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Goose Island House Ale Yeast Strain

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ISUBrew79

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Does anyone happen to know what Goose Island's house ale yeast strain is? I'm referring to the one used for their standard, non-Belgian beers (312, Honker's Ale, IPA, etc.) I was at their Clybourn pub back in August and really enjoyed their Green Line Pale Ale, which is only available on draft in Chicago. I recently brewed a clone attempt of this beer, and used Safale US-05 yeast, mainly because I had it on hand at the time.

I suspect that Goose Island is using a proprietary "house" strain that they've been culturing at the brewery for years, but I'm not sure what commercial strain I might compare it to. Other homebrewers I've discussed this with seem to think that Goose Island uses a Chico-type yeast strain (1056/001/US-05).

Anyone have any thoughts?
 

apratsunrthd

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As clean as their beers are, I'd tend to agree with other homebrewers on this one. There's nothing unique or special about the yeast character in their beers that I can detect --that's not to say they don't make great beers --I just don't think you have a lot to gain by trying to bottle culture from them. Now Bell's, that's a different story.
 
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ISUBrew79

ISUBrew79

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I'm not planning to bottle culture Goose Island's yeast. I think all of their mainstream beers are filtered, with the exception of 312, so it would be difficult to get their yeast. I'm more concerned with getting a reasonable approximation of GI's yeast from Wyeast or White Labs.
 

beergolf

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In beer Captured the yeast for the Honkers clone is listed as 1968.

I moved away from Chicago 12 yrs ago so It has been a long time since I had one to compare.
 

JPFuller

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Does anyone happen to know what Goose Island's house ale yeast strain is? I'm referring to the one used for their standard, non-Belgian beers (312, Honker's Ale, IPA, etc.) I was at their Clybourn pub back in August and really enjoyed their Green Line Pale Ale, which is only available on draft in Chicago. I recently brewed a clone attempt of this beer, and used Safale US-05 yeast, mainly because I had it on hand at the time.

I suspect that Goose Island is using a proprietary "house" strain that they've been culturing at the brewery for years, but I'm not sure what commercial strain I might compare it to. Other homebrewers I've discussed this with seem to think that Goose Island uses a Chico-type yeast strain (1056/001/US-05).

Anyone have any thoughts?
As both of my sons really like Green Line, I have been working hard to clone it and think I've just about got it right. FWIW, Wyeast 1272, held at no more than 66 degrees during primary seems exactly right, in my experience. Haven't tried reproducing any of the other Goose Island offerings so I cant offer an opinion.
 
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ISUBrew79

ISUBrew79

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As both of my sons really like Green Line, I have been working hard to clone it and think I've just about got it right. FWIW, Wyeast 1272, held at no more than 66 degrees during primary seems exactly right, in my experience. Haven't tried reproducing any of the other Goose Island offerings so I cant offer an opinion.
I'm enjoying a pint of my first attempt at Green Line right now. My grain bill consisted of 2-row, Maris Otter, and Munich malts. I used Columbus for 60 minute bittering, Mt. Hood at 15 minutes, and Amarillo and Simcoe at flameout. I dry hopped with Simcoe and Citra. I used Safale US-05 yeast. As I anticipated, the color of my clone is a bit lighter than I remember Green Line being, since I used 84% domestic 2-row. Next time I'll use domestic pale ale malt (Rahr makes a good one, as does Great Western). I found that my clone is slightly drier than Green Line. I think your choice of Wyeast 1272 is good because it leaves a little more residual sweetness than 1056/001/US05, while still having a relatively clean ester profile when fermented cool. Next time I brew this, I'll probably use either the 1272 or White Labs 007.
 

DrewBrewTheGreat

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man all I can remember is there bourbon aged stout--so good. And "Matilda"--> a Belgium Orval like beer--so good.

At least three or four years ago--->the 50 barrel production facility (running 24/7 and pushing 60 barrels) uses more than one yeast. They have a nice in-house lab and full time lab techs maintaining yeast. They even culture Bret. Ballsy if you ask me. But they have strong quality control and procedures. Siebel works with them. They also have some nice really filtering equipment (DE) so they can use any yeast they want really (without concern about flocculation).

Their hops were often 4 or 5 years old, but cold stored well. Likely after the hop shortage--they burned through their reserves though. Standard American two row, augured in from silllows. Specialty malts they seemed to spend the extra dollar on. Pretty cool automation at the production facility--but I wouldn't want to brew there. Too automated. The only thing brewers touch (other than a McDonald's type touch screen) is the pelletized hops and some bags of specialty malts or ingredients. More like factory work, really.

The honkers, ipa, and 312 were nothing to write home about. The IPA the best of the bunch when fresh. They whirlpool that after flameout with a significant amount of hops. DOn't remember what--but for sure classic american IPA varieties. Any clean fermenting ale yeast will work for those beers. They call there IPA English--but I don't remember it really being all that so. Personally, I like the chico for pales and IPA's and the german ale yeast for american wheats.

The green room beer must be newer... Probably pretty good--they needed an a more american style pale--the Honkers never did it for me.

Their Lincoln Park smaller set up, on the other hand, is the cat's meow. They keep the production beers on tap, but the brewer there--pretty much has free reign to do whatever he wants. And he does--or did anyway. Some really nice beers, in a really great setup brew pub. Good food and beer.
 

Montanaandy

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man all I can remember is there bourbon aged stout--so good. And "Matilda"--> a Belgium Orval like beer--so good.

At least three or four years ago--->the 50 barrel production facility (running 24/7 and pushing 60 barrels) uses more than one yeast. They have a nice in-house lab and full time lab techs maintaining yeast. They even culture Bret. Ballsy if you ask me. But they have strong quality control and procedures. Siebel works with them. They also have some nice really filtering equipment (DE) so they can use any yeast they want really (without concern about flocculation).

Their hops were often 4 or 5 years old, but cold stored well. Likely after the hop shortage--they burned through their reserves though. Standard American two row, augured in from silllows. Specialty malts they seemed to spend the extra dollar on. Pretty cool automation at the production facility--but I wouldn't want to brew there. Too automated. The only thing brewers touch (other than a McDonald's type touch screen) is the pelletized hops and some bags of specialty malts or ingredients. More like factory work, really.

The honkers, ipa, and 312 were nothing to write home about. The IPA the best of the bunch when fresh. They whirlpool that after flameout with a significant amount of hops. DOn't remember what--but for sure classic american IPA varieties. Any clean fermenting ale yeast will work for those beers. They call there IPA English--but I don't remember it really being all that so. Personally, I like the chico for pales and IPA's and the german ale yeast for american wheats.

The green room beer must be newer... Probably pretty good--they needed an a more american style pale--the Honkers never did it for me.

Their Lincoln Park smaller set up, on the other hand, is the cat's meow. They keep the production beers on tap, but the brewer there--pretty much has free reign to do whatever he wants. And he does--or did anyway. Some really nice beers, in a really great setup brew pub. Good food and beer.
Great info. Thanks so much for sharing.
 

wittmania

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As both of my sons really like Green Line, I have been working hard to clone it and think I've just about got it right. FWIW, Wyeast 1272, held at no more than 66 degrees during primary seems exactly right, in my experience. Haven't tried reproducing any of the other Goose Island offerings so I cant offer an opinion.
JP, I need this recipe. NOW!!! :rockin:

I had Green Line for the first time when we were in Chicago this summer. I would love to try to brew it.
 

indianaroller

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A brewer from goose island told me they use a high attenuating English ale yeast. They have white labs posters in their brewery so I suspect they use wlp007. Goose island lists 312 as an English summer ale. 312 is 90% domestic 2row and 10% torrified wheat. They use cascades for flavor and aroma.
 
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