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Transplanting Rhizomes

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jalamson

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We just moved into a new house - not far from our old place in Upstate NY. I had some great success growing hops at my old place, and want to take the rhizomes with me. I dug up the root balls and now I'm wondering what to do until spring.

Should i just get them in the ground, despite the fact that we could have a frost soon, and hope they make it through the winter?

Vacuum seal the rhizomes and freeze until spring?

or just store them in a fridge?

Any advice is much appreciated.
 

OG-wan Kenobi

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I am ignorant on growing hops but since your starting from a root essentially can you just start them indoors and the transfer them outdoors in the spring? Using a fabric pot so it's easy to get your root mass out.
 
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jalamson

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I am ignorant on growing hops but since your starting from a root essentially can you just start them indoors and the transfer them outdoors in the spring? Using a fabric pot so it's easy to get your root mass out.
Not a bad idea, I'd just have to keep them in check for the next 4 months and not have let them grow wild inside!
 

Northern_Brewer

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You don't want them growing over winter - they're temperate plants that need to sleep, and benefit from a few degrees of frost but probably best not to expose newly transplanted plants to deep frost.
 

B-Hoppy

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About 15 years ago I was forced to dig up a crown to make space for another variety. The plant I dug up was fine and I didn't want to just trash it so I dug a shallow trench to bury it in and covered with some ground up leaves. The next spring when I dug it up to make cuttings from for a homebrew event I was amazed at how many new roots had formed over the winter. Basically, when you transplant at this time, the plant will begin to form new roots until the soil freezes and then just take off next spring. Since this incident I've moved plenty of plants/cuttings in the fall. The other big benefit is that it's usually drier in the fall so there's less of a chance to destroy your soil structure rather than doing this type of work in the spring. Have at it!
 

Zuljin

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Midwest says they can be stored in a damp baggie in the fridge for a few months. I'd put a paper towel in with them and change it regularly to avoid mold.

I've received hop rhizomes four times. Three in damp baggies. Two grew. One had mold and did not. My first ever was mostly dried out in a vacuum bag. It did not grow.
 

Calder

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Store it in the ground, best place for it. If your plan is to divide it into several plants, do that now.
 

Apimyces

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Don't vacuum seal. Would you vacuum seal a hibernating bear to move it across the country?

Even in dormance, they are living organisms, they require oxygen to survive.

I'd plant them outside. Dark and moist in fridge otherwise, but that's just more hassle. Can't say which would give you better success rates, but both are viable methods.
 

Sbe2

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Transfer the roots with buds on them (rhizomes) as soon as you can. The ground won’t freeze up here for a while so get them in as quick as you can.
 
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