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Carlito2017

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I am day 9 of a Coopers (Brew A) IPA. I feel that SG has stabilized. Temp has been at 75F/24C It smells and tastes OK. But the batch looks very cloudy. Any suggestions? Should I rack to secondary fermenter or wait or go ahead and bottle.
 

Jag75

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Most people here dont transfer to a secondary. There are times to do it and times not to. If you do its important to make sure you do it without oxidizing your beer .

As for botteling now , that depends on your readings with a hydrometer. 9 days seems awful premature to me. I usually leave mine for 3 weeks roughly give or take .
 
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Jag and Island- you cracked me up!
Carlito- agreed of course. What your beer needs now is a bit more time. If you have a stable SG (you have taken an SG, right?) then it will help to move the fermenter someplace cooler. Cold temps help sediment yeast and other things, helping clear up the beer. Patience IS a virtue when it comes to beer!
 

Jag75

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Patience is up there at the top when it comes to brewing for sure . Excellent point.
 

IslandLizard

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Before bottling we usually take 2 gravity readings (e.g., hydrometer) 3 days apart. If they match and are close to the expected Final Gravity (FG), it's usually safe to bottle. That to prevent potential bottle bombs.

Since you fermented quite warm, it's most likely done, but it may benefit from some extra time conditioning due to those higher ferm temps.

Leaving the beer for another week without touching it is usually better anyway, as 'conditioning' is the third and last phase, an essential part, of the fermentation process. During that process the yeast will also floc out more, leaving clearer beer on top. Only cold crashing/storing, with or without some gelatin, will speed up that flocculation process.

As @Jag75 said, secondaries are usually not needed, they won't clear your beer any faster, or make it any better. Chances are it will make it worse due to potential oxidation and infection during transfer. Racking without introducing air (oxygen) to the beer is actually quite difficult. Leave it be is best, unless you want to bulk age for 3 months or longer.

On a side note, since this is an IPA, did you dry hop it? Does the recipe call for dry hopping at some point? If not, this is the time to do it.
 

brewhaus88

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If you have the means to transfer to a secondary its best to do so. This will separate the beer from the dead yeast cake and prevent any off flavors. If not, just leave it in a slightly colder area of the house for a 4-5 more days to let the rest of the yeast drop out of suspension. Given its an IPA the style is generally cloudy anyways so you should be good to go.
 

IslandLizard

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If you have the means to transfer to a secondary its best to do so. This will separate the beer from the dead yeast cake and prevent any off flavors. If not, just leave it in a slightly colder area of the house for a 4-5 more days to let the rest of the yeast drop out of suspension. Given its an IPA the style is generally cloudy anyways so you should be good to go.
What dead yeast? That yeast is very much alive, it did a marvelous job and is going into dormancy now. Use of secondaries has been mostly debunked, they're likely to cause more trouble (especially in novice hands) while there's nothing to fix nothing. I have left beer on the original yeast cakes for 2 months without it giving off any liver or Marmite flavors. I sometimes reuse those cakes for a subsequent high gravity batch.

IPAs are not generally cloudy. Exceptions are intentionally Hazy IPAs and NEIPAs.
The only reason not to condition for 3 weeks and bottle it somewhat cloudy is the obvious tradeoff between optimal flavor/aroma and clarity. Even the 3 weeks it takes to prime the bottles pushes many homebrew IPAs past that optimal consumption window, so kegging and force carbonating may be a better alternative so they can be enjoyed earlier while still 'in their prime.'
 

brewhaus88

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What dead yeast? That yeast is very much alive, it did a marvelous job and is going into dormancy now. Use of secondaries has been mostly debunked, they're likely to cause more trouble (especially in novice hands) while there's nothing to fix nothing. I have left beer on the original yeast cakes for 2 months without it giving off any liver or Marmite flavors. I sometimes reuse those cakes for a subsequent high gravity batch.

IPAs are not generally cloudy. Exceptions are intentionally Hazy IPAs and NEIPAs.
The only reason not to condition for 3 weeks and bottle it somewhat cloudy is the obvious tradeoff between optimal flavor/aroma and clarity. Even the 3 weeks it takes to prime the bottles pushes many homebrew IPAs past that optimal consumption window, so kegging and force carbonating may be a better alternative so they can be enjoyed earlier while still 'in their prime.'
I almost always trasfer to a secondary just as a personal preferance. I find it much clearer in the end and I know that I won’t extract off flavors. Not to say your suggestion is wrong, just that’s what I prefer to do. It all makes drinkable beer in the end.
 
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RM-MN

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I am day 9 of a Coopers (Brew A) IPA. I feel that SG has stabilized. Temp has been at 75F/24C It smells and tastes OK. But the batch looks very cloudy. Any suggestions? Should I rack to secondary fermenter or wait or go ahead and bottle.
If you have verified that the beer is at FG, go ahead and bottle it now. Mine clear up in the bottle by the time they have carbonated and conditioned for a few day. I've sampled a couple at a week in the bottle and find that is enough time for an IPA. YMMV
 

Calder

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You could try adding gelatin. I find it clears my beers up quite a bit. Half a teaspoon of gelatin dissolved in a few ozs of water and then added straight to the beer (no stirring).

Gelatin is the same as you buy in the grocery store for deserts (unflavored)

There are lots of ways people prepare gelatin, I read recently that you can boil it, but I've not taken that step. The way I prepare gelatin is:
- Add half teaspoon to 1 ozs of water (I use a shot glass). And leave it to bloom for about 20 minutes.
- Boil ~5 ozs water in microwave (boil off the entrained O2).
- Let water cool to between 150 to 170 F.
- Add the gelatin, stir, and then pour into fermenter while still hot.

The hot liquid will spread out across the surface of the beer, and the gelatin will drop and remove haze particles over the next 2 to 3 days.
 
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