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Couple of questions.. Wort Transfer & Saving Yeast

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frankdontsurf

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When I transfer my cooled wort into my fermentation bucket do I use a siphon or can I just pour it in so it aerates? Do I pitch my yeast on top or let it mix in?

I'll be making the Centennial Blonde, a Bavarian Hefe, and an Amber ale.. All use different yeasts, and I'll be brewing one of them every few weeks as I get started in the hobby. What is the easiest way to reuse my yeast? Just swirl the trub and pour it in a few mason jars and refrigerate?
 

Chanoc

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Depending on your setup...
Siphoning is easier as you don't have to move big heavy vessels...
As you describe is easiest...
Just make sure to sanitize said jars...
And associated equipment
 

petrolSpice

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I siphon just because it's easier than lifting/pouring 8 gallons from the kettle. Once it's down to a gallon or two left I'll pour it.
 
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frankdontsurf

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Depending on your setup...
Siphoning is easier as you don't have to move big heavy vessels...
As you describe is easiest...
Just make sure to sanitize said jars...
And associated equipment
I siphon just because it's easier than lifting/pouring 8 gallons from the kettle. Once it's down to a gallon or two left I'll pour it.

Thanks to both.. I'll be doing 2-3 gallon batches.
 

TexasWine

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I find it easier to overbuild my starter initially as opposed to trying to save yeast from the bottom of a fermenter. You don't have worry about hop debris, proteins from the break, or any other fermentation product getting into your yeast that way. I overbuild by 1 quart.
 
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frankdontsurf

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I find it easier to overbuild my starter initially as opposed to trying to save yeast from the bottom of a fermenter. You don't have worry about hop debris, proteins from the break, or any other fermentation product getting into your yeast that way. I overbuild by 1 quart.
Did some reading..

You're saying taking a pack of yeast, make a quart of starter with DME, use a cup or two to pitch, continue feeding (and adding back water) original starter? Or does the shelf life expire?
 

atcsat

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Did some reading..

You're saying taking a pack of yeast, make a quart of starter with DME, use a cup or two to pitch, continue feeding (and adding back water) original starter? Or does the shelf life expire?
I do as TexasWine does, and also wash yeast from previous batches (for experimental purposes). Either way is about the same amount of work, but splitting the original starter is obviously cleaner yeast. 2 months is my personal cutoff for stored yeast (at about 33F), then I either feed it or toss it. I've gone 3 months with no problem, though.

From a new vial of yeast, I do a 1500ml starter with 100g (about 1 cup) light DME for 36 hours on stir plate so the original is basically doubled. Cold crash, decant, then split that equally; save one for later and make another starter with the other half for the current brew. Repeating this process with the saved clean yeast instead of new vial for each brew keeps my yeast happy.

Good luck and have fun!
 
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frankdontsurf

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I do as TexasWine does, and also wash yeast from previous batches (for experimental purposes). Either way is about the same amount of work, but splitting the original starter is obviously cleaner yeast. 2 months is my personal cutoff for stored yeast (at about 33F), then I either feed it or toss it. I've gone 3 months with no problem, though.

From a new vial of yeast, I do a 1500ml starter with 100g (about 1 cup) light DME for 36 hours on stir plate so the original is basically doubled. Cold crash, decant, then split that equally; save one for later and make another starter with the other half for the current brew. Repeating this process with the saved clean yeast instead of new vial for each brew keeps my yeast happy.

Good luck and have fun!
Excellent, thank you!
 
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