do a 10g batch i'll force carb one keg and prime the other.
 

menschmaschine

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I'm one of the few who actually doesn't mind bottling. Nothing against kegging of course... I may do it some day. But for now, bottling is fine for me.
 
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