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Shaking after pitching yeast

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littlestspoon

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Hey,

I just started a pilsner today. Right after pitching the yeast and putting in the airlock, it got really shaken up (a rough job carrying it to its new home). The yeast isn't floating pretty on the top, it seems like its all clumped up around the surface (at least I think thats what the white chunks are).

Am I screwed? I am totally new, but i think my brewing yoda told me not to agitate it after pitching the yeast.

I have more yeast I can add....or I can leave it. my standards are not incredibly high (as long as its drinkable and alcoholic) but if its not going to work at all, I want to get a new batch going.

Thanks in advance
 

carnevoodoo

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Shaking it when you add the yeast is actually suggested. It will introduce oxygen into the wort and you will be helping the reproduction phase of the yeast.

Once fermentation has started and when it is done, you're best to not introduce oxygen by shaking, but before hand is good.
 
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littlestspoon

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cheers! its funny how stressful the process seems when youre new--i just read posts of a hundred newbies poised to dump their brew, only to be told it would be fine.....
 

carnevoodoo

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cheers! its funny how stressful the process seems when youre new--i just read posts of a hundred newbies poised to dump their brew, only to be told it would be fine.....
You only got through 100? We all go through it. It is a nerve racking process when you start, but it gets easier. I only look at my beer after about two weeks in the fermenter now. I just know it'll be fine.
 

rsmith179

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Ditto. I try to leave my beer alone for at least 1-2 weeks to let it do its thing. I still do check on it every once in a while just to make sure that I haven't had any types of blowoffs due to a very active fermentation. No need to worry about the stuff floating on the top for right now. This will probably fall out in the next few days once you are done with the fermentation. If you're planning on racking to a secondary, all of that stuff will be left behind hopefully when transferring.
 

brewmasterpa

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yeah, dont fret over it. oxidizing your wort is necessary to attain proper yeast cultivation and full attenuation. the floaties are yeast colonies and theyll drop out of suspension. dont worry, let it go for 14 days. itll be fine.
 

bull8042

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There has actually been quite a bit of debate on this issue. No question, you are just fine. But many, I think DeathBrewer being one, advocate swirling the fermenter regularly during PRIMARY active fermentation to rouse the yeast and keep them working.
I have found that it may actually help a bit especially in a high OG beer. Just don't shake the crap out of it and introduce any oxygen. It is too late to do that after fermentation has gotten going well and may cause off flavors like wet cardboard.
 
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