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BrewinSoldier

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By the way, anyone have a reliable 5 Gallon Beersmith 2 profile for the Grainfather they can share? I've seen a few variations but they're all based on 28 Liter boil volumes (or is this intentional?)
That is because you lose 1.4 gallons to Trub and boiloff that stays in the bottom. That's where the filter cuts off and stops pumping(which is intentional and you want to leave that in the Grainfather). That's figuring a 6 gallon finished batch into the fermenter. If you want 5.5 into the fermenter, then it's 6.9 gallons. Just depends on what size batches you are making. I change mine based on what I'm making, (for example IPAs I always get 6 into the fermenter, the pilsner I just made doesn't have any dry hops, but I'm adding cucumber so I did 5.5 into the fermenter.
 

RockyMountainCraftBrewing

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My two most recent GF brews are ready for kegging! Ones a citrus wit and the other Gavins Mighty Helles. Not hard to tell which one had gelatin added eh? Looking forward to tasting these very soon.View attachment 401457
I suggest you get rid of the glass carboys and ferment in corny kegs since you keg your beer.The gas post makes for a perfect blow off and all you need to do is cut the liquid tube by about 4 inches.No worry about sunlight and the yeast drops right to the bottom.Simply cold crash and hook up the CO2 and force transfer into a serving keg.Never will you worry about a broken glass carboy again.

RMCB
 

benner_28

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Hmm, alright. I'll keep the mentioned points in mind. Next beer is gonna be a big one again (Delirium Tremens clone), so I'll adjust my efficiency downward to make sure, maybe 70%.
Mind sharing your clone recipe? I love that beer!
 

BrewinSoldier

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Just curious but is anyone consistently getting over attenuating beers with their Grainfather? For the life of me ever since I stopped using my 3 vessel and only using my Grainfather, my beers are finishing way low and making my IPAs very bitter and dry with no malt sweetness to back it up. I mash at 153-154 but I'm starting to think I need to bump it up to 158 range.
 

BrewBrains

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Just curious but is anyone consistently getting over attenuating beers with their Grainfather? For the life of me ever since I stopped using my 3 vessel and only using my Grainfather, my beers are finishing way low and making my IPAs very bitter and dry with no malt sweetness to back it up. I mash at 153-154 but I'm starting to think I need to bump it up to 158 range.
I was just thinking along similar lines, as I had noticed I didn't seem to get a fuller body on my last hefeweizen than the previous batch by doing the sach rest at 154 as opposed to 149. I think the problem might be doing step mashes via the temperature mash in the GF as opposed to the infusion method? BrewinSoldier, did you do a lower temp rest 1st, like a protein or ferrulic acid rest that I did for my beer? Does anyone else find this is an issue because you're taking the mash thru the beta amylase range on the ramp up to the alpha range? I'm thinking you need to dump the grains in when the mash water is already at the sacharification rest temp in order to hit the body you want for that beer. Is anyone actually adding hotter water to do a step mash?
 

BrewinSoldier

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I was just thinking along similar lines, as I had noticed I didn't seem to get a fuller body on my last hefeweizen than the previous batch by doing the sach rest at 154 as opposed to 149. I think the problem might be doing step mashes via the temperature mash in the GF as opposed to the infusion method? BrewinSoldier, did you do a lower temp rest 1st, like a protein or ferrulic acid rest that I did for my beer? Does anyone else find this is an issue because you're taking the mash thru the beta amylase range on the ramp up to the alpha range? I'm thinking you need to dump the grains in when the mash water is already at the sacharification rest temp in order to hit the body you want for that beer. Is anyone actually adding hotter water to do a step mash?
I don't ever usually do a step mash. I get my mash water usually 6° or so above where I want to mash, and the grain when I dough in brings it to 153-154. In winter when the grain is colder, I'll go 10° or so above to hit my target mash temp. The only beer I've done a step mash with was for a Cucumber Pilsner I just brewed using 100% floor malted bohemian pilsner malt. I held it at 130 or so for 20 mins I think, then bumped it to 152ish for the rest. Sometimes I'll do a mashout at 170 for 10mins but I think I'm just going to start doing that from now on to prevent any further conversion. I also read on a forum that some people who were having problems with thin or dry over attenuating beers, then changed to a shorter mash time of like 40 mins and it solved their problems. I just made and brewed a recipe up for a Focal Banger Clone so I want to see how it finishes. I used 1318 yeast and that specific yeast isn't a very high attenuating strain, so we shall see what happens. Next IPA I make will be mashed at 158-160 and I'm going to keep taking temps at the top and in the actual grain bed with my thermapen to compare to the bottom reading temp probe. I'm wondering if the flucuation of temp is what might be throwing it off if they are at actual different temps(so might be mashing lower than what the controller is reading). One problem I have on every batch with the grainfather​ is that I feel like the wort isn't circulating through the grain very well, even with 1/2lb of rice hulls. It ALWAYS puts a ton down the overflow pipe instead of through the grain where it should be going. I keep playing with my grain crush size as well opening it up hoping it will improve the flow as well as my efficiency (currently around 70%).
 

Teesquar

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One problem I have on every batch with the grainfather​ is that I feel like the wort isn't circulating through the grain very well, even with 1/2lb of rice hulls. It ALWAYS puts a ton down the overflow pipe instead of through the grain where it should be going. I keep playing with my grain crush size as well opening it up hoping it will improve the flow as well as my efficiency (currently around 70%).
Have you tried conditioning the grains before running them through the mill? It adds about 20 minutes to the prebrew process but it allows the grain hulls to create their own filter media.

My Barley Crusher is set at .039" and my current batch of Festbier looks like it'll be coming in at around 85% efficiency, a few points higher than the anticipated 82%. The wort ran clear around 45 minutes in and the sparge was perfect. The overflow seemed a little quick at first, but settled down later in the mash.

https://www.brewstat.us/share/958/festbier
 

BrewinSoldier

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Have you tried conditioning the grains before running them through the mill? It adds about 20 minutes to the prebrew process but it allows the grain hulls to create their own filter media.

My Barley Crusher is set at .039" and my current batch of Festbier looks like it'll be coming in at around 85% efficiency, a few points higher than the anticipated 82%. The wort ran clear around 45 minutes in and the sparge was perfect. The overflow seemed a little quick at first, but settled down later in the mash.

https://www.brewstat.us/share/958/festbier
What temp were you mashing at?
 

Kampenken

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That is because you lose 1.4 gallons to Trub and boiloff that stays in the bottom. That's where the filter cuts off and stops pumping(which is intentional and you want to leave that in the Grainfather). ..
Why would you say that? I think it's location is solely manufacturing fitting. I tip the GF towards the pump and capture more than leaving it flat (as do many others here). No reason to leave that fine wort behind!

... One problem I have on every batch with the grainfather​ is that I feel like the wort isn't circulating through the grain very well, even with 1/2lb of rice hulls. It ALWAYS puts a ton down the overflow pipe instead of through the grain where it should be going. I keep playing with my grain crush size as well opening it up hoping it will improve the flow as well as my efficiency (currently around 70%).
Slow down your recirc so it doesn't go over the overflow pipe and you'll solve that issue.
Assuming brew house eff, you're fine, I wouldn't get too hung up on it, rather aim for consistency. By tipping when you transfer this figure will increase.
 

nicknicknick

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I want to buy the grainfather but have been waiting for them to release the updated android app that connects reliably to the bluetooth controller.

It looks like they just released the new android app on 5/30. Has anyone used it? If so, should I make the plunge?
 

skraeling

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I want to buy the grainfather but have been waiting for them to release the updated android app that connects reliably to the bluetooth controller.

It looks like they just released the new android app on 5/30. Has anyone used it? If so, should I make the plunge?
even without the app the controller works great in manual mode and is pretty easy to program.
 

bmorosco

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Why would you say that? I think it's location is solely manufacturing fitting. I tip the GF towards the pump and capture more than leaving it flat (as do many others here). No reason to leave that fine wort behind!



Slow down your recirc so it doesn't go over the overflow pipe and you'll solve that issue.
Assuming brew house eff, you're fine, I wouldn't get too hung up on it, rather aim for consistency. By tipping when you transfer this figure will increase.
Agree 100% USE THE RED lever to control the recirculation!
 

BrewinSoldier

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Why would you say that? I think it's location is solely manufacturing fitting. I tip the GF towards the pump and capture more than leaving it flat (as do many others here). No reason to leave that fine wort behind!

Because that's what the manual tells you when calculating out your water for Sparge and mash. It's the way the Grainfather is made by where they located the pump so you purposely leave behind all the Trub and junk at the bottom. So when you want 6 gallons into the fermenter, you should start with 7.4 gallons. Between boiloff and what is supposed to stay at the bottom, I always end up with 6 gallons into the fermenter without having to tip and put all that hop debris into my fermenter.



Slow down your recirc so it doesn't go over the overflow pipe and you'll solve that issue.
Assuming brew house eff, you're fine, I wouldn't get too hung up on it, rather aim for consistency. By tipping when you transfer this figure will increase.
I tried that once and had a bunch of problems with keeping a consistent temp and also got scorching on the element. Hopefully it doesn't ruin the pilsner I made since you can taste every little flaw with those.
 

seabrew8

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Hey folks, i just mashed in at 67c with the grainfather. But i used a thermometer to check the temp of the mash and it read 57c.

Have anyone else noticed such a difference?
 

elreplica

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Hey folks, i just mashed in at 67c with the grainfather. But i used a thermometer to check the temp of the mash and it read 57c.

Have anyone else noticed such a difference?

Are you using the Connect controller because if you are, it's a lard thundering jayzus b'y, I'm pissed! And on a serious note my east coast brother - I will check...
 

skraeling

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pocketmon

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frankly given the exbeeriments im not really concerned with it much anymore. Ill shoot for a number and just let it ride. im not caring about trying to build a better mousetrap anymore for a problem that frankly may not make a difference at all (especially on our level and batch sizes).
If you really believe that mashing temperature really doesn't matter. Why would you 'control' the temperature? Why don't you just mash at hot water at whatever temperature?

I've tried to measure the temperature in malt basket for a few brews, but now I don't.
Here is my temporal conclusion:
1. 69c in one system is different to 69c in another system. Even in one system, the temperatures measured at different points might differ.

2.The key is "repeatable". We want to have exact the same result by using exact parameters. The is the real purpose of temperature control.

my 0.02
 

skraeling

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If you really believe that mashing temperature really doesn't matter. Why would you 'control' the temperature? Why don't you just mash at hot water at whatever temperature?

I've tried to measure the temperature in malt basket for a few brews, but now I don't.
Here is my temporal conclusion:
1. 69c in one system is different to 69c in another system. Even in one system, the temperatures measured at different points might differ.

2.The key is "repeatable". We want to have exact the same result by using exact parameters. The is the real purpose of temperature control.

my 0.02
which is what im going for repeatability. since im now brewing indoors in a more controlled envrioment thats what im going for.

i control it now... simply because I can.
 

flyerwire

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Hey all, great thread! I took a 4 year hiatus from brewing when i moved to California for a job (couldn't afford a place to live with enough room to brew!). I moved back east and just got my grainfather delivered today! This thread has been invaluable in getting a good base set of knowledge that i'll surely cock up the first time or two.
 

RedlegEd

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Hey all, great thread! I took a 4 year hiatus from brewing when i moved to California for a job (couldn't afford a place to live with enough room to brew!). I moved back east and just got my grainfather delivered today! This thread has been invaluable in getting a good base set of knowledge that i'll surely cock up the first time or two.
Welcome back! I'm sure you'll love it (after you figure out a few tips and tricks to make your brew day go a little easier.) Ed
:mug:
 

canehdianman

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Happy Father's Day and congratulations on your gift. I recommend you spend the time and go through the thread. There's lots of really good info here, much of which has really improved how I use and enjoy my GF. Ed
:mug:
Thanks. I've been reading this thread for over a year. Just unsubscribed a few months ago as I had decided that I didn't NEED a GF (I brew with my brothers on a 10G system right now).

But now I've got one! And brewing in winter will be a bazillion times better now.
 

domdom

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still like my grainfather after about a year of brewing with it. biggest issues are:
-slow sparging, even with rice hulls. usually have to stir the mash a little during the second half of sparging.
-filter getting clogged on heavily hopped beers. got a hop spider but worried it will effect hop utilization. just need to pull the trigger at some point.
 

BrewBrains

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I was just thinking along similar lines, as I had noticed I didn't seem to get a fuller body on my last hefeweizen than the previous batch by doing the sach rest at 154 as opposed to 149. I think the problem might be doing step mashes via the temperature mash in the GF as opposed to the infusion method? BrewinSoldier, did you do a lower temp rest 1st, like a protein or ferrulic acid rest that I did for my beer? Does anyone else find this is an issue because you're taking the mash thru the beta amylase range on the ramp up to the alpha range? I'm thinking you need to dump the grains in when the mash water is already at the sacharification rest temp in order to hit the body you want for that beer. Is anyone actually adding hotter water to do a step mash?
Hey I am bumping this question I had about step mashing via a temperature mash method with the GF as opposed to infusion mashing with other equipment as I would appreciate further input from my GF partners-in-crime regarding step mashes. Planning a 1040 ish Czech Pale Lager with 60% undermodified Weyermann Pilsner(floor malted). I would do a decoction but am concerned about the temperatures of the main mash going slowly through 140s as it is heating up. Don't want the body to come out roo thin from sitting at that temperature. Did a small decoction on a previous beer but didn't plan to remove enough mash to raise temps fully to the next step by returning a huge pot of boiling mash to the main mash. Any ideas to clarify step mash method with the GF greatly appreciated!
 
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BrewBrains

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I was just thinking along similar lines, as I had noticed I didn't seem to get a fuller body on my last hefeweizen than the previous batch by doing the sach rest at 154 as opposed to 149. I think the problem might be doing step mashes via the temperature mash in the GF as opposed to the infusion method? BrewinSoldier, did you do a lower temp rest 1st, like a protein or ferrulic acid rest that I did for my beer? Does anyone else find this is an issue because you're taking the mash thru the beta amylase range on the ramp up to the alpha range? I'm thinking you need to dump the grains in when the mash water is already at the sacharification rest temp in order to hit the body you want for that beer. Is anyone actually adding hotter water to do a step mash?
Hey I am bumping this question I had about step mashing via a temperature mash method with the GF as opposed to infusion mashing with other equipment as I would appreciate further input from my GF partners-in-crime regarding step mashes. Planning a 1040 ish Czech Pale Lager with 60% undermodified Weyermann Pilsner(floor malted). I would do a decoction but am concerned about the temperatures of the main mash going slowly through 140s as it is heating up. Don't want the body to come out roo thin from sitting at that temperature. Did a small decoction on a previous beer but didn't plan to remove enough mash to raise temps fully to the next step by returning a huge pot of boiling mash to the main mash. Any ideas to clarify step mash method with the GF greatly appreciated!
 

RedlegEd

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still like my grainfather after about a year of brewing with it. biggest issues are:
-slow sparging, even with rice hulls. usually have to stir the mash a little during the second half of sparging.
-filter getting clogged on heavily hopped beers. got a hop spider but worried it will effect hop utilization. just need to pull the trigger at some point.
Hi. I'm thinking with a slow sparge, especially using rice hulls, that your crush might be too fine (I personally use 0.045", but wouldn't go any smaller than 0.040", and the GF website recommends 0.050" - 0.055".) Also, have you tried conditioning your malt before milling? It's very easy to do and makes a huge difference. I get my best results when I weigh out and condition my grain the day before brew day, but some folks will just do it an hour before. Here is an excellent writeup on how to do it. The only thing I do different is weigh my water before hand so I don't have to keep track of how much I use. As for the hop basket/spider, I'd say give it a shot. I don't think you'll lose that much utilization where it becomes significant to the flavor. You can always dry hop to make up for any difference. Hope this helps. Ed
:mug:
 

treacheroustexan

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I'm going to agree with the crush causing the slow sparge. I struggle during the sparge when I have my LHBS crush my grain. I brewed a kit from morebeer a few weeks ago and it was the fastest sparge I've ever had.
 

domdom

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Hi. I'm thinking with a slow sparge, especially using rice hulls, that your crush might be too fine (I personally use 0.045", but wouldn't go any smaller than 0.040", and the GF website recommends 0.050" - 0.055".) Also, have you tried conditioning your malt before milling? It's very easy to do and makes a huge difference.
probably right on the crush. i started doing only a single crush and was getting poor utilization (around 65%) so i began double crushing. i'm thinking about maybe trying only double crushing half the bill to see if that gives me a happy medium. i really don't mind doing a gentle stir if i have to if it does get stuck.
 

dibbz

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I have my mill @ 0.037" and have never had a stuck sparge in dozens of brews, even with a good amount of flaked wheat/oats. Slow sparges occasionally but they aren't a real issue. I do get a lot of malt bits through the screen but i scoop them out when coming up to boil. Don't let the water level get far blow the screen of the air will cause it to get stuck, also you can bang the side of the malt pipe to assist if that happens.

I bought a hop spider and only used it once as it impacted the hop utilisation, even with 200g of pellets if you whirlpool properly it doesn't block. My tip here is to go anti-clockwise so you don't spin off the rubber cap on the filter. Don't use the pump until after whirlpooling or it will be blocked.

My issues: the temp protection triggering, it triggered 3 times in 5 minutes when I was coming back up to boil after pasteurizing the chiller yesterday, it tripped seconds after i scraped down the element. This alone is making me consider a brau next time around. Perhaps a second hand brau and a brewmanicex8266.
Bluetooth controller hung on me during delayed heating, not sure what would have happened if I didn't find it when it was heating, probably boil.
Bluetooth controller hop timings for multiple hop stand additions after boil, it doesn't do anything for you after the boil.
 
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