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No Chill BIAB

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Raider

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Hey Everyone,
I’m planning first 5 gallon BIAB and I’m curious about the no-chill method... is the reason we chill it is to bring it to yeast pitching temp fast or within the brew day? I’m curious because it would probably benifit me to wait till it cools down natural over 24 hours. Is there any harm in doing this? I was just planning on securing the lid and putting it in a cool place till it reaches pitching temp.
I know there is probably a thread on this already and I have seen a bunch of them but still feel like I’m missing somthing so figured I would ask a few direct questions since I’m planning a brew in the next day or 2 and don’t wanna mess it up!
 

derekp83

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Two reasons that conventional wisdom says to chill fast: to mitigate bacteria infections in your brew and to stimulate cold break for clarity.

I enjoy no or slow chill. I've done what you suggested and the beer tastes great. I prefer to let mine cool in the primary though, just for convenience the next day, there's less to sanitize.

Try what you are suggesting and see what you think. Don't let the naysayers scare you away from the method.
 

RM-MN

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If your recipe calls for late addition hops they will continue to isomerize and increase bitterness until the temperature falls below 170 at the same time that the high temperature will be driving off the aromatic oils. No chill works great for recipes that only have bittering hops.
 

derekp83

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True, but there are timing adjustments that can counter that, especially if the brewer does late addition extract and whirlpools, which will at least help the wort cool close to 170. In the case of BIAB, the action of whirlpooling alone will have to suffice.

My advice, add finishing hops at flameout. Stir to create a whirlpool for a few minutes and let it continue to cool for 10 minutes. If you want flavor hops, add with 10 minutes left in the boil. This all assumes you get your beer down to 170 or below in about 20 minutes before you put the lid on and call it a night. Which then sometimes begs the question of why no chill at all when a tupperware size block of ice tossed into the wort itself can, with cold tap water, get the beer down to pitching temp relatively fast. In the case of full boil BIAB, look up no chill hop schedules, whirlpool and lid on.
 
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Depending on what you use for primary fermentation, and what fits in your sink, you can transfer to fermenter at <140(f) and then put a cool wet towel on the fermenter overnight (I can't remember what that's called .. towel in cold water wicking up and over fermenter).
 

BandonBrewingCo

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I kinda no chill. With a shitty immersion chiller I get to 40C pretty quickly and then drag the bucket outside until it gets to pitching temp. I normally get to pitch before hitting the sack. I've never had an issue.
 

Andrew7447

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I've done it, been ok. Think I got a infection one time letting it cool in a non airtight kettle tho.
 

cgriffith

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I do a BIAB [No | Slow Chill] FIAK process. This means at flame out, I seal up my kettle to become my fermenter. I now use a HEPA air filter in rubber stopper on kettle lid that will eventually hold the airlock until the temp is pitchable. Usually, I cool in kitchen sink which takes about 4 hours, but on a few occasions I have just let it sit out to cool till next day. In Florida heat though wort was still too hot to pitch the next day so I still ended up cooling off in kitchen sink. As far as I can tell this process has not hindered the taste or clarity of my brew.
 

BQ&W

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I was going to try FIAK no/slow chill. Please explain the HEPA filter setup a little more- (how/why). Thanks!
 

cgriffith

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Sure.

How:
I have two univessels I use. One is a modified 6gal SS pot. I drilled a hole in lid to hold a rubber stopper. That stopper can hold either an airlock or that attached HEPA filter. I also have a Chapman 7gal. That has a much bigger (#10) stopper, but works the same way.

Why:
At flame out, the wort is at around 210 degrees F. As the wort cools, with the sealed lid, a vacuum is formed. So I use the inline HEPA filter in same port that will eventually hold the airlock to allow filtered air in while cooling; yet keeping airborne critters out.
 

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Brian66

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This is great! I spent a couple of hours yesterday trying to cool my wort in an ice bath - I was short on ice so it took a long time. Will definitely try this filter and pitch the next day.

Question - I've never really cold crashed before because of the vacuum that would suck in the air lock and possibly contaminate. Can this filter also be used when cold crashing and not contaminate?
 

cgriffith

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Physically it would work but... I have never cold crashing due to refridge space, but always wondered how to deal with vacuum issue. More specifically, I would think it would be a bad idea to have air introduced into fermentation chamber after fermentation due to oxygenation. Sure the filter would filter the air, but what about the oxygen. During bottling, I replace airlock again with this filter in order to eliminate the vacuum during bottling, which exposes the beer to oxygen, but that is only for the time it takes to bottle.
 

odie

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You want to do some chilling in order to lock in the late hop "profiles" or any other ingredients added at the very end.

I use an IC but can only get the wort down to around 110-120 (south Texas) without using way too much water. I cover the kettle and let is sit a couple hours or overnight.

Never had any problems before letting a warm kettle sit overnight. But this last time I think an infection took hold. And that kettle was covered.

Nothing is guaranteed...
 

LittleRiver

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...I use an IC but can only get the wort down to around 110-120 (south Texas) without using way too much water....
Check into setting up a recirculating system for your IC.

What I do is use a water transfer pump to first recirculate from a 5gal bucket of tap water. The water gets hot enough to be saved as my wash water for cleanup. Then I move the hoses over to a cooler that has another 5gal of water, plus a 20lb bag of ice ($2 at a local discount grocery). With the ice water I can always count on quickly getting down to pitching temp. I use the water in the cooler as rinse water for clean up, so overall it's a very efficient system.

IMG_20180720_072709_760.jpg
 
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