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mygar

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I am currently brewing 1 gallon batches for learning. Will do 2.5 gal soon. Ideally, I think 2.5 gal batches will be best for me regarding consumption and brewing frequency.

I have been looking at ss brewtech mini kettle @ 5.5 gal. I think this would be tight for the odd higher gravity beers that I may brew. Anvil has a 7.5 kettle. Which would you choose for 2.5g biab? Thx!
 

Coastalbrew

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I've been doing 3.25 G batches in the Brewer's edge mash and boil for a while now and love it. If go with an all in one if it was me.
 
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mygar

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Yes I have been looking at all in ones as well. I'm kind of thinking ahead... about options. I know I have not brewed enough yet to even know what I what... only what I think I need lol. So will get more experience before I actually purchase. So just research at this point
 

Sammy86

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From a guy who has an all in one electric system you have to go for it. For your small batch sizes the small 120V will get the job done!

I went from the kitchen and cooler mash tun and I'm beyond grateful for the ease in which my all in one system has made brewing!
 
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mygar

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Sammy which one do you have?
 

Sammy86

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Which one do you have?
Robobrew Brewzilla 65L (17 gallon). I went bigger because I know now having three kids my opportunities to brew are smaller so I upgraded and went bigger. For my purposes brewing 10 gallons batches I've been splitting then batches and using two different yeasts so I have two different beers from one wort.
 
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mygar

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Robobrew Brewzilla 65L (17 gallon). I went bigger because I know now having three kids my opportunities to brew are smaller so I upgraded and went bigger. For my purposes brewing 10 gallons batches I've been splitting then batches and using two different yeasts so I have two different beers from one wort.
That makes sense. I know there are more options for bigger batches too... like spike solo, clawhammer ... but getting down the rabbit hole pretty quickly for a newbie haha
 

Sammy86

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That makes sense. I know there are more options for bigger batches too... like spike solo, clawhammer ... but getting down the rabbit hole pretty quickly for a newbie haha
Indeed! I've been planning my assent since my first batch back in college...I originally planned to get a 3 vessel all electric system but the prices are outrageous and I hate to admit but I'm getting lazier...not so much in the process or design but the all in one makes life easier...especially clean up which is my least favorite part!
 

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I have been looking at ss brewtech mini kettle @ 5.5 gal. I think this would be tight for the odd higher gravity beers that I may brew. Anvil has a 7.5 kettle. Which would you choose for 2.5g biab?
I do 2 1/2 gallon batches in a 5 gallon pot and find that it gets pretty close to the lid if I mash with too much grain. The 7.5 gallon kettle gives you more room for the mash and more room for the boil so you don't boil over when you get a big amount of foam. While the Anvil kettle will be great, a much cheaper turkey fryer will get the job done too. Sometimes those show up on Craigslist for next to nothing if you are willing to look for them. They will even come with the burner.
 

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I also do mostly BIAB 2.5 gallon batches. If you do beers that are around 1.060 OG or less, a 5.5 gallon kettle will work. I ended up switching to the Anvil Foundry, 6.5 gallon version. As an all-in-one, it's a rather inexpensive entry-level model. Worth taking a look at, IMO.
 

Oginme

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I also do the majority of my brews at 10 L (2.6 gal). I was doing BIAB with a 5.5 gall kettle and have switched to the 6.5 gal Anvil. I've been brewing on it for over a year now and it fits my brewing style very well. I still do a full volume BIAB and have had plenty of room to make relatively high gravity brews.
 
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mygar

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I also do mostly BIAB 2.5 gallon batches. If you do beers that are around 1.060 OG or less, a 5.5 gallon kettle will work. I ended up switching to the Anvil Foundry, 6.5 gallon version. As an all-in-one, it's a rather inexpensive entry-level model. Worth taking a look at, IMO.
Yes, it is definitely on my radar. I have read reviews and watched vids on it etc. Mostly positive... how is yours working for you? Likes/dislikes?
 
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mygar

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I also do the majority of my brews at 10 L (2.6 gal). I was doing BIAB with a 5.5 gall kettle and have switched to the 6.5 gal Anvil. I've been brewing on it for over a year now and it fits my brewing style very well. I still do a full volume BIAB and have had plenty of room to make relatively high gravity brews.
Yep was thinking that extra 1 gal space would give some breathing room. Do you use wort chiller or ice bath with kettle?
 

HarlemBrewDoug

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Yes, it is definitely on my radar. I have read reviews and watched vids on it etc. Mostly positive... how is yours working for you? Likes/dislikes?
I like mine quite a bit, just used it this past Sunday. It definitely takes some getting used to if you're used to certain efficiencies, and there are a lot of options on techniques. Personally, I use a BIAB still in the malt pipe, and recirculate with a pump during mashing. The biggest issue I have is that the handle for the malt pipe sticks through, and my bag gets caught on it when doing larger brews.

The biggest like I have is in time savings. I ended up getting a 240v outlet installed in my tiny 1 bedroom apartment. Now my brew day takes a couple of hours rather than the 4-5 when I was using my stove top.
 
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mygar

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The biggest like I have is in time savings. I ended up getting a 240v outlet installed in my tiny 1 bedroom apartment. Now my brew day takes a couple of hours rather than the 4-5 when I was using my stove top.
Yea I think I would prefer 240v. I have seen a video somewhere... of making an extension cord and adapter to plug into dryer plug etc. Not sure about that though. One criticism someone brought up was the use of 20w plug on the cord not paired with 30amp breaker. I'm no electrician by any means... but I can't see this being a problem. If the unit is designed to run on 20amp... it will only pull 20 amp from the power source... right?
 

HarlemBrewDoug

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One criticism someone brought up was the use of 20w plug on the cord not paired with 30amp breaker. I'm no electrician by any means... but I can't see this being a problem. If the unit is designed to run on 20amp... it will only pull 20 amp from the power source... right?
You’re absolutely correct. You want to be pulling less than the max amp of the breaker. I have a 240v cable that I spliced a GFCI into. As long as you have something like that, you should be fine.
1597248534160.jpeg
 

Immocles

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Also a fan of the all in ones. I use a mash & boil. Good stuff.

To your original question, I brewed in that 2.5-2.75G biab range on my stovetop for about ten brews or so. After that was when the M&B came into the picture and now only stovetop brew my 1G batches. I had a wilser bag made to fit my 5G kettle from the basic starter brew kits. For most of those brews I dunk sparged the bag after the mash into about .5-.75G of water in a smaller kettle. Then combined for the boil. I usually shot for about 4G in the kettle to get about 2.75G into the fermenter. Definitely needed to watch the kettle like a hawk, but it fit and no boilovers. Gas stove though, so getting to a boil was not a problem.

But if I had the option, I'd take the bigger kettle. Also gives you the opportunity to make a slightly bigger batch of something you know you enjoy, or that you plan to share with folks. But I do love the all in one set ups. I can brew in the basement, or the garage, or the deck.
 
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mygar

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You’re absolutely correct. You want to be pulling less than the max amp of the breaker. I have a 240v cable that I spliced a GFCI into. As long as you have something like that, you should be fine.
View attachment 693566
Yep perfect solution imo. Portable ... if you move or want to brew somewhere else. Just do not want to exceed certain length of extension cord due to resistance, making sure your unit is getting all 20amps that it needs to draw...
 
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mygar

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Also a fan of the all in ones. I use a mash & boil. Good stuff.

To your original question, I brewed in that 2.5-2.75G biab range on my stovetop for about ten brews or so. After that was when the M&B came into the picture and now only stovetop brew my 1G batches. I had a wilser bag made to fit my 5G kettle from the basic starter brew kits. For most of those brews I dunk sparged the bag after the mash into about .5-.75G of water in a smaller kettle. Then combined for the boil. I usually shot for about 4G in the kettle to get about 2.75G into the fermenter. Definitely needed to watch the kettle like a hawk, but it fit and no boilovers. Gas stove though, so getting to a boil was not a problem.

But if I had the option, I'd take the bigger kettle. Also gives you the opportunity to make a slightly bigger batch of something you know you enjoy, or that you plan to share with folks. But I do love the all in one set ups. I can brew in the basement, or the garage, or the deck.
Sounds like we are on same path on our journey lol. More to think about... the anvil 6.5 is definitely something to consider though at its price point. Gets me out of kitchen... kids already giving me eye rolls for taking over it most of morning haha
 

jdauria

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I would recommend the 6.5 gallon Anvil Foundry. It's perfect for 2.5-3.0 gallon batches and where they are a subsidy of Blichmann, have great customer service.
 
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mygar

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I would recommend the 6.5 gallon Anvil Foundry. It's perfect for 2.5-3.0 gallon batches and where they are a subsidy of Blichmann, have great customer service.
I just watched another instruction video from Great Fermentatations" ... pretty slick and sees easy to use
 
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mygar

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I use a BIAB still in the malt pipe, and recirculate with a pump during mashing. The biggest issue I have is that the handle for the malt pipe sticks through, and my bag gets caught on it when doing larger brews.
So I take it the basket is bit coarse and allows more particles in wort? I dont see needing to use a biab in malt pipe being too big of a deal if it helps though. I bet all these "all in ones" similar
 

Immocles

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I also use a bag in the mash pipe, mostly because I crush pretty finely using a corona mill. With a normal AG crush from a 3 roller mill, you probably would be able to mash in the pipe as directed. Bag is one more thing to clean, I guess, but otherwise I find it just as convenient.
 

jdauria

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I just watched another instruction video from Great Fermentatations" ... pretty slick and sees easy to use
It is, I have the 10.5 gallon. Like with anything, there are tips and mods to make it even easier, but straight out of the box, it's pretty simple to use.
 

HarlemBrewDoug

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So I take it the basket is bit coarse and allows more particles in wort? I dont see needing to use a biab in malt pipe being too big of a deal if it helps though. I bet all these "all in ones" similar
Pretty much. My LHBS crushes pretty fine, so since I was already had my mesh bag, it wouldn't hurt to keep using it. @Immocles is right that's if you can do your own crush at "normal" settings you don't really need to use it.
 

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Regarding the original question, I think about 3X your target batch size is a safe bet for buying a kettle. Can you use 2X most of the time? Certainly, but if you do want to do a larger batch, or you forget to turn down the heat before tossing in the first boil hops, then that extra capacity will be your best friend.
 

Oginme

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Yep was thinking that extra 1 gal space would give some breathing room. Do you use wort chiller or ice bath with kettle?
I use an immersion chiller. Most of the time it has been the one which came with the Anvil. When i brew inside, I can reach the tap with my old chiller which has more surface area down into the kettle. Realistically, the difference has not been huge, maybe an extra 5 to 10 minutes and is more dictated by my well water temperature than which chiller I use.
 
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mygar

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I use an immersion chiller. Most of the time it has been the one which came with the Anvil. When i brew inside, I can reach the tap with my old chiller which has more surface area down into the kettle. Realistically, the difference has not been huge, maybe an extra 5 to 10 minutes and is more dictated by my well water temperature than which chiller I use.
Yea in the summer my water temp is 76F or so... so I need an ice bath ... or part partial use of ice water for chiller
 

HarlemBrewDoug

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Yea in the summer my water temp is 76F or so... so I need an ice bath ... or part partial use of ice water for chiller
To combat high water temps, I've been chilling as far as possible with the immersion chiller hooked up to the sink, and then putting the carboy into the mini-fridge fermentation chamber to cool down the rest of the way. Once it's at the right temp, I add my yeast. Haven't had a problem yet.
 

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I am currently brewing 1 gallon batches for learning. Will do 2.5 gal soon. Ideally, I think 2.5 gal batches will be best for me regarding consumption and brewing frequency.
...
a little off topic but I’ve been reading a lot about hop flavors lately and one of the tips is to reduce headspace in the serving vessel. 2.5-3 gal kegs would be much better 1/2 way thru a keg than a 5 gal because the aroma is lost in the headspace.

i am thinking about picking up a cpl smaller kegs for my 5 gal batches so I can limit headspace so 2.5 gal batches would serve the same purpose.

cheers to 2.5 gal batches!
 

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