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Made Simple Invert Sugars. - Jeff Alworth's Method.

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Schlenkerla

Schlenkerla

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Interesting thread ( I'm from Belgium ) . I'm confused, could someone explain the difference between your inverted sugar ( sugar + citric acid + water + heat ) and candi syrup ??

Jacques
Googled this for you.

https://byo.com/article/sweetness-brewing-sugars-how-to-use-them/

Belgian candi sugar is sucrose that has been caramelized to some degree, depending on the color. Dark candi sugar will have more of a caramel taste than the amber variety. Aside from the caramel notes, it will behave exactly like table sugar.

Invert sugar syrups, such as Lyle’s Golden syrup, are made from sucrose that has been hydrolyzed to separate the glucose and fructose. This has two effects: first, it makes the sugar more syrupy and less likely to crystallize. Secondly, it makes it sweeter. Invert sugar syrup is like artificial honey without the characteristic honey flavors. Golden syrup type products tend to be a bit salty tasting due to the acid -base reactions during manufacture. Treacle is partially inverted molasses combined with other syrups. The flavor contributions from treacle can be strong, so it is best to use it in heavier bodied beers like English strong ales, porters, and sweet stout. One half cup per 5-gallon (19-L) batch is a recommended starting point.
 

eimar

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Schlenkeria , thank you for the link. I'll try your recipe for producing the dark version and add it to my belgian dubbel .
 

Northern_Brewer

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Interesting thread ( I'm from Belgium ) . I'm confused, could someone explain the difference between your inverted sugar ( sugar + citric acid + water + heat ) and candi syrup ??
As above - one of the fundamental differences is that invert is made from sugar cane and not beet, because of the off-flavours you get when heating beet sugar. Also invert is inverted (sucrose split into glucose/fructose) whereas candi is just caramelised.

As an aside, one of the Fullers brewers has mentioned on Twitter that Ragus only make #1 and #3 at the moment.
 
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Schlenkerla

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As above - one of the fundamental differences is that invert is made from sugar cane and not beet, because of the off-flavours you get when heating beet sugar. Also invert is inverted (sucrose split into glucose/fructose) whereas candi is just caramelised.

As an aside, one of the Fullers brewers has mentioned on Twitter that Ragus only make #1 and #3 at the moment.
Thanks!
 

eimar

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why is there a difference between cane and beet sugar, after all aren't they both 100% pure industrial refined sucrose ?
 
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Schlenkerla

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why is there a difference between cane and beet sugar, after all they aren't they both 100% pure industrial refined sucrose ?
It's had to do with off flavors from beets vs sugar cane. The beets are not as good the cane. It's the source itself.
 

Northern_Brewer

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why is there a difference between cane and beet sugar, after all aren't they both 100% pure industrial refined sucrose ?
No - they're not using white "100% refined sucrose" as their starting material, it's brown with impurities in it, and the impurities in unrefined beet sugar go "turnipy" when cooked.
 

rhys333

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I made some invert #3 today using this method and while I was researching I came across a commercially made brewers invert that lists the following ingredients on the container: sugar, acid, and baking soda. Interesting. So they must acidify to help inversion, then alkalize at some point with baking soda. I discovered that they do this to assist with caramelization. The following cooking website explains it in relation to honeycomb sugar treats:
How to Make Honeycomb (And the Science Behind Caramelization) - Food Crumbles

Question: has anyone tried this baking soda addition with homemade brewing invert?

I imagine the process would start off the same: heat your sugar solution with acid to 240F. Then once it is inverted, add baking soda and continue the process.
 

Erik the Anglophile

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Ís ok snœrs ok miðnótts boði landi frá komum
Light muscovado sugar #2 made with the oven method.
This is the second attempt, I think I heated too quick with excessive boiling and had too little citric acid the first time, resulting in a hard, crystaline mass rather than syrup. Cooling down now, the foam is from me probably pouring a bit too agressevily. Looking forward to trying this in a british strong/old ale I'm working on.
Will likely do a lighter #2 with refined cane sugar and #3 with demerara.
 

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