New England IPA "Northeast" style IPA

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Rob2010SS

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Honestly I’d expect a massive fruit salad of a beer with very little in terms of being able to identify any of the individual hops. That’s not to say that it won’t be good....it’ll probably be great. But any time I’ve used 5 different hop varieties it gets kind of muddy, and just generically “hoppy.”

I don’t mean this to be negative AT ALL. But that is what I would expect.
That's good advice. I typically stick to 3 varieties. That's what I've done with all NEIPA's I've made. I've seen other examples of both commercial beers and home brews where they go with more varieties and I thought I'd try it. My thought process was by splitting it up between 3 on hotside and 2 on cold side, it might help layer some of the flavors that I was hoping to get.

However, if that's not the case, then I'll have to re-think this.
 

Rob2010SS

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I could do....

Keep Citra, Mosaic, Idaho 7 hotside
Change Dry hop to also be Citra Mosaic
Keeps it to 3 varieties

Or...

Keep Citra, Mosaic, Idaho 7 hotside
Change Dry Hop to be Citra Amarillo
Drops it to 4 varieties
 

HopsAreGood

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I could do....

Keep Citra, Mosaic, Idaho 7 hotside
Change Dry hop to also be Citra Mosaic
Keeps it to 3 varieties

Or...

Keep Citra, Mosaic, Idaho 7 hotside
Change Dry Hop to be Citra Amarillo
Drops it to 4 varieties
I mean it really just depends what you’re going for. Your original recipe/plan will definitely create a great beer. It’s also not like five is the magic number of hops where it gets muddy. It can get muddy with four hops or even three hops… There are so many variables. Again, “muddy” is not necessarily a bad thing. Tons of amazing beers use lots of different hops.

I’ve personally been trying to stick to two maybe three different hops Max lately, and have definitely been enjoying the results. I apologize if I’m making you overthink this but just giving my two cents as to what I would expect.

Just ask yourself if you’d rather have a really nice wide spectrum-fruity kind of beer, Or a more focused one where you are specifically interested in featuring one or two specific hops.

For example… Electric jellyfish from Pint House Pizza in Austin Texas is a really highly regarded beer, and they use 6 to 7 different hop varieties in it. Conversely, most of the Trillium beers focus on only one hop while layering in a little bit of Columbus in most of them. Both breweries are making great beers, just slightly different in the approach that they are taking.

I had a triple IPA from a local brewery the other day that had Citra, Citra cryo, Mosaic, mosaic Cryo, Nelson, galaxy, and some Sabro. It was a total hop salad but the flavor and aroma was incredible. I’d be lying if I said could pick out any of those individual hops, but in this case that wasn’t what they were going for and it really didn’t matter.
 
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Rob2010SS

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I mean it really just depends what you’re going for. Your original recipe/plan will definitely create a great beer. It’s also not like five is the magic number of hops where it gets muddy. It can get muddy with four hops or even three hops… There are so many variables. Again, “muddy” is not necessarily a bad thing. Tons of amazing beers use lots of different hops.

I’ve personally been trying to stick to two maybe three different hops Max lately, and have definitely been enjoying the results. I apologize if I’m making you overthink this but just giving my two cents as to what I would expect.

Just ask yourself if you’d rather have a really nice wide spectrum-fruity kind of beer, Or a more focused one where you are specifically interested in featuring one or two specific hops.

For example… Electric jellyfish from Pint House Pizza in Austin Texas is a really highly regarded beer, and they use 6 to 7 different hop varieties in it. Conversely, most of the Trillium beers focus on only one hop while layering in a little bit of Columbus in most of them. Both breweries are making great beers, just slightly different in the approach that they are taking.

I had a triple IPA from a local brewery the other day that had Citra, Citra cryo, Mosaic, mosaic Cryo, Nelson, galaxy, and some Sabro. It was a total hop salad but the flavor and aroma was incredible. I’d be lying if I said could pick out any of those individual hops, but in this case that wasn’t what they were going for and it really didn’t matter.
That makes sense to me. I do think that for my tastes and for the crowd who drinks our beer, a nice wide spectrum fruity kind of beer is what I'm after.

Our last NEIPA was a huge hit with our group of friends and that consisted of Citra, Mosaic, El dorado throughout both hotside and cold side. It was a great beer! I consistently chose that over the commercial examples in our fridge. What I experienced with that beer is that it gave off a ton of the tropical fruit flavors and aromas (pineapple, passionfruit) but none of the citrusy sweet fruits. My goal with this one is to try and incorporate a bit of the citrusy sweet as well.

Thanks for the information. I appreciate your insight and it makes sense. I think I'll stick with the plan and see how it goes! Maybe I'll come away from this hating it in the end haha.
 

HopsAreGood

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That makes sense to me. I do think that for my tastes and for the crowd who drinks our beer, a nice wide spectrum fruity kind of beer is what I'm after.

Our last NEIPA was a huge hit with our group of friends and that consisted of Citra, Mosaic, El dorado throughout both hotside and cold side. It was a great beer! I consistently chose that over the commercial examples in our fridge. What I experienced with that beer is that it gave off a ton of the tropical fruit flavors and aromas (pineapple, passionfruit) but none of the citrusy sweet fruits. My goal with this one is to try and incorporate a bit of the citrusy sweet as well.

Thanks for the information. I appreciate your insight and it makes sense. I think I'll stick with the plan and see how it goes! Maybe I'll come away from this hating it in the end haha.
I’m sure it will be fantastic. Report back on how it turns out if you can remember!
 

R.A.I.D

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Has anyone tried brewing with Idaho-7 as the only hot side hop?
 

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Planning to brew this weekend and have Idaho 7, Moutere, and Nectaron (inspired by noob_brewer) on hand. Here’s what I’m thinking, what would you do differently?

Brew Method: All Grain
Style Name: Specialty IPA: New England IPA
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 7.5 gallons (ending kettle volume)
Boil Size: 9 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.060
Efficiency: 80% (ending kettle)


STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.072
Final Gravity: 1.016
ABV (standard): 7.28%
IBU (tinseth): 75.93
SRM (morey): 4.25
Mash pH: 5.6

FERMENTABLES:
15 lb - Brewers Malt 2-Row (83.3%)
3 lb - Wheat Malt, White (16.7%)

HOPS:
MASH
1 oz - Amarillo (8.6 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 8.6, Use: Mash, IBU: 3.98

BOIL
1 oz - Amarillo (8.6 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 8.6, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 19.96

WHIRLPOOL
4 oz - BSG - Idaho 7 (14.1 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 14.1, Use: Whirlpool for 30 min at 180 °F, IBU: 22.53
2 oz - Moutere (18.5 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 18.5, Use: Whirlpool for 30 min at 180 °F, IBU: 18.48
2 oz - Nectaron, Type: Pellet, AA: 11, Use: Whirlpool for 30 min at 180 °F, IBU: 10.99

DRY HOP
5 oz - Moutere (18.5 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 18.5, Use: Dry Hop for 3 days
5 oz - Nectaron, Type: Pellet, AA: 11, Use: Dry Hop for 3 days

MASH GUIDELINES:
1) Strike, Temp: 149 F, Time: 60 min, Amount: 6.75 gal
2) Fly Sparge, Temp: 149 F, Time: 50 min, Amount: 5.5 gal
Starting Mash Thickness: 1.5 qt/lb

OTHER INGREDIENTS:
8 g - Calcium Chloride (dihydrate), Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash
4 g - Gypsum, Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash

YEAST:
RVA Yeast Labs - RVA 104 Hoptopper Ale
Starter: No
Form: Liquid
Attenuation (avg): 77.5%
Flocculation: Medium-Low
Optimum Temp: 64 - 76 F
Pitch Rate: 1.0 (M cells / ml / deg P)
Additional Yeast: RVA 132 Manchester Ale

PRIMING:
Method: co2
CO2 Level: 2.25 Volumes

TARGET WATER PROFILE:
Profile Name: 5716
Ca2: 100
Mg2: 5
Na: 20
Cl: 100
SO4: 100
HCO3: 48
Water Notes:
phosphoric acid to pH 4.8-4.9 post boil
 

Rob2010SS

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Planning to brew this weekend and have Idaho 7, Moutere, and Nectaron (inspired by noob_brewer) on hand. Here’s what I’m thinking, what would you do differently?

Brew Method: All Grain
Style Name: Specialty IPA: New England IPA
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 7.5 gallons (ending kettle volume)
Boil Size: 9 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.060
Efficiency: 80% (ending kettle)


STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.072
Final Gravity: 1.016
ABV (standard): 7.28%
IBU (tinseth): 75.93
SRM (morey): 4.25
Mash pH: 5.6

FERMENTABLES:
15 lb - Brewers Malt 2-Row (83.3%)
3 lb - Wheat Malt, White (16.7%)
**I'd increase the wheat or add malted oats as well. I personally prefer to have this at 30% in mine, but to each their own. I like the flavor and appearance I get from 30%.

HOPS:
MASH
1 oz - Amarillo (8.6 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 8.6, Use: Mash, IBU: 3.98

BOIL
1 oz - Amarillo (8.6 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 8.6, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 19.96
**I prefer to have my bittering addition down around 8-10 IBUs. The perceived bitterness you get from all the late additions on top of this, in my opinion, becomes too much bitterness.

WHIRLPOOL
4 oz - BSG - Idaho 7 (14.1 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 14.1, Use: Whirlpool for 30 min at 180 °F, IBU: 22.53
2 oz - Moutere (18.5 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 18.5, Use: Whirlpool for 30 min at 180 °F, IBU: 18.48
2 oz - Nectaron, Type: Pellet, AA: 11, Use: Whirlpool for 30 min at 180 °F, IBU: 10.99

DRY HOP
5 oz - Moutere (18.5 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 18.5, Use: Dry Hop for 3 days
5 oz - Nectaron, Type: Pellet, AA: 11, Use: Dry Hop for 3 days

MASH GUIDELINES:
1) Strike, Temp: 149 F, Time: 60 min, Amount: 6.75 gal
2) Fly Sparge, Temp: 149 F, Time: 50 min, Amount: 5.5 gal
Starting Mash Thickness: 1.5 qt/lb
**I'd go higher on mash temp. I like 154F myself.

OTHER INGREDIENTS:
8 g - Calcium Chloride (dihydrate), Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash
4 g - Gypsum, Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash

YEAST:
RVA Yeast Labs - RVA 104 Hoptopper Ale
Starter: No
Form: Liquid
Attenuation (avg): 77.5%
Flocculation: Medium-Low
Optimum Temp: 64 - 76 F
Pitch Rate: 1.0 (M cells / ml / deg P)
Additional Yeast: RVA 132 Manchester Ale

PRIMING:
Method: co2
CO2 Level: 2.25 Volumes

TARGET WATER PROFILE:
Profile Name: 5716
Ca2: 100
Mg2: 5
Na: 20
Cl: 100
SO4: 100 <-- I prefer a 3:1 ratio of Cl:SO4 myself.
HCO3: 48
Water Notes:
phosphoric acid to pH 4.8-4.9 post boil
My comments above. I'm no expert in this style so I just gave my opinions.
 

Rob2010SS

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Curious on adjusting wort pH post boil. I might mess around with that this time. Is that done pre or post whirlpool? I would think it would get done post whirlpool....

I think I've read that pH 5.0 is a good target post boil for this style?

Is there a calculator somewhere to determine how much acid is needed to adjust the pH in the boil kettle?
 

GRBC

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Curious on adjusting wort pH post boil. I might mess around with that this time. Is that done pre or post whirlpool? I would think it would get done post whirlpool....

I think I've read that pH 5.0 is a good target post boil for this style?

Is there a calculator somewhere to determine how much acid is needed to adjust the pH in the boil kettle?
I got the idea from the Scott Janish blog. IIRC, they do it after the boil & before the WP.
 

Noob_Brewer

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Has anyone tried brewing with Idaho-7 as the only hot side hop?
I did a pale ale with all Idaho 7 last year. It was pretty solid overall. You can see my review of it here in the base pale ale thread American IPA - Base Pale Ale Recipe for Single hop Beers

When Ive been using I7 in my NEIPAs it has been mostly on the hot side but not exclusive as Ive used other hops on hot side with it but focused more on I7 on the hot side compared to other hops. Its a great hop. My overall impression is that if you pair it with other herbal/dank hops, the herbal ness of I7 will pull through but if you pair it with other tropical/citrus hops on the hot side, I7 will have a strong orange like quality to it. So I think it plays well with different types of hops. I nearly always sample my beers from the hydrometer sample pre-dry hop which has helped me immensely at figuring out what my hot side hops will be bringing to the table in the finished beer. More times than not, I7 when used on the hot side will impart a nice overripe orange type flavor. Like it a lot. Hope this helps ya.
 

midegrou

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I want to do something a bit more piney, like Treehouse Sap. I believe Sap uses Chinook and Simcoe, but I have a lot of CTZ I need to use. Anyone try a CTZ Simcoe dual hop? Any recommendations on ratios for hot side and whirlpool?
 

Rob2010SS

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I did a pale ale with all Idaho 7 last year. It was pretty solid overall. You can see my review of it here in the base pale ale thread American IPA - Base Pale Ale Recipe for Single hop Beers

When Ive been using I7 in my NEIPAs it has been mostly on the hot side but not exclusive as Ive used other hops on hot side with it but focused more on I7 on the hot side compared to other hops. Its a great hop. My overall impression is that if you pair it with other herbal/dank hops, the herbal ness of I7 will pull through but if you pair it with other tropical/citrus hops on the hot side, I7 will have a strong orange like quality to it. So I think it plays well with different types of hops. I nearly always sample my beers from the hydrometer sample pre-dry hop which has helped me immensely at figuring out what my hot side hops will be bringing to the table in the finished beer. More times than not, I7 when used on the hot side will impart a nice overripe orange type flavor. Like it a lot. Hope this helps ya.
This is awesome! Thank you! Being paired with Citra and Mosaic on hot side, you definitely gave me hope that I7 will bring the qualities to the table that I'm looking for.

Will report back how this turns out.
 

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I'd be careful with CTZ. It can make a garlic/onion/dank bomb depending on the lot #. i dont use it much anymore. too bad b/c i made a fantastic CTZ beer like 5 yrs ago.

I want to do something a bit more piney, like Treehouse Sap. I believe Sap uses Chinook and Simcoe, but I have a lot of CTZ I need to use. Anyone try a CTZ Simcoe dual hop? Any recommendations on ratios for hot side and whirlpool?
 

ihavenonickname

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Some follow up hop opinions from a random guy on the internet:

I agree with @HopsAreGood that with a complex 5+hop recipe it gets hard or impossible to pick out distinct feature of the hop or the technique used (WP temps, timing dry hop timing. (But hey Pliney and HopFu do this!) As a home brewer part of my motivation is the learning/feedback loop so I know what is contributing what. For me that means sticking to 1-3 hops for a single WP addition and a si gel dry hop post ferm.

I’ve loved the 2020 Strata I got, all fruit and resin. I used it with mosaic once and with riwaka and Nelson. Both killer.

I7 is all the rage these days but I wanna pump the brakes on that one, the black tea quality is not my favorite I think it still does best in combo with some of the more “premier” hops. Why doesn’t the other survivable king, Bravo, get as much love? Cuz it just doesn’t taste as good as some others! Doesn’t matter how high the survivables are!

I have fermenting a Citra/HBC 586 right now that has one of the best (all sweet fruit) aromas coming out of the DH keg, it’s amazing! I’ll try to follow up with it.
 
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Curious on adjusting wort pH post boil. I might mess around with that this time. Is that done pre or post whirlpool? I would think it would get done post whirlpool....

I think I've read that pH 5.0 is a good target post boil for this style?

Is there a calculator somewhere to determine how much acid is needed to adjust the pH in the boil kettle?
Do you currently adjust your water ph for the mash with acid? I dont personally adjust my ph after the boil, as long as I hit my mash ph (usually 5.3) then I dont worry beyond that. That being said I have read people adjusting post boil, I am curious to take a reading at that point just to see where it stands, I always assumed high 4's.
 

Rob2010SS

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Do you currently adjust your water ph for the mash with acid? I dont personally adjust my ph after the boil, as long as I hit my mash ph (usually 5.3) then I dont worry beyond that. That being said I have read people adjusting post boil, I am curious to take a reading at that point just to see where it stands, I always assumed high 4's.
Yes, I do, when needed. However, this batch, based on Bru'n Water, acid or acid malt isn't needed. The water additions with my RO water get the pH to an acceptable level on it's own.

I haven't worried about post boil pH before, but it's one of those things I've been reading about and thinking about trying.
 
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Yeah, ok I see. Well I don't know of a calculator but I imagine some of the guys that post regularly in the "brewing science" threads would maybe be able to point you in the right direction. I would assume that it would be close to 5.0 and I cant imagine it would take much to get it there. I am also curious as to why this post boil ph is "ideal" is it due to the high dry hopping rate increasing the ph during fermentation?
 

Rob2010SS

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This is one of the comments from page 359 of this thread...

- Consider adding additional acid (like phosphoric acid) to the kettle (targeting 4.8–4.9 post-boil pH) when brewing higher alcohol and highly dry hopped DIPAs to counter dry hop pH rise for better drinkability. Post-fermentation acid adjustment to 4.2–4.4 pH can also help.
 
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Aaaaand then I go glance at the brew science tab and there it sits right at the top. But they are talking about making a kettle addition in the boil to achieve your desired post boil ph, similar to making your water adjustment before you mash in. Looks like silver-is-money has a calculator for "kettle ph"
 

HopsAreGood

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According to Janish dry hopping at a rate of 1 pound per barrel (or approximately 2.5 ounces for a 5 gallon batch) Will raise the final pH of the finished beer .1. So a beer that finishes after fermentation with a pH of 4.2 and is then dry hopped with 2.5 ounces, will finish with a pH of 4.3. This calculation is not 100% accurate, but from his experience and scientific data it is about as close as you can get to predicting what it will be. If you know how far the pH will drop with a given yeast during the entirety of fermentation, you can then factor in what your final pH will be after your dry hops. I’ve seen different preferences as to what the best final pH is, so that is up for debate. But in terms of knowing what your post boil pH is, you can certainly use it to factor in what your final pH will be considering the drop during fermentation, and then the rise from your dry hops.

For example: If I know based on my experience that my yeast combined with my grain bill will drop the PH 1 full point during the entirety of fermentation, and I want a final pH of 4.4, and I will be dry hopping about 7.5 to 8 ounces, then I need to shoot for a pH of 4.1 post fermentation, which would require a post boil pH of 5.1.

 
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Also I don't know what acid you use but they likely mention phosphoric acid at this point because it will not change the flavor of your batch, where say lactic acid can show up in the flavor of your final product.
 

Ogilthorpe2

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Brewing Up a batch tonight. 2.5 gallons.

On hand, I have:
3oz of Citra
2oz Galaxy
2oz Amarillo
1oz Azacca
2oz cryo Azacca
1oz Warrior

Having trouble what combo to go with. Was thinking some combo of Citra, Galaxy, Azacca.

Anyone have any suggestions?
 

Rob2010SS

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I did a 1:1 ratio of Citra/Azacca previously and was really pleased with it. I don't remember exact flavor descriptors of it but I do remember it being very citrus forward.

I like your idea of Cit/Gal/Aza.

Amarillo I don't have a ton of experience with but I just picked up some Amarillo cryo that I'll be using to dry hop in a couple of weeks.
 
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So I kegged my latest neipa on wednesday. This is the one I brewed with more oats and no honey malt trying to get the bright color pop, which definitely did the trick :ban:. Also this was hopped with simcoe, mosaic, and azacca. I am very pleased with this, mosaic took the stage and the azacca compliments it great. simcoe was all hot side, thanks for everyones input, this is an excellent beer and at only 2 days in the keg I know it will only get better.
20210506_184410.jpg
 

secretlevel

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If you guys remember the GM Strains post from Scott Janish, there's some really cool stuff going on around this subject in the industry. Omega (who are local to me in Chicago) are currently refining and prepping their version of bound hop-thiol unlocking strain and my club gets a first taste. A club member just kegged his version of the IPA and said he was pretty impressed with the notes:
"Rather big papaya, honeydew, and mango. Seriously, never had a beer anything like this before!"

I'll be tasting the beers brewed with it later this month and Omega are also planning a public release of this strain, so soon enough I'll be trying it myself!

OmegaBeer.jpg
 

aaronm13

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Rebrewing my Citra/Nelson DIPA and London Ale 3 has crapped out on me again at 1.030. I hate this strain so much. Third generation from this pack and have had this issue 2 out of the 3 brews. Think I'm going back to London Fog after this.

Mashed at 66 C/150.8 F and started fermentation at 67F. After giving the fermenter a good shake and raised the temperature to 74F. Hopefully this gets me down a bit more. My last brew of this finished at 1.022 after a lot of shaking and raising the temps. Found it a bit on the sweet side so 1.030 is going to be undrinkable.
 

R.A.I.D

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Rebrewing my Citra/Nelson DIPA and London Ale 3 has crapped out on me again at 1.030.
LA3 needs double the amount of oxygen as a normal liquid yeast. The problem might be that you are just shaking the fermenter.
 

aaronm13

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LA3 needs double the amount of oxygen as a normal liquid yeast. The problem might be that you are just shaking the fermenter.
No, pure oxygen for 60 seconds. Didn't use it on the first brew as I was out of O2 but gave it a good blast this time
 

HopsAreGood

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Rebrewing my Citra/Nelson DIPA and London Ale 3 has crapped out on me again at 1.030. I hate this strain so much. Third generation from this pack and have had this issue 2 out of the 3 brews. Think I'm going back to London Fog after this.

Mashed at 66 C/150.8 F and started fermentation at 67F. After giving the fermenter a good shake and raised the temperature to 74F. Hopefully this gets me down a bit more. My last brew of this finished at 1.022 after a lot of shaking and raising the temps. Found it a bit on the sweet side so 1.030 is going to be undrinkable.
What was your starting gravity? I’ve had LA3 crap out on me numerous times as well, but it’s a low attenuator anyway. (As you know)
 

aaronm13

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What was your starting gravity? I’ve had LA3 crap out on me numerous times as well, but it’s a low attenuator anyway. (As you know)
OG was 1.080 and fermentation started really quick. I noticed my tilt hadn't changed in 2 days but I don't trust that so took a hydrometer sample this morning and unfortunately the Tilt was pretty right. I'm sitting at 60.7 attenuation now which even for this strain is terrible. I brewed on Monday so it's day 7 now. Going to have to find a new strain or go back to London Fog. I like the sounds of your dry yeast blend of Verdant and New England. Just not a fan of dry yeast but might be worth a shot.
 

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OG was 1.080 and fermentation started really quick. I noticed my tilt hadn't changed in 2 days but I don't trust that so took a hydrometer sample this morning and unfortunately the Tilt was pretty right. I'm sitting at 60.7 attenuation now which even for this strain is terrible. I brewed on Monday so it's day 7 now. Going to have to find a new strain or go back to London Fog. I like the sounds of your dry yeast blend of Verdant and New England. Just not a fan of dry yeast but might be worth a shot.
Yeah. I’ve had the same issues with LA3. Super annoying. I think adding some dextrose in the future might help but not everyone likes doing that. They list it as 71-75% attenuation and by my calculation you’re currently sitting at 62.5%. At this point you’d need to get to 1.023 just to hit the 71. I’ve had good success with just the verdant (no mixing with the dry Conan) getting 75-78% typically. So if you like the LA3 character maybe try just the verdant yeast by itself. The Lallemand pitch calculator makes it super easy to pitch the exact amount of yeast needed without having to mess with starters. Just punch in the OG, the amount of wort, and then weigh the dry yeast and pitch.
 

beervoid

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OG was 1.080 and fermentation started really quick. I noticed my tilt hadn't changed in 2 days but I don't trust that so took a hydrometer sample this morning and unfortunately the Tilt was pretty right. I'm sitting at 60.7 attenuation now which even for this strain is terrible. I brewed on Monday so it's day 7 now. Going to have to find a new strain or go back to London Fog. I like the sounds of your dry yeast blend of Verdant and New England. Just not a fan of dry yeast but might be worth a shot.
Strange i've gone up to 10 generations without any problems, if anything it gets more attenuative.
How are you harvesting? Are you sure you are getting healthy yeast?
 

aaronm13

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Yeah. I’ve had the same issues with LA3. Super annoying. I think adding some dextrose in the future might help but not everyone likes doing that. They list it as 71-75% attenuation and by my calculation you’re currently sitting at 62.5%. At this point you’d need to get to 1.023 just to hit the 71. I’ve had good success with just the verdant (no mixing with the dry Conan) getting 75-78% typically. So if you like the LA3 character maybe try just the verdant yeast by itself. The Lallemand pitch calculator makes it super easy to pitch the exact amount of yeast needed without having to mess with starters. Just punch in the OG, the amount of wort, and then weigh the dry yeast and pitch.
There's 4% dextrose in the recipe. I'd be delighted to hit 1.023 at this stage. I used the Verdant dry yeast once and wasn't blown away by it. I had no signs of fermentation after 36 hours of pitching so I added another pack that I rehydrated. This took off like a rocket and got down to 1.015. Not sure if overpitching had anything to do with the impression I got from it. 2 packs into a 1.065 wort.

Wouldn't mind but I was brewing this for a competition in a couple of weeks and don't think I'll have time to do another brew for it.
 

aaronm13

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Strange i've gone up to 10 generations without any problems, if anything it gets more attenuative.
How are you harvesting? Are you sure you are getting healthy yeast?
I'm over building the starter and pouring off enough into a Mason jar. Roughly gives me 60 billion cells. I work off this figure when building up for the next brew.
 

HopsAreGood

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At this point I’d just pitch some more yeast. If you’re at 1.030 then there are sugars in there that can be consumed. Just give it some more yeast (if you have some) and see where that takes you. I had a 1.080 beer crap out on me at 1.036 and threw in an entire pack of verdant. Took it down to 1.020 in a few days and the finished beer was excellent.
 

aaronm13

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At this point I’d just pitch some more yeast. If you’re at 1.030 then there are sugars in there that can be consumed. Just give it some more yeast (if you have some) and see where that takes you. I had a 1.080 beer crap out on me at 1.036 and threw in an entire pack of verdant. Took it down to 1.020 in a few days and the finished beer was excellent.
The only dry yeast I have is US-05, would that mess with the flavor profile too much? if not it'll take me a few days to build up more LA3. I could always order some Verdant but would probably be Wednesday before I got it.

WIth a dry yeast would you rehydrate it or just sprinkle on top?
 

HopsAreGood

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The only dry yeast I have is US-05, would that mess with the flavor profile too much? if not it'll take me a few days to build up more LA3. I could always order some Verdant but would probably be Wednesday before I got it.

WIth a dry yeast would you rehydrate it or just sprinkle on top?
If you’re at 1.030 from 1.080 then the far majority of yeast character has likely already been established. I wouldn’t think twice about giving it some US-05 which is super clean anyway. I’d personally just direct pitch it...although others may disagree. I’ve never been able to detect any issues at all from just sprinkling dry yeast on top.
 

aaronm13

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If you’re at 1.030 from 1.080 then the far majority of yeast character has likely already been established. I wouldn’t think twice about giving it some US-05 which is super clean anyway. I’d personally just direct pitch it...although others may disagree. I’ve never been able to detect any issues at all from just sprinkling dry yeast on top.
Thanks for all the help. Think I'll try the US-05. I've messaged a friend who might have some of the Verdant. Really good idea to have a few packs of dry yeast on hand for an emergency like this.
 
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