NEW British all-in-one Brewing Tech coming to the USA - Pinter

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Riaz_PinterUK

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Hello all, my name is Riaz and I work for a British company called Pinter (Pint-er). I'm here to tell you all about Pinter as we are looking to bring it to the USA, starting with our Kickstarter which we've just launched.


What is a Pinter?

Pinter is an all-in-one machine which undergoes pressure fermentation, conditioning and carbonation, and tapping all from the same vessel. It’s straightforward and very quick to use - just add one of our Pinter Packs (brewing wort), water, let it ferment and condition and then tap straight from the Pinter.

You can have Fresh Beer in a matter of days with minimal effort that's consistently fresher than anything and anywhere else.

Pinter also allows you to brew commercial beers at home as we partner with more breweries.

Check out our Kickstarter page to be one of the first to get involved stateside and see Pinter in action.

We would be grateful for any support or advice on where to share this. Feel free to ask any questions!

In the meantime, here's one for you: what US beer would you most like to brew yourself at home?

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This sounds interesting depending on the price. This seems targeted to the novice brewer. Since you are advising here I would like to see you make a case for why a more experienced brewing could use this.

How well does this work with fresh wort instead of the hopped malt extract the kit comes with? I assume a BIAB batch would have more trub that might not get removed before conditioning.

Why does it only promise fresh for one month? Is this just because the beer will become flat as you pour and CO2 comes out of suspension to fill the headspace, or is it the trub left in the serving vessel?
 
As has already been said, I think this will appeal only to novice brewers or those with a passing interest. I don't think anyone on this forum is in your target market.

I'd be very interested if you sent some sample units to prominent Youtube brewing channels so we can see how they work from start to finish.

But dang, that plastic seam along the top left really makes it look pretty cheap on a countertop. Hopefully, that's smoothed out or better hidden in later versions.
 
This will appeal to beginner brewers who have no idea what they need. Once they figure out what they need, they will realize this ain't it. I think this is the wrong place to advertise it. I mean, I'm not saying the kickstarter won't be successful because people get psyched up about all kinds of useless tech, but they probably won't be made up of users of this forum.

The Time Magazine doesn't really help the case. They start out being generally clueless and condescending to the entire homebrewing hobby.
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Just a few comments based on the video on your kickstarter page.

The environmental claim to replace aluminum cans isn't up to snuff as the cardboard/plastic bag/hop container packaging for the ingredients produces just as much or more waste that may not even be recyclable (plastics).

Your revenue streams - the unit itself - the ingredient kits - will be in competition with the likes of Coopers and Mr. Beer who are generally partnered with Amazon. Your ingredients kits will need to be available in the States and be "fresh". Do you have a hopped LME provider in the States or is it all made and packaged in the UK and shipped to the States?

The carbonation seems over the top on the first pours in the video though you claim the valve you've developed evens it out?

How much space does this take in a fridge?

Where are the ingredient packs available and at what cost?

How do you clean the unit?

Coopers and Mr. Beer extracts are mediocre at best - even when fresh, when compared to all grain, how is your extract guaranteed fresh?

12 ingredient packs come with some of the backer levels but how long will that extract remain fresh if you're making one ingredient pack a month and then drinking one ingredient pack a month? Or do you need two or more units to keep up with demand (one or more to ferment, one to drink from)?

To an experienced brewer the marketing is not very believable. "Fresh beer in a matter of days"... how many days and what kind of yeast are you distributing with the ingredient packs? Most beer takes a couple weeks to ferment and a couple weeks to "settle down" how are you speeding up that process?

This might appeal to someone who otherwise would purchase a Mr. Beer or Coopers kit and believes they're getting more by spending more.

Having said that I'd like to see a review of one being used in real time by an independent party.
 
Using my ability to operate a search engine I have found this PINTER beer system

The consensus is what you would expect.

If I come across this for around $20 I might give it a try since I like occasionally doing small batches, although bottles work really well and are sometimes free with the purchase of beer.

Edited.
 
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Hello all!

Wow lots of questions here! Bear with me whilst I go through the backlog and thanks for all of your comments 👍 I'll go through some of the more commonly asked ones initially!
 
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You can check out our own Community Forum for some feedback on the Pinter 3 - Here is a generic topic where people share what they're drinking and this is a topic where people share their overall thoughts and reviews of the Pinter 3. Feel free to research elsewhere of course.

The one you've linked above will be referring to our older models, @Somesaymybeerisdrinkable based on the dates.
 
This sounds interesting depending on the price. This seems targeted to the novice brewer. Since you are advising here I would like to see you make a case for why a more experienced brewing could use this.

How well does this work with fresh wort instead of the hopped malt extract the kit comes with? I assume a BIAB batch would have more trub that might not get removed before conditioning.

Why does it only promise fresh for one month? Is this just because the beer will become flat as you pour and CO2 comes out of suspension to fill the headspace, or is it the trub left in the serving vessel?
That's a fair point, yep! One of the great things about Pinter is that it's accessible to all and allows for everything to take place in one pressurised vessel - you can produce award winning beers without prior experience through simply using our Pinter Packs.

There are a lot of experienced homebrewers who have a Pinter alongside their larger brewing systems largely for the ease of use of the system and simplicity with regards to cleaning and the setup since it produces great final results. For me personally, prior to my job here at Pinter I was brewing professionally for 5 years and I really enjoy using my Pinter. Full-scale homebrewing does appeal to me in theory, however I don't really have the space and/or time for it - Pinter solves that for me straightaway and I've always been happy with the end result - the tapping experience is a big part of that. Pressure fermentation is also quite unique and I've found it interesting delving further into how this works.

The way the Pinter works is that trub falls into the Brewing Dock which gets disconnected prior to conditioning. Of course, depending on the style of beer, quality of the wort etc there will be some variance with self-brewed wort and how much is leftover. This is why we recommend using our Pinter Packs in a Pinter.

With regards to being fresh for a month, this is just a guide really. The carbonation will remain constant since it's pressurised and there won't be any dissolved oxygen inside the Pinter, so technically there won't be any degradation besides simply typical flavour dropping over time. Like with any beer, the sooner the better right?
 
I'd be very interested if you sent some sample units to prominent Youtube brewing channels so we can see how they work from start to finish.
Nice idea. We're in touch with a few influencers and this youtuber - https://www.youtube.com/c/DointheMost . Hopefully we'll get one out to them in time for the Kickstarter.

I know this isn't quite what you're after, but here are a couple of Instagram influencers who gave us a review prior to our Pinter 3 launch -
 
Thanks for the comments and questions so far. As I said above, it's a fair point you've made that Pinter is perhaps more appealing to people getting into making their own beer at home compared to experts.

With that in mind, do any of you have suggestions for other forums etc for us to promote our Kickstarter? Our market is a bit in the middle of craft beer fans and homebrewers. Naturally we've looked in various craft beer channels but often promotions aren't allowed.
 
Just a few comments based on the video on your kickstarter page.

The environmental claim to replace aluminum cans isn't up to snuff as the cardboard/plastic bag/hop container packaging for the ingredients produces just as much or more waste that may not even be recyclable (plastics).

Your revenue streams - the unit itself - the ingredient kits - will be in competition with the likes of Coopers and Mr. Beer who are generally partnered with Amazon. Your ingredients kits will need to be available in the States and be "fresh". Do you have a hopped LME provider in the States or is it all made and packaged in the UK and shipped to the States?

The carbonation seems over the top on the first pours in the video though you claim the valve you've developed evens it out?

How much space does this take in a fridge?

Where are the ingredient packs available and at what cost?

How do you clean the unit?

Coopers and Mr. Beer extracts are mediocre at best - even when fresh, when compared to all grain, how is your extract guaranteed fresh?

12 ingredient packs come with some of the backer levels but how long will that extract remain fresh if you're making one ingredient pack a month and then drinking one ingredient pack a month? Or do you need two or more units to keep up with demand (one or more to ferment, one to drink from)?

To an experienced brewer the marketing is not very believable. "Fresh beer in a matter of days"... how many days and what kind of yeast are you distributing with the ingredient packs? Most beer takes a couple weeks to ferment and a couple weeks to "settle down" how are you speeding up that process?

This might appeal to someone who otherwise would purchase a Mr. Beer or Coopers kit and believes they're getting more by spending more.

Having said that I'd like to see a review of one being used in real time by an independent party.
Sorry for the slow reply @huckdavidson . Below are answers to your questions.

Environmental: Of course Pinters come with their own environmental cost - it's the same as buying anything really, however business decisions are always made bearing in mind eco-friendly options. More smaller packaging is more wasteful than fewer for larger quantities as we do here - you could make a similar argument for other homebrew setups.

In terms of a LME provider, for the initial Kickstarter we'll be shipping from the UK but once we've fully launched in the US we will have a US supplier.

RE carbonation: you can tap as you'd like. Traditional e.g. pub taps are more of an on and off/open or closed, however with this you can control the flow as you'd like. So long as you condition properly, you can pour a perfect pint for you at the start no problem, with more or less head as preferred.

Below are the dimensions.

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Ingredient packs are bought from our website. The US price hasn't been confirmed yet but we expect around $25 per Pinter Pack depending on the style.

You clean the unit by using typical home detergent and then using the purifier which comes in a Pinter Pack.

I haven't used Mr Beer or Cooper's etc but I understand the concern. There's not much to it besides us paying more for fresher ingredients going into our Pinter packs than competitors. A great part of the freshness of brewing with a Pinter is that there will always be a DO of zero, whereas as it common with other units you would need to bottle/transfer to a separate keg or similar.

With regard to the 12 Pinter Pack backing, the frequency is unconfirmed but we won't send 12 out all at once, but will send a number out every few months instead. Different pledges offer one or two Pinters depending on how often you'd like to brew.

RE "in a matter of days" - it depends on the style of course. Hard ciders can be done very quickly, often in a week, ales with typical ale yeast are more likely to be around 2 weeks if you go through our developing times, lagers 3. With all of these you're welcome to condition for longer of course. The yeast we send is always ADY.

Thanks for your comments and questions 👍 Getting further independent reviews from US brewers is definitely a good idea.
 
Thanks for the comments and questions so far. As I said above, it's a fair point you've made that Pinter is perhaps more appealing to people getting into making their own beer at home compared to experts.

With that in mind, do any of you have suggestions for other forums etc for us to promote our Kickstarter? Our market is a bit in the middle of craft beer fans and homebrewers. Naturally we've looked in various craft beer channels but often promotions aren't allowed.
I still think you should try and appeal to more experienced homebrewers. I know a big part of your business model is selling recipe kits, but as your customers start having questions about brewing they will likely find their way here.

There are plenty of brewers on this form that would try the fermenter/serving cask, but there is very little interest in hopped malt extract here.

Not sure if there is a better form for you.
 
I don't know why many answers expect most readers of this forum is 100% dedicated all grain homebrewers. The active members probably are, but I'm sure the majority of the people checking the forum are novices, or have no interest in becoming a fully fledged brewer, but only want to make beer the easiest way possible. If this product is the answer for those, then great.
 
As Shmurf points out there is a market for products like this . Just look at the excitement over on the prehopped no boil kit thread ...some people want easy even if the beer is subpar and costs more they can say they made it.
My suggestion for the OP is to use the inkbird marketing model and get some of these in forum members hands to evaluate.
Let the product speak for itself.
 
I don't know why many answers expect most readers of this forum is 100% dedicated all grain homebrewers. The active members probably are, but I'm sure the majority of the people checking the forum are novices, or have no interest in becoming a fully fledged brewer, but only want to make beer the easiest way possible. If this product is the answer for those, then great.
No one said the forum was 100% all grain brewers. It's just optimism that the majority of people are looking to elevate the hobby, not bury it under the basement slab.
As Shmurf points out there is a market for products like this . Just look at the excitement over on the prehopped no boil kit thread
You mean a dozen people out of tens of thousands of homebrewers?
 
My suggestion for the OP is to use the inkbird marketing model and get some of these in forum members hands to evaluate.
Let the product speak for itself.

+1

Here's one, albeit new, member's take...

Total newbie here but I would love to get more into brewing as a hobby. I have only ever brewed using a Pinter (www.pinter.co.uk). It's pretty simple to be honest. I would like to have more control over the process and brew larger batches (that will hopefully work out cheaper!)

I forsee many new members just like this.
 
Thanks again for your thoughts, all.

My suggestion for the OP is to use the inkbird marketing model and get some of these in forum members hands to evaluate.
We have done this type of thing before in the UK and it's been successful. I'll have a look into how they do it - in the UK we know who to select for things such as this however I can't say I would know who best to choose in this forum having only interacted with people in this one thread.

The Kickstarter has 18 days to go now so it would be a quick turnaround for that, but even still we could do so after it has ended in preparation for the open US launch.
 
You mean a dozen people out of tens of thousands of homebrewers?
Yes ... a dozen ... that bothered to post in a thread on a website . I said there's a market , I am not endorsing the product or their particular business model .
... I think the new member to the forum that DBhomebrew highlighted (unless they are a shill for Pinter 🤔 ) suggests that this could bring new brewers into the fold that want to move on from products like this to the fancy ass stainless homebrew porn sold at places such as BrewHardware.com - High end, practical homebrewing hardware, accessories and ingredients for making beer, wine, mead, and cider. :bigmug:
 
This is a gift! A birthday present, graduation, retirement, you name it. At least in America, it will be enjoyed, maybe used a few times by the person who received the gift, and then most often it will be be put aside for a while due to cleaning efforts, learning curve, wait times, etc. People will go out and buy beer.

However, some people will see the potential in brewing and will advance to their next level. I started out as an extract brewer. This type of unit is a giants leap back from that, but it's still a place to get started. For that reason, I'm in. I won't buy one because, as a brewer, I would buy a real beer-making kit for a gift. THAT'S IF I felt the person was capable of appreciating and managing a full kit and full brewing process. If they were on the younger side, as mentioned, this kit would be an awesome and fun intro unit.

I didn't read any of the claims, but they sounds a little high-brow. Let's be honest, this is not an award-winning beer producing device. Not from the perspective of a homebrewing forum. But it's a fun little thing to culture and propagate some excitement and interest. It might plant a seed in someone to want to become a real brewer.
 
The Pinter Packs are $25. How many beers do you get out of that pack? How much is the Pinter unit itself? If there is no "us pricing" yet, then what are the UK versions going for?
 
The Pinter Packs are $25. How many beers do you get out of that pack? How much is the Pinter unit itself? If there is no "us pricing" yet, then what are the UK versions going for?
Using my ability again to operate a search engine (bing) I have found they sell for £99.00 in the UK. Current exchange rate that's $127.67 which is more than I am willing to pay for a fermenter.
 
Then again I would have never thought that an overpriced coffee urn (BIAB) would become popular as it has.:confused:
BIAB has little to do with "coffee urns."

Nice try...

"All-grain" brewing in an igloo cooler as we know it today is not the traditional standard either.
 
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The Pinter Packs are $25. How many beers do you get out of that pack? How much is the Pinter unit itself? If there is no "us pricing" yet, then what are the UK versions going for?
It says 12 pints all over everything. As this seems to be a UK company, the question is whether thats 12 UK pints (20 oz here) or 12 US pints (16 oz here). There are 8 US pints in a US gallon, so I read 12 pints as 1.5 gallons. So this seems to me to be about a 1.5 gallon system. So $2 a pint plus the cost of the system. I couldn’t tell either if this uses a CO2 gram cartridge for dispense as another consumable.

It looks to me as others have said, like this is just a fermenter and the brew ingredient kits they sell for it are pre-hopped extract kits that are not designed to be boiled. Just mixed with water, shaken well and then fermented in and served from the same vessel.

The part of this I’m intrigued by is the UK beers and recipes part. At least where I live I don’t see much UK beer outside of Boddingtons in nitro cans everywhere and Guinness. Fullers once in a while. And anything outside of that we do see here is usually not in the best condition. I like UK beer and I like that aspect of it. But I’m leery of dump and stir no boil extract kits and three times so for anything using liquid extract - we’ve all had our experiences with old and stale metallic tasting liquid extract.
 
Good luck to the OP. Hopefully the intended market has forgotten about this...

View attachment 825438
Hey I have one of those! Yeah we haven’t used it a whole lot but when we do use it the thing works pretty well for frozen margaritas, it just consumes quite a bit of ice. How about this:

https://bartesian.com/products/cock...MInNKVr6SrgAMVgUlyCh1AJAAmEAAYASAAEgI3KvD_BwE
Consumables really make this unworkable to me. The drink capsules end up costing $2.50-$3 each AND you have to still supply your own booze. Otherwise it looks pretty cool.
 
The Pinter Packs are $25. How many beers do you get out of that pack? How much is the Pinter unit itself? If there is no "us pricing" yet, then what are the UK versions going for?
Hey there, $25 is our estimate and will be confirmed later in the year. As is common with Kickstarters, the better the pledge you choose the better value everything is you receive. It produces 12 US pints or 10 UK ones. For the US launch post Kickstarter, a Pinter will cost $199 and come with glassware and a Pinter Pack.

I couldn’t tell either if this uses a CO2 gram cartridge for dispense as another consumable.
You don't, no. It's a pressurised vessel and uses the natural CO2 produced in fermentation to carbonate the beer and dispense it.
 
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