New England IPA "Northeast" style IPA

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HopsAreGood

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Thanks for all the help. Think I'll try the US-05. I've messaged a friend who might have some of the Verdant. Really good idea to have a few packs of dry yeast on hand for an emergency like this.
It’ll definitely get you down closer to where you want to be in terms of final gravity. Like I said, you have consumable sugars in there but your original yeast just crapped out. Simple solution is to just give it some more hungry yeast. Good luck, let us know how it turns out!
 

anteater8

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That's good advice. I typically stick to 3 varieties. That's what I've done with all NEIPA's I've made. I've seen other examples of both commercial beers and home brews where they go with more varieties and I thought I'd try it. My thought process was by splitting it up between 3 on hotside and 2 on cold side, it might help layer some of the flavors that I was hoping to get.

However, if that's not the case, then I'll have to re-think this.
I did the exact same thing! I usually use one to three varieties but I had bunch of 2 oz hop bags that I wanted to get through so I decided to use them all at once. I was inspired by Modern Times, I've had some incredible NEIPAs from them with like 7 varieties. Here's my recipe and notes:

17.5 lb 2 row
0.25 lb Honey malt

0.5 oz Warrior (19 IBU)
1 oz Simcoe 10 min (12 IBU)
1 oz CTZ 0 min
2 oz Mosaic whirlpool (30 min at 170)
1 oz CTZ whirlpool (30 min at 170)
1 oz Simcoe whirlpool (30 min at 170)
2 oz Amarillo dry hop #1
2 oz Citra dry hop #1
2 oz Idaho 7 dry hop #2
2 oz Strata dry hop #2

Notes: lots of mango, pineapple, dankness and grapefruit. Delicious beer and I would experiment with more hop varieties again.
 

aaronm13

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It’ll definitely get you down closer to where you want to be in terms of final gravity. Like I said, you have consumable sugars in there but your original yeast just crapped out. Simple solution is to just give it some more hungry yeast. Good luck, let us know how it turns out!
Will do. My friend hasn't any of the Verdant yeast so I'm going to use the US-05 and see what happens. Am I likely to dry it out too much with that yeast and should I throw in the whole pack?
 

HopsAreGood

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Will do. My friend hasn't any of the Verdant yeast so I'm going to use the US-05 and see what happens. Am I likely to dry it out too much with that yeast and should I throw in the whole pack?
Unfortunately it’s a bit of a guessing game at this point. I really don’t know how much to recommend or exactly how dry it will end up. If it were me I’d prob use 1/4-1/2 of the pack. Your mileage may vary.
 

aaronm13

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Unfortunately it’s a bit of a guessing game at this point. I really don’t know how much to recommend or exactly how dry it will end up. If it were me I’d prob use 1/4-1/2 of the pack. Your mileage may vary.
True. I could always add a bit more if needed but the environment isn't great for the new yeast now. I'll try half and see as us-05 is a bit of a beast.
 

stickyfinger

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1.060 or 1.065 is the max OG I will go with an all-malt IPA when using LAIII or Juice.

OG was 1.080 and fermentation started really quick. I noticed my tilt hadn't changed in 2 days but I don't trust that so took a hydrometer sample this morning and unfortunately the Tilt was pretty right. I'm sitting at 60.7 attenuation now which even for this strain is terrible. I brewed on Monday so it's day 7 now. Going to have to find a new strain or go back to London Fog. I like the sounds of your dry yeast blend of Verdant and New England. Just not a fan of dry yeast but might be worth a shot.
 

HopsAreGood

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A friend of my swears by it and her got me to use it. He doesn't brew anything above 1.065 so he can't understand how I'm having issues. LA3 is a disaster for double ipas, I've 3 brews to prove it.
I’m not sure why you had no activity until 36 hours with the verdant yeast, but every time I’ve used it by itself I’ve had slow bubbles by 8 hours, and totally raging by 24 hours. Brew a 1080 beer, mash at 152, and pitch two packs of verdant and there’s no reason you shouldn’t end up at 1.020. 75% attenuation and approximately 8% beer is super easy to achieve.
 

aaronm13

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I’m not sure why you had no activity until 36 hours with the verdant yeast, but every time I’ve used it by itself I’ve had slow bubbles by 8 hours, and totally raging by 24 hours. Brew a 1080 beer, mash at 152, and pitch two packs of verdant and there’s no reason you shouldn’t end up at 1.020. 75% attenuation and approximately 8% beer is super easy to achieve.
Not sure either. Once I added the second pack it was flying within a few hours. Maybe a bad pack or something, The beer finished out at 1,016 too.

Added a half pack of US-05 last night and didn't see any signs of fermentation so resigned myself to the beer being a bust. Took a hydrometer sample and it's actually down to 1.022. Delighted to be honest. Really didn't think it was working. Hopefully with a bit of luck I might a few more points out of it. Thanks so much for all your help yesterday.
 

Dgallo

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Thought you guys might get a kick outta this. A new brewery opened in my local area. Look how they are describing their ipas. Haven’t tried their beer yet so won’t comment on its quality but talk about using buzz words for marketing
50815780-B312-4A95-B274-5C6BA44B5A7A.jpeg
 

HopsAreGood

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Thought you guys might get a kick outta this. A new brewery opened in my local area. Look how they are describing their ipas. Haven’t tried their beer yet so won’t comment on its quality but talk about using buzz words for marketing View attachment 728743
I mean...you simply HAVE to love those “biotransformed” iPas. It’s as if they started as one thing and ended up as something completely different!
🙄🙄🙄...lol!

Beertender: “what can I get for you?

Me: “I’d love to try one of your biotransformed ipas. How’s the one that was transformed by Citra and cascade? Sounds awesome and Ive heard that biotranformation makes it really juicy. Is that right?

Beertender: Yeah, it’s really good. 👍
 
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But ya know what, it will sell them some more beers to certain people. I can picture some one saying "oh man last night I had this awesome ipa, it was biotransformed with hops. soooo good!" reply: "wow dude, so what's biotransformed?" ummm ** google searching**
 

Noob_Brewer

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Thought you guys might get a kick outta this. A new brewery opened in my local area. Look how they are describing their ipas. Haven’t tried their beer yet so won’t comment on its quality but talk about using buzz words for marketing View attachment 728743
I feel bad for the bartenders at that brewery. I know I’d be asking them all sorts of questions like, “what actually happened during the bio transformation process?” Or “how do you get your beer to “bio transform”? 😂. Makes it sound like the beer has been converted into something other than beer. Hopefully they prep the bartenders (if they aren’t the owners) on questions like that. Lol. I also wouldn’t be surprised to hear “it’s our proprietary process” 😂. Joking aside, I hope that brewery makes good beer, would hate to see new breweries not do well. Always want to support local when possible.
 

HopsAreGood

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I feel bad for the bartenders at that brewery. I know I’d be asking them all sorts of questions like, “what actually happened during the bio transformation process?” Or “how do you get your beer to “bio transform”? 😂. Makes it sound like the beer has been converted into something other than beer. Hopefully they prep the bartenders (if they aren’t the owners) on questions like that. Lol. I also wouldn’t be surprised to hear “it’s our proprietary process” 😂. Joking aside, I hope that brewery makes good beer, would hate to see new breweries not do well. Always want to support local when possible.
I couldn’t agree more with you in terms of hoping all breweries do well. It’s kind of funny though because most of the people who post in this thread know so much more about these beers than most of the beer tenders, the people who work at breweries, and sometimes even the Brewers who make the beers.

I was at a local brewery last year, one that I’m actually quite fond of, and I had a question about one of the beers up on the board. It was hand written with chalk and it turned out that I couldn’t read it because it was kind of smudged, but the beer tender told me it said “DDH.” She told me that DDH meant that it was really good hops, and because I didn’t want to be a D**K, I just kind of shook my head and said oh, OK, thanks.

It is what it is.
 
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It's a little unfortunate, and the pres of my hb club pet peeve, when someone that works at a brewery doesn't know the basics. He rants about it occasionally when him and his wife go out, he doesn't make an ass out of them or anything but always lets us know his experiences, its a good laugh. In my opinion if your gonna work in a field you should at least know the basics, and if you dont then dont make something up, maybe say "ill find out and let you know" instead.
 

RCope

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I'd give them the benefit of the doubt...it seems they are just riffing on the whole "laboratory theme" and biotransformation just fits into their catchy lexicon. "Become a Lab Partner", "catalyst", "control group", "genes", etc...
 

Noob_Brewer

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I'd give them the benefit of the doubt...it seems they are just riffing on the whole "laboratory theme" and biotransformation just fits into their catchy lexicon. "Become a Lab Partner", "catalyst", "control group", "genes", etc...
Yup agreed. Didn't see the "become a lab partner" piece. give them credit for some catchy buzz phrases. Hope it works out for them after all catchy phrases and good marketing will get peeps into the door, but in order to keep them there is solid beer anyways, especially in new york where theres stiff competition.
 

Dgallo

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I'd give them the benefit of the doubt...it seems they are just riffing on the whole "laboratory theme" and biotransformation just fits into their catchy lexicon. "Become a Lab Partner", "catalyst", "control group", "genes", etc...
They both are pharmacists so yes it fits but marketing a buzzword abd using it incorrectly was more of what I was getting at. Hops don’t do the transforming, they are what is transformed.

I too hope they do well and will be checking them out next Sunday.
 

Noob_Brewer

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They both are pharmacists so yes it fits but marketing a buzzword abd using it incorrectly was more of what I was getting at. Hops don’t do the transforming, they are what is transformed.

I too hope they do well and will be checking them out next Sunday.
lol I agree. When I read that I was scratching my head too. But I actually wasn't sure if its technically inaccurate or not because it says "biotransformed WITH" hops and not "biotransformed BY" hops.
 

jerrylotto

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The only biotransformation going on in your fermentation (hopefully) is BY yeast TO fermentable compounds originating from grain, hops, or whatever other organics you add that they can find and use for the purposes of reproduction or growth. With (aka "in the presence of") does not seem to be too much of a stretch unless (as Noob_Brewer scratched his head over) they are using the word "with" to mean ("through the action of" aka "by"). Any other biotransformation would generatlly be termed "infection" and not something to celebrate. I'm more dubious about the first one that was "fermented with honey" as if the yeast were enjoying but otherwise ignoring it :)
 
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R.A.I.D

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I usually do cold crash both before and after dry hopping. And transfer the beer to a separate dry hop keg. And dry hop cold.

In several brews I have nevertheless found yeast on top of my hops in the dry hop keg after the second cold crash.
The idea of soft crashing is to dump the yeast and avoid that oils from the hops binding to the yeast. So I would like to avoid yeast in the dry hop keg.

Do you have similar observations with yeast in the dry hop keg? And would a more intense cold crash before dry hopping be the solution?
 

faithie999

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from the "interviewing the beertender" file:

last summer I was in a newly-opened brewery in northern New England. the wife of the owner was pouring the beers. a family came in, and after a minute I recognized the man as the founder/owner of a very large brewery in Delaware. the owner's wife didn't recognize him. he went to the bar and during a cordial chat asked her several questions about the beers on tap. she "passed his test" and he ordered beers for his family. after they left, I told the owner's wife who she had just waited on and she started shaking because she was so nervous to have talked to someone that famous in the industry!
 

stickyfinger

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Another option if you want to mess with it is to get a yeast starter going and then add that to a larger amount of wort, like 1 gallon. Once that is going strong, pitch it into the stalled beer and it should ferment it out (if you can't get a dry pitch of yeast to start up fermentation again.)


Not sure either. Once I added the second pack it was flying within a few hours. Maybe a bad pack or something, The beer finished out at 1,016 too.

Added a half pack of US-05 last night and didn't see any signs of fermentation so resigned myself to the beer being a bust. Took a hydrometer sample and it's actually down to 1.022. Delighted to be honest. Really didn't think it was working. Hopefully with a bit of luck I might a few more points out of it. Thanks so much for all your help yesterday.
 

stickyfinger

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I think it would take several weeks to remove all of the yeast. I find that 1 week at near freezing before the dry hop will remove most of it and works great for making super hazy, long-lasting IPAs. Even after 1 week at freezing a beer won't be clear. If I make a low-hopped beer and let it sit at freezing it would probably take at least 1 month for all of the yeast to drop out.

I usually do cold crash both before and after dry hopping. And transfer the beer to a separate dry hop keg. And dry hop cold.

In several brews I have nevertheless found yeast on top of my hops in the dry hop keg after the second cold crash.
The idea of soft crashing is to dump the yeast and avoid that oils from the hops binding to the yeast. So I would like to avoid yeast in the dry hop keg.

Do you have similar observations with yeast in the dry hop keg? And would a more intense cold crash before dry hopping be the solution?
 

HopsAreGood

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I usually do cold crash both before and after dry hopping. And transfer the beer to a separate dry hop keg. And dry hop cold.

In several brews I have nevertheless found yeast on top of my hops in the dry hop keg after the second cold crash.
The idea of soft crashing is to dump the yeast and avoid that oils from the hops binding to the yeast. So I would like to avoid yeast in the dry hop keg.

Do you have similar observations with yeast in the dry hop keg? And would a more intense cold crash before dry hopping be the solution?
I mentioned the idea a few weeks ago of using gelatin/bio fine or something similar prior to the DryHop as a way to remove all yeast. I haven’t tried it yet but it’s definitely an idea worth considering if that is your goal.
 

Frieds

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A friend of my swears by it and her got me to use it. He doesn't brew anything above 1.065 so he can't understand how I'm having issues. LA3 is a disaster for double ipas, I've 3 brews to prove it.
I read something earlier today where someone from White Labs was recommending to aerate high gravity wort before yeast pitch and then aerate again 12-18 hours after yeast pitch. I too have attenuation struggles with LAIII but I’m brewing a Triple IPA this weekend and I’m thinking of employing this technique to see if it helps with attenuation.
 

Dgallo

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I read something earlier today where someone from White Labs was recommending to aerate high gravity wort before yeast pitch and then aerate again 12-18 hours after yeast pitch. I too have attenuation struggles with LAIII but I’m brewing a Triple IPA this weekend and I’m thinking of employing this technique to see if it helps with attenuation.
The issues with LAIII Is it’s lower attentiatuon. You can compensate for this with a lower mash temp. Since you know it has lower attenuation, the lower mash temp will in increase the fermentabilty a bit but still leave enough non fermentables around for body and perceived sweetness.

another option you have is to co pitch. Pitch LAIII first and then 24-36 hours later pitch US05 or another good attenuator. The theory behind this is that ester are at their peak production in the growth phase which is the initial 2 days, so you’ll get the ester production of the LAIII and the greater attenuation of us05.
 

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has anyone had any commercial beers or some other experience with this cryo blend from YCH? seems pretty neat. They just announced the formal name, and it popped up in the CBB email. It was a numbered blend previously so perhaps someone got their hands on it?

 

aaronm13

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I read something earlier today where someone from White Labs was recommending to aerate high gravity wort before yeast pitch and then aerate again 12-18 hours after yeast pitch. I too have attenuation struggles with LAIII but I’m brewing a Triple IPA this weekend and I’m thinking of employing this technique to see if it helps with attenuation.
I've done the second blast of oxygen when brewing Imperial Stouts and Quads but never on anything around 7-8%, seems a bit overkill. You are a brave man brewing a TIPA with that strain, from my experience recently of using it, you will struggle for that to finish. I'd take Dgallo's advice and co pitch with a better attenuator. My beer is still working away slowly since I added the US-05. I'll never use LAIII again for anything over a 6-6.5% beer.
 

ihavenonickname

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My latest batch was with Verdant IPA dry yeast and it OVER attenuated like a mofo.

Direct pitch two packs of dry yeast into 23L of 1.064 -> 1.006 ! For 7.8%

I’m actually ticked, I tried mashing high because I wanted an especially higher FG (maybe 1.018) than what I’ve been getting lately. So I did a single infusion mash at 156. Left the heat and temp control but no recirculation on my grain father. Stirred for the first twenty but then life happened and I left it alone for 2.5 hours (edit: ridiculous I know, but I’m trying out breaking up the brew day with a new baby). When I came back to it and stirred it was at 149. I didn’t think that would be too bad , but dang it made some attenuative wort. So back to basics for me, dont screw up your mash.

So it seems to me verdant/LA3 is capable of a range of attenuations.

Any tips for salvaging this beer? It’s really dry and bitter as expected, but great aroma!
 
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BeerFst

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My latest batch was with Verdant IPA dry yeast and it OVER attenuated like a mofo.

Direct pitch two packs of dry yeast into 23L of 1.064 -> 1.006 ! For 7.8%

I’m actually ticked, I tried mashing high because I wanted an especially higher FG (maybe 1.018) than what I’ve been getting lately. So I did a single infusion mash at 156. Left the heat and temp control but no recirculation on my grain father. Stirred for the first twenty but then life happened and I left it alone for 2.5 hours. When I came back to it and stirred it was at 149. I didn’t think that would be too bad, but dang it made some attenuative wort. So back to basics for me, dont screw up your mash.

So it seems to me verdant/LA3 is capable of a range of attenuations.

Any tips for salvaging this beer? It’s really dry and bitter as expected, but great aroma!
Mashing is time and temp.
Short of mashing so hot you start denaturing enzymes. 2.5 hours at most mash temps will result in nearly complete conversion and attenuation like that.

you can also go hot and short, 45 minutes to keep the fg high. That’s particular useful for low abv beers that you don’t want dry or to limit their abv
 

HopsAreGood

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Mashing is time and temp.
Short of mashing so hot you start denaturing enzymes. 2.5 hours at most mash temps will result in nearly complete conversion and attenuation like that.

you can also go hot and short, 45 minutes to keep the fg high. That’s particular useful for low abv beers that you don’t want dry or to limit their abv
Agreed. 2.5 hours is a longgggg mash. It’s obviously not ideal but you could try mixing in some maltodextrin or some lactose.
 
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Frieds

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I've done the second blast of oxygen when brewing Imperial Stouts and Quads but never on anything around 7-8%, seems a bit overkill. You are a brave man brewing a TIPA with that strain, from my experience recently of using it, you will struggle for that to finish. I'd take Dgallo's advice and co pitch with a better attenuator. My beer is still working away slowly since I added the US-05. I'll never use LAIII again for anything over a 6-6.5% beer.
I almost exclusively brew DIPA using LA3. I’ve been designing my recipes so that I can account for the beer to attunuate 2-3 gravity points lower than expected. I also mash pretty low (63-64C).

We recently had a distributor bring Other Half beers to Australia and I managed to navigate their overloaded website through several server crashes and secure myself a couple of cans of Tripe Citra Daydream. It was comfortably the best beer I’ve ever had in my life so I am looking to brew something like it, although full well knowing that it won’t be as good. Through what I’ve learned on this thread and scouring for tidbits on the Other Half Daydream thread, as well as my experience using LA3, I’m comfortable with brewing a TIPA and accept that failure is a possibility.

I’m planning on aerating before yeast pitch and 12-18 hours post pitch, using more yeast nutrient, obviously pitching more yeast cells and also staggering my dextrose additions during fermentation instead of in the boil. I’ve planned the recipe in Brewfather to finish around 4 points lower than what I expect it will finish irl to account for LA3’s lower attenuation.

I’m actually really excited about this beer and can’t wait to brew it.
 

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