Will Cold-Crashing in the Fermenter Result in Less Sediment in the Keg?

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Franktalk

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I recently purchased a pressure safe fermenter. So now I spund in the fermenter to 15 psi and then crash to 2 degrees C for three days.

I often travel and take kegs with me for events and parties, and in the past I would end up with yeasty, hazy beers when I arrived. Then I started transferring to a serving keg before traveling, and that helped. But, It also made we wonder if the little bit of oxygen that gets in each time I keg would mean that I am just helping it to proliferate when the beer is sloshing in the car on the trip.

So, I feel that cold-crashing will be the best of the three scenarios above. So my question is: Will Cold-Crashing in the Fermenter Result in Less Sediment in the Keg? Therefore, giving me a clearer beer when I travel with it in the keg
 
So my question is: Will Cold-Crashing in the Fermenter Result in Less Sediment in the Keg? Therefore, giving me a clearer beer when I travel with it in the keg

Assuming your method of transfer from your fermenter to your keg doesn't stir up the trub, and assuming a successful/adequate cold crash, then yes, you'll have less stuff reaching the keg (or bottle or whatever). That's really the purpose of cold crashing.
 
As long as you can cold crash without pulling in O2 or sanitizer it will help with sediment, but you'll inevitably get some as the keg settles.

Try using a bouncer filter when transferring to keg. It has helped my beer clear faster and reduce the amount of sediment in the keg immensely.
 
As long as you can cold crash without pulling in O2 or sanitizer it will help with sediment, but you'll inevitably get some as the keg settles.

Try using a bouncer filter when transferring to keg. It has helped my beer clear faster and reduce the amount of sediment in the keg immensely.
Yeah, the fermenter is pressurized when I cold-crash, so there's no suck-back of air.

The bouncer filter is cool! I have never seen it before. I'll definitely take a look at one of those.
 
Filtering provides more things to O2-purge and sanitize and all that stuff, I've never found it necessary after a cold-crash. It's an advantage of fermenting in clear vessels that I can do a closed-transfer racking without picking up significant amounts of trub, yeast or hop debris, simply by not sticking my SS racking cane end in any of that. When I tap a keg I get maybe 2 ounces of cloudy beer then bright beer immediately thereafter, there's no protracted clearing. And so my kegs kick with just a coating of debris on the bottom...

Cheers!
 
Cold crashing definitely helps, but a floating diptube, (with or without a screen on the end) helps even more. To avoid sediment, I adjusted my batch size to always finish at 6 gallons or so, use a floating diptube and first beer transfered goes into a 5 gallon keg and the remains go either in a baby keg or PET bottle with the carb caps and tee on the top...that's the beer that'll have the sediment (if there is any) so I keep that one to myself to relax with after I'm finished cleaning up. :p
Look up those crash-guardians or whatever they're called to avoid suckback of O2.
PS: Are you purging your transfer lines?
I used that same video @Red over White posted as a rough guide way back, and though I can vouch for the filter itself, I went through a whole sanitizing and purging routine that is not in that video. ...I actually kind got in sh*t on here for posting it cause the guy sloshes his beer around with a horrible hose-in-open-keg-siphon. Properly purged though, that filter makes for very clear beer, but isn't really worth the bother when just using a floating diptube, optionally cold crashing, and optionally not drawing the last inch or so, is enough to make for clear beer (provided you had the patience to wait till it's fully settled).
 
Cold crashing definitely helps, but a floating diptube, (with or without a screen on the end) helps even more. To avoid sediment, I adjusted my batch size to always finish at 6 gallons or so, use a floating diptube and first beer transfered goes into a 5 gallon keg and the remains go either in a baby keg or PET bottle with the carb caps and tee on the top...that's the beer that'll have the sediment (if there is any) so I keep that one to myself to relax with after I'm finished cleaning up. :p
Look up those crash-guardians or whatever they're called to avoid suckback of O2.
PS: Are you purging your transfer lines?
I used that same video @Red over White posted as a rough guide way back, and though I can vouch for the filter itself, I went through a whole sanitizing and purging routine that is not in that video. ...I actually kind got in sh*t on here for posting it cause the guy sloshes his beer around with a horrible hose-in-open-keg-siphon. Properly purged though, that filter makes for very clear beer, but isn't really worth the bother when just using a floating diptube, optionally cold crashing, and optionally not drawing the last inch or so, is enough to make for clear beer (provided you had the patience to wait till it's fully settled).
This is what I would recommend. The more you add into your transfer process, the more likely you will introduce oxygen into your beer and spoil it. Cold crash, then closed transfer into a keg with a floating dip tube. You'll get a clean beer that lasts a loooooong time and tastes like it should!
 
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