Robobrew/Brewzilla Discussion

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OG-wan Kenobi

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Not if you have a better one, you will cool it quicker if you take that jacket off though whatever chiller you have!!
You ain’t kidding!!! I was like what the hell is going on here until it clicked on my head
 

JoeJoe_13

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I’ve been using my 35L Brewzilla for about 18 months, brewed about 15 batches with it. I love it, it’s easy to set up and use. I even tried to use it for distilling(DON’T DO THAT)!! Clean up can take time but it’s not any worse than cleaning up from any brewing process. Good luck and hope you love it!!
Why what happened when you tried to distill with it
 

krazykraut

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After reading through a lot of threads here I’m still a little bit confused. So let’s start from the beginning: I have the 3.1.1 Brewzilla 220V and made some decent beers in it. My water has some issues but that’s a topic for another thread.

As an American in small town Germany, I have a hankering for the West Coast Style Beers with big hop aroma and aggressive bitterness. With “C” hops about twice the price as in the States I’m really trying to make the most of them and would prefer not to use my hop spider even though it is large.

Now, as soon as I use pellet hops,no matter the amount, my pump clogs reliably. I have the false bottom in, but it seems like it’s not doing anything for keeping the hops out of the pump. And that makes sense, the hop material is much smaller than the holes in the false bottom.
Questions:

I have a stainless sink strainer that I can put over the pump inlet (see David Heaths YouTube channel , he uses one over the mash return) - has anyone had success with that? Or will it horribly clog right away?
With a false bottom, does a whirlpool even make sense? I mean, the wort rotates above a perforated sheet of metal, even if it builds up a cone of break material, trub and hop debris, the pump inlet is underneath, so how does a cone forming on the false bottom help there at all?
Has anyone else had their false bottom lift when doing heavy whirlpooling? Mine basically flips up when stirring to much, even if I don’t touch it. Should I put a strip of silicon hose around the perimeter?

If I remove the false bottom, a manual whirlpool works reasonably well, but then the pump inlet is neatly under the trub cone as it isn’t very much off center. And the pump sucks in the hops and clogs, as above. I can use the tap to empty, for sure.

With a whirlpool arm for the Brewzilla, we’ll, not sure how that is supposed to work at all. Am I whirlpooling over the false bottom?

Sorry for the long post. I hope the collective wisdom will show me the way.

Thanks for your answers!

Fabian (aka Krazykraut)
 

DuncB

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@krazykraut

Look at removing the false bottom and get or make a trubtrapper and helix coil, I use one in my Guten 70 litre and it works well.
Picture after draining into fermenter and the fermenter.
trub trap and coil.jpg


Could experiment with hop spider and later additions different temps in the whirlpool and a longer stand as another option. More dry hopping and then no blocks in the robobrew, with cost of hops you can use your dry hops in the boil of next beer. Freeze them until needed

 

krazykraut

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@krazykraut

Look at removing the false bottom and get or make a trubtrapper and helix coil, I use one in my Guten 70 litre and it works well.
Picture after draining into fermenter and the fermenter.
View attachment 727984


Could experiment with hop spider and later additions different temps in the whirlpool and a longer stand as another option. More dry hopping and then no blocks in the robobrew, with cost of hops you can use your dry hops in the boil of next beer. Freeze them until needed

Thanks, that looks great. How tall is that trub trapper? And where is the pump inlet, is it the hole at 1 o'clock? What is the helix coil good for?
Thanks in advance.
- Fabian (aka Krazykraut)
 

DuncB

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@krazykraut
Trub trapper I made is 7 cm high large mesh 2mm on outside which I folded over 0.5mm mesh on the inside, split some silicone tubing 10mm internal to " clip over " this and sit on the bottom of the Robobrew / guten etc.
THe helix coil was meant to attach to the tap outflow with a 1/2 inch T piece for emptying and acted as a filter. Not practical at all for that as I pump out of the Guten into the fermentasaurus, I'm not lifting the 70 litre Guten unless empty. Still happy to bend down to read the controls mind you.
I wouldn't worry about the helix and just go for a trub trapper. Have a look at the portly gentleman on you tube , several videos with trubtrapper and a new bigger one for his rig.
 

CUSTOM-441

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I have a stainless sink strainer that I can put over the pump inlet (see David Heaths YouTube channel , he uses one over the mash return) - has anyone had success with that? Or will it horribly clog right away?
With a false bottom, does a whirlpool even make sense? I mean, the wort rotates above a perforated sheet of metal, even if it builds up a cone of break material, trub and hop debris, the pump inlet is underneath, so how does a cone forming on the false bottom help there at all?
Hey folks! I've been absent from the forum for a while and am just getting caught up. First born has taken priority around here!

I use both the whirlpool arm and a small strainer over the pump inlet. If you look back in this thread, you'll see pictures I posted of a massive 7oz hop cone after a 10min whirlpool on a DIPA. Between the effective whirlpool and the strainer I had no pump clogs, and minimal hop matter in the fermenter. I think the hop cone is hard packed enough after whirlpool to prevent the big bits from being sucked through the false bottom. This is my go to setup with my RB. I haven't used a hop spider because I'm not sure how it would affect hop utilization, but I know others on here use them without concern. I agree with you though, the false bottom holes are large, and depending on manufacturing the false bottom may leave gaps against the sidewall of the kettle.I I feel the strainer mitigates these issues well enough.
 
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After reading through a lot of threads here I’m still a little bit confused. So let’s start from the beginning: I have the 3.1.1 Brewzilla 220V and made some decent beers in it. My water has some issues but that’s a topic for another thread.

As an American in small town Germany, I have a hankering for the West Coast Style Beers with big hop aroma and aggressive bitterness. With “C” hops about twice the price as in the States I’m really trying to make the most of them and would prefer not to use my hop spider even though it is large.

Now, as soon as I use pellet hops,no matter the amount, my pump clogs reliably. I have the false bottom in, but it seems like it’s not doing anything for keeping the hops out of the pump. And that makes sense, the hop material is much smaller than the holes in the false bottom.
Questions:

I have a stainless sink strainer that I can put over the pump inlet (see David Heaths YouTube channel , he uses one over the mash return) - has anyone had success with that? Or will it horribly clog right away?
With a false bottom, does a whirlpool even make sense? I mean, the wort rotates above a perforated sheet of metal, even if it builds up a cone of break material, trub and hop debris, the pump inlet is underneath, so how does a cone forming on the false bottom help there at all?
Has anyone else had their false bottom lift when doing heavy whirlpooling? Mine basically flips up when stirring to much, even if I don’t touch it. Should I put a strip of silicon hose around the perimeter?

If I remove the false bottom, a manual whirlpool works reasonably well, but then the pump inlet is neatly under the trub cone as it isn’t very much off center. And the pump sucks in the hops and clogs, as above. I can use the tap to empty, for sure.

With a whirlpool arm for the Brewzilla, we’ll, not sure how that is supposed to work at all. Am I whirlpooling over the false bottom?

Sorry for the long post. I hope the collective wisdom will show me the way.

Thanks for your answers!

Fabian (aka Krazykraut)
I have a US 220v version as well.

I haven't had any pump/false bottom issues yet, knock on wood.

Just to clarify, your false bottom should fit pretty snug on the bottom of the brewzilla. If it doesn't you have a defective part. I've heard of quite a few people with loose fitting false bottoms and every single one of these people have issues with their pumps and grain/hops getting into the bottom near the element. The grain/hops aren't going through the holes, they're sneaking through the outer edge and down the sides.

Second thing - not sure if you're doing this or not, but do not run your pump during boil - this can cause issues with your pump. If you're moving to the whirlpool stage this is fine, but do not push a rolling boil through the pump - this will kill it in no time.

I use the whirlpool arm. My process: 1. When the boil is done, I connect my counterflow chiller to quickly get the wort down to 180 (this takes about 45 seconds); 2. Connect the whirlpool arm and angle it tightly against the wall; 3. Pump on full power and whirlpool for the amount of time in your recipe. I've done it like this for quite a few brewdays and I've never had issues with the pump. I will say when I'm done and chilled to 70 and pumping into my fermenter the flow definitely slows a bit because of all the hop matter on the top of the false bottom. When I'm fully transferred to the fermenter i'm left with a very thick layer of cone shaped hop material on the false bottom. When I pull out the false bottom the only thing underneath is a bit of wort - never any hops or grain (again, if you're seeing hops and grain the false bottom is bad).
 

krazykraut

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I have a US 220v version as well.

I haven't had any pump/false bottom issues yet, knock on wood.

Just to clarify, your false bottom should fit pretty snug on the bottom of the brewzilla. If it doesn't you have a defective part. I've heard of quite a few people with loose fitting false bottoms and every single one of these people have issues with their pumps and grain/hops getting into the bottom near the element. The grain/hops aren't going through the holes, they're sneaking through the outer edge and down the sides.

Second thing - not sure if you're doing this or not, but do not run your pump during boil - this can cause issues with your pump. If you're moving to the whirlpool stage this is fine, but do not push a rolling boil through the pump - this will kill it in no time.

I use the whirlpool arm. My process: 1. When the boil is done, I connect my counterflow chiller to quickly get the wort down to 180 (this takes about 45 seconds); 2. Connect the whirlpool arm and angle it tightly against the wall; 3. Pump on full power and whirlpool for the amount of time in your recipe. I've done it like this for quite a few brewdays and I've never had issues with the pump. I will say when I'm done and chilled to 70 and pumping into my fermenter the flow definitely slows a bit because of all the hop matter on the top of the false bottom. When I'm fully transferred to the fermenter i'm left with a very thick layer of cone shaped hop material on the false bottom. When I pull out the false bottom the only thing underneath is a bit of wort - never any hops or grain (again, if you're seeing hops and grain the false bottom is bad).
Steve, thank you for the thoughtful response. My false bottom is way too loose, I can flip it up just by whirlpooling manually with a paddle (without touching it). I will see if I can just put some sliced open silicone hose around the perimeter to close the big gaps.
I don’t run the pump during boil.
I don’t have a counter flow chiller, so whirlpooling will have to be done after chilling, but I can still use the recirculation arm to move the wort around the chiller and during the hopstand, which serves the same purpose.
Thanks, I will report back!
Krazykraut
Sometimes I get rigorous boils, sometimes I don't. Using the 120v version I make sure there are no big draws on the same circuit while I'm brewing. Next upgrade will definitely be the jacket though!

I've also noticed the false bottom doesn't seal completely around the edge of the kettle, resulting in lots of hop matter finding it's way to the pump. I bought a small SS strainer from the dollar store, cut off the handle and placed it over the strainer. This has helped quite a bit with the pump, but doesn't solve the false bottom gap issue. I'm planning to cut a slit down a length of silicone tubing and wrap it along the edge of the false bottom. Hopefully this creates a better seal...
I know, old thread, but: did that help sealing the false bottom?
 
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Steve, thank you for the thoughtful response. My false bottom is way too loose, I can flip it up just by whirlpooling manually with a paddle (without touching it). I will see if I can just put some sliced open silicone hose around the perimeter to close the big gaps.
I don’t run the pump during boil.
I don’t have a counter flow chiller, so whirlpooling will have to be done after chilling, but I can still use the recirculation arm to move the wort around the chiller and during the hopstand, which serves the same purpose.
Thanks, I will report back!
Krazykraut

I know, old thread, but: did that help sealing the false bottom?
Yeah, I would definitely try to add something around the edges to keep it in place. I just can't imagine it's loose enough to do so, mine fits so insanely tight that it only slides down the kettle in a very specific angle and then kinda clicks in at the bottom. TBH, I would reach out to Kegland or MoreBeer or wherever you purchased from and demand a new false bottom.

The clarify further - do you have the whirlpool arm built for the brewzilla (can't tell if you have it, or if you're just inquiring about it)? Because it makes a massive difference over recirc arm. Basically that whirlpool arm extends all the way to the bottom, just above the false bottom, and should be angled tightly against the wall to create a strong whirlpool. With the pump on and valve fully open, you should see the top of your wort moving pretty well - this should mean it's whirlpooling really nicely at the bottom.

TBH - it's pointless to whirlpool after chilling - the main purpose of the whirlpool is to be done in combination with the hopstand around 180 for hop extraction. Whirlpooling after would just be a waste of time in my opinion. Either way, sorry you're having trouble - I hope you get it sorted out.
 

krazykraut

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Yeah, I would definitely try to add something around the edges to keep it in place. I just can't imagine it's loose enough to do so, mine fits so insanely tight that it only slides down the kettle in a very specific angle and then kinda clicks in at the bottom. TBH, I would reach out to Kegland or MoreBeer or wherever you purchased from and demand a new false bottom.

The clarify further - do you have the whirlpool arm built for the brewzilla (can't tell if you have it, or if you're just inquiring about it)? Because it makes a massive difference over recirc arm. Basically that whirlpool arm extends all the way to the bottom, just above the false bottom, and should be angled tightly against the wall to create a strong whirlpool. With the pump on and valve fully open, you should see the top of your wort moving pretty well - this should mean it's whirlpooling really nicely at the bottom.

TBH - it's pointless to whirlpool after chilling - the main purpose of the whirlpool is to be done in combination with the hopstand around 180 for hop extraction. Whirlpooling after would just be a waste of time in my opinion. Either way, sorry you're having trouble - I hope you get it sorted out.
I don't have a whirlpool arm yet. I did a batch last weekend where I used my hop spider. It's stainless steel and fairly large (as deep as the Brewzilla, and barely fits inside the chiller) and for the hop stand I ran the chiller for a few seconds to get the wort to 180, then put my aroma hops into the spider and recirculated for ten minutes into that. The hops get well agitated that way, so I'm certain my utilization is good. Once the hop stand is done, I keep recirculating into the spider with the chiller going. This catches cold break and stray grain. So far, that seems to me a very good alternative to the whirlpool. I will play with that technique.

At the heart of this really is what you said above. If whirlpooling is done for the aroma/flameout/hop stand, then any kind of agitation will do. If it's done to get hops/trub/cold break in a cone, the false bottom doesn't make much sense.

I think there is a lot of cargo culting in home brewing, and as an engineer I'm always looking for the 'why' and not just the 'how'.
That doesn't mean your approach isn't working or wrong - I appreciate you sharing - I still just don't get why whirlpooling on top of a false bottom is better than just using the pump to agitate the wort in a random way.
 

Cloud Surfer

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That doesn't mean your approach isn't working or wrong - I appreciate you sharing - I still just don't get why whirlpooling on top of a false bottom is better than just using the pump to agitate the wort in a random way.
Are you using anything at the end of your boil to drop out the hot break? I use Brewbright with 5 minutes to go. Then I cool to 80C, add whirlpool hops if required and whirlpool. I get a massive amount of hot break drop out. It’s around 4cm thick in the middle and tapers to around 1cm thick at the edge. So a flat cone in essence.

The point is, there’s still a build up of break at the edge which would go through my pump if I didn’t have the false bottom in place. I couldn’t brew without the false bottom given how much hot break I collect.
 
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rjhoff

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A lot of discussion this past week about whirlpool and clogged pumps. When I bought my Robobrew three years ago a silicon u-channel ring came with it for adding to the false bottom. I found it on Williams brewing (this is a standard part, should be able to buy it from your local RB dealer). I’ve never used mine as the false bottom is tight against the boil kettle wall.


For the most part I have no clogged pump issues, except one time and I have no idea why. I use a hop spider (stir the hops periodically) during boil and muslin bags during whirlpool. My goal is to keep all grain and hop material out of the boil to minimize pump problems, so besides the spider, I control mash recirculation to avoid any overflow (in fact I’ve removed the center pipe). Although I use a whirlpool attachment, this is more for helping to cool the wort rather than building up sediment as I end up with almost none.

Hope this helps…
 

CUSTOM-441

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I know, old thread, but: did that help sealing the false bottom?
TBH, I never got around to making the silicone mod for the false bottom so I don't have anything to report!

I had no idea this existed. My v3.1 did not come with this gasket. Now that I know it exists I'll probably try to order one. Thanks!
 

krazykraut

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A lot of discussion this past week about whirlpool and clogged pumps. When I bought my Robobrew three years ago a silicon u-channel ring came with it for adding to the false bottom. I found it on Williams brewing (this is a standard part, should be able to buy it from your local RB dealer). I’ve never used mine as the false bottom is tight against the boil kettle wall.


For the most part I have no clogged pump issues, except one time and I have no idea why. I use a hop spider (stir the hops periodically) during boil and muslin bags during whirlpool. My goal is to keep all grain and hop material out of the boil to minimize pump problems, so besides the spider, I control mash recirculation to avoid any overflow (in fact I’ve removed the center pipe). Although I use a whirlpool attachment, this is more for helping to cool the wort rather than building up sediment as I end up with almost none.

Hope this helps…
I ordered some 1.5mm ID silicone hose, with the idea of slicing it open and using it as a gasket. I will report back how badly it goes.

Krazykraut
 

DuncB

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@OG-wan Kenobi I used that same method on the sparge heater and also for checking the temp at the top of the mash, my probe was in a metal spike and when it was tucked under the lid the mesh cord got condensation which trickled down inside the metal probe and stuffed it up. I had to extract the sensor part dry it all out and reassemble it. Works fine now but I don't put the end where the mesh cord goes in inside anything anymore.
 

OG-wan Kenobi

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@OG-wan Kenobi I used that same method on the sparge heater and also for checking the temp at the top of the mash, my probe was in a metal spike and when it was tucked under the lid the mesh cord got condensation which trickled down inside the metal probe and stuffed it up. I had to extract the sensor part dry it all out and reassemble it. Works fine now but I don't put the end where the mesh cord goes in inside anything anymore.
I just went through the hole in the lid and it worked perfectly for me as matter of a fact I don’t see myself not doing this in the future
 

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I had the condenser on the lid for the sparge heater so hole not available and when mashing the grain level was further away than the beginning bit of the probe.
 

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This may be an ignorant question, but I'm just getting into electric.

Tl;dr: Is there any benefit to pulling the trigger on a pre-order purchase now, or waiting until the fall?

I plan on getting the 220V 65L BrewZilla, and the accessories I want to tack on all just became available. However, I see on the product page it's still in pre-order status and expected to be fulfilled starting in August. I don't plan on installing a 220V in my house until I remodel in the fall, so is there any benefit to ordering now, getting the unit in August sometime, and sitting on it? Or are there planned updates (ex. circutboards, hardware, etc.) that would make it a better idea to order closer to when I can actually use the unit? I would hate to wait until later in the year to order, only to have it back-ordered again, not getting it until late winter.
 

Sammy86

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This may be an ignorant question, but I'm just getting into electric.

Tl;dr: Is there any benefit to pulling the trigger on a pre-order purchase now, or waiting until the fall?

I plan on getting the 220V 65L BrewZilla, and the accessories I want to tack on all just became available. However, I see on the product page it's still in pre-order status and expected to be fulfilled starting in August. I don't plan on installing a 220V in my house until I remodel in the fall, so is there any benefit to ordering now, getting the unit in August sometime, and sitting on it? Or are there planned updates (ex. circutboards, hardware, etc.) that would make it a better idea to order closer to when I can actually use the unit? I would hate to wait until later in the year to order, only to have it back-ordered again, not getting it until late winter.
I don't believe the 4.0 will be available until 2022, at least thats what I saw on an interview with Kai in April so the benefit if you order now is you're guaranteed to get it when then come across the pacific.

FWIW, I bought mine around the same time and it sat in my basement boxed up for 11 months and runs like a charm.
 

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The BrewZilla V4 was supposed to be released in 2020. When I contacted KegLand at the start of this year they said they were having trouble with it and it wouldn’t be released until mid year. Now they are talking a possible 2022 release.

I decided not to wait and bought the 65L V3.1.1 version and am glad I did. I’ve done five brews on it now, they are the best five beers I have made and I have learnt a ton about all grain. My first competition is this weekend.

In your shoes I would still jump in and buy the BrewZilla now. The 65L V3.1.1. Is a great unit with all the bugs of the earlier models fixed.
 

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There's no doubt that the new one will be buggy ( which you'd need to wait a year for minumu ) and it'll be the revision that is better. Tends to be the way of kegland, get something on the market, and modify by the real world tests / failures. Hence you don't really see the flow control keg connector, it just didn't work well.
Bigger volume has given me much more option and peace of mind from reduced boilover risk ( touch wood never had one on smaller system ), control is better and outcome very impressive.
I did notice the wort was boiling an the temp was 2 celsius lower the other day so recalibrated the temp probe, so my mashes were probably all slightly off as well. My fault I never checked it when I got it or at intervals, so I don't know whether it wandered or has always been off whack.
 

Cloud Surfer

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I do like buying late model products that have matured and had all the early development finished. Given their track record, I figure V4 will be another bug fest, and I might line up for V4.1 or later models once it gets sorted out. I do like the connectivity they are talking about and having the controller at the top of the unit. But they are nice to have features that won’t necessary make better beer.
 

DuncB

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I do like buying late model products that have matured and had all the early development finished. Given their track record, I figure V4 will be another bug fest, and I might line up for V4.1 or later models once it gets sorted out. I do like the connectivity they are talking about and having the controller at the top of the unit. But they are nice to have features that won’t necessary make better beer.
And you could just get a custom PID and fit that as an upgrade, it integrates with wifi control so you wouldn't need to bend down as well as better control. Then drill for a bottom drain hole, make the sight gauge easier to clean, fit a whirlpool port and make a truptrapper.
Then you'll probably find you have a version 5 .

Good luck with the competition.
 

Cloud Surfer

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And you could just get a custom PID and fit that as an upgrade, it integrates with wifi control so you wouldn't need to bend down as well as better control. Then drill for a bottom drain hole, make the sight gauge easier to clean, fit a whirlpool port and make a truptrapper.
Then you'll probably find you have a version 5 .

Good luck with the competition.
Sounds like you should go into production and beat them to version 5.

I do want to improve my whirlpool method, and was going to give the whirlpool arm a try. However, now you mention it, how would you add a dedicated whirlpool port to a BrewZilla?
 

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FWIW:

MoreBeer is showing all kinds of electric brewing equipment on sale. I did not see any mention about equipment being on backorder.


Williams is showing systems shipping.
 

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Sounds like you should go into production and beat them to version 5.

I do want to improve my whirlpool method, and was going to give the whirlpool arm a try. However, now you mention it, how would you add a dedicated whirlpool port to a BrewZilla?
Well
Take the tap out of the bottom. Fit one of these
Whirlpool Fitting with Bulkhead - 1/2" MPT
Source it from SS brewtech in US though.
Then need a

and a means to connect it.

OR you might be able to use this
directly plugged into the hole the tap came out, you might need to adjust the bend in the racking arm.

OR

and you would need the bulkhead triclamp either welded in or use one of these
and some clamps to use it.

I couldn't get any of those parts so actually just attach the recirc tube to the end of the tap ( using it as the valve ) and then have a 90 degree elbow and some stainless steel pipe bent at an angle. Not optimum but I wanted to to test it worked in theory before going proper and haven't got round to that yet. You can just see it at about 10 oclock in the picture.
IMG_20210530_172537.jpg

Seems to work okay.

I empty via the drain port and so don't use the tap for anything. Incidentally the flow leaves via the recirc tube and then through the coolossus and then to the whirlpool so it's quite effective.
 

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That’s awesome stuff Dunc, thanks. You’ve given me some great ideas I hadn’t considered before. I’ll rig something up through the tap so I can whirlpool, rather than use a seperate whirlpool arm. I can see now that will be a better, cleaner solution.
 

DuncB

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That’s awesome stuff Dunc, thanks. You’ve given me some great ideas I hadn’t considered before. I’ll rig something up through the tap so I can whirlpool, rather than use a seperate whirlpool arm. I can see now that will be a better, cleaner solution.
I fancied putting a three way valve in the up pipe to the recirc tubing to make it all a bit neater.
Probably more efficient as wouldn't need to go up as high, I could then swap coolossus in and out easier and also consider getting a hoprocket.
So cheap this homebrew hobby"
 

Sammy86

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Had another successful brew day today...84% BH efficiency but it was a MESS in the tun.

I believe I have to make the gap wider on me mill...too much dust unfortunately.

Anyhoo, 12 gallon split batch one with Lithuanian Farmhouse Ale yeast and the other half 34/70.

Looking forward to both beers!

:mug:
 

Cloud Surfer

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Had another successful brew day today...84% BH efficiency but it was a MESS in the tun.

I believe I have to make the gap wider on me mill...too much dust unfortunately.

Anyhoo, 12 gallon split batch one with Lithuanian Farmhouse Ale yeast and the other half 34/70.

Looking forward to both beers!

:mug:
Out of interest what gap are you using? I’m surprised by how tight some people go, and wondering if that’s purely to chase better efficiency. I have mine set at 1.1mm/.043”. At that the crush looks nice with no flour at all.

I get up to 88% efficiency with small grain bills under 6kg in the 65L BrewZilla. That drops quite a bit as the load increases. I used 16kg of malt for my Barley Wine and got only 50% efficiency, mainly because I had no water left over for sparge. But I did end up with 22L of 15% ABV beer. Given that, I couldn’t care less what efficiency I get, except I’m trying to get better at planning what I will get, so I can get as close to my OG as possible.
 

DuncB

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@Sammy86
What do you mean a mess in the tun?
You have a great efficiency there, any numbers you can let us know to aid our dial ins, I'd accept a mess in the mash tun if my BHE improved by 12%.

Perhaps try doing half the grain at the current mill gap and half a bit wider and see how that affects things.
 
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