Wine Conditioner problem??

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Sweeps

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Hello all,

Novice winemaker here, I bottled a gallon of strawberry and a gallon of pineapple a few months ago, and when I was going to try one of them today, I noticed that the pineapple wine had white particles floating in it, some almost as big as shredded cheese. Keep in mind the wine was completely clear when I bottled it, AND the pineapple was the only wine I used conditioner on.

Could the conditioner be the cause of the floating lees-looking stuff? Any help would be great
 

jgmillr1

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Hi Sweeps and welcome.

The wine conditioner (sorbate & sugar) would not cause your floating bits in the wine. A couple quick thoughts here...

Did you use any bentonite or other protein fining agents on the wine before you bottled it? Some fruit has significant protein that can coagulate to form particles or even can join together to make a light "ghost" in the bottle. Certain fining agents can remove particular proteins and keep this from happening.

Did you add sufficient suflites (campden tablets) to the wine when before you bottled? If not, it is potentially spoilage bacterial growth. The higher the wine pH, the more sulfites you need to use to keep the wine sanitized. How's the wine taste and smell? Do you have any idea on the pH?
 
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Sweeps

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Hi Sweeps and welcome.

The wine conditioner (sorbate & sugar) would not cause your floating bits in the wine. A couple quick thoughts here...

Did you use any bentonite or other protein fining agents on the wine before you bottled it? Some fruit has significant protein that can coagulate to form particles or even can join together to make a light "ghost" in the bottle. Certain fining agents can remove particular proteins and keep this from happening.

Did you add sufficient suflites (campden tablets) to the wine when before you bottled? If not, it is potentially spoilage bacterial growth. The higher the wine pH, the more sulfites you need to use to keep the wine sanitized. How's the wine taste and smell? Do you have any idea on the pH?
I did not use fining agents, just stabilizer and conditioner. And yes I added campden tablets almost every time I racked (which I learned you probably shouldn't do) So idk. Might open one up and give it a wiff
 

jgmillr1

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I'm guessing it is a protein haze which is harmless. You can set the bottles upright a day or so before you plan to drink them and let it settle to the bottom if possible so you can decant it off the sediment.

You may want to back the campden tablet addition back to half a tablet with each racking but it is good to keep the sulfites up to protect from oxidation.

Next time you'll want to get some bentonite and mix it in while it is fermenting. This will handle the positively charged proteins. It then settles onto the bottom of the fermenter and you rack your wine off it. That takes care of most protein haze problems.

Alternatively, you can use the 2-part fining system sold as "super-kleer". This is a kieselsol silica addition followed the next day by chitosan. This will grab any proteins (positively or negatively charged) and give the benefit of helping clarify your wine more quickly.

If you are bothered the white clumps you can pour the bottles back to bulk, do the super-kleer thing to the wine, and re-bottle.
 

jgmillr1

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I wonder if it's a pectic issue?
That is a definite possibility too. The site below refers to pineapple as being low in pectin but it still may be enough to cause a haze or globs.
https://www.thespruce.com/high-and-low-pectin-fruit-1327800

There is a pectin test that can be run to check by mixing 1oz wine with 3oz methylated spirits. Mix and let sit for up to 12hrs and it will form stringy snotty strands if there is pectin present, otherwise it will remain clear.
https://www.winemakingtalk.com/threads/testing-for-pectin-haze.50236/
https://www.leaf.tv/articles/how-to-clear-a-pectin-haze/

There is also a protein test that involves heating the wine up to 180'F for a couple hrs, let it cool slowly to room temp, and observe whether the wine floculates protein. The idea is similar to what happens to egg whites when heated.
https://www.etslabs.com/library/20
http://www.newworldwinemaker.com/article/wine-proteins-and-stability/
 
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