Low Oxygen Brewing Reference Sheet

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day_trippr

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I believe that would be three "yes" answers :)

On another note, imagine explaining this to a non-brewer :D

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Cheers!
 

Bilsch

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1. The yeast used for the scavenging method, this is just simple dry bread yeast, correct?
2. The sugar can be Corn Sugar (dextrose?) correct?
3. Campden is Na-Meta. These are OK to just crush up and use for the antioxidants?
This has been answered already but just wanted to add a little more detail.

1) Most are using the instant dry type but all dry bread types work.
2) Corn sugar or dextrose is the preferred sugar.
3) Campden tabs are not pure metabisulfite but also contain fillers and pressing lubricant etc. so you'll have to find out what the percentage active ingredient is and adjust for that.
 

DuncB

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Been reading this thread.
I put NaMeta 0.5g per 25 litres into my mash and sparge water to get rid of the chlorine / chloramine.
Does any for DO need to be in excess of this?

Also have been using it after cleaning keg to sanitise it and fill the keg before emptying it with CO2 and doing a closed transfer.

I'm not really sure how much to use for this phase have been putting 3g in per 20l keg and then pushing it out with CO2 before filling. Apparently the residual is good for scraping up and Oxygen that came out of the water into the keg pre filling.
I'd love a few pointers on this.

Previously I just filled with Starsan solution and forced that out pre keg closed filling.
 

day_trippr

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"With really huge and perfectly round Knoephla!"
Right. I'd then have to explain wth Knoephla are :D
 

madscientist451

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I believe that would be three "yes" answers :)

On another note, imagine explaining this to a non-brewer :D

View attachment 720800

Cheers!
You guys have a lot of balls, thanks for posting! Has anyone with a D/O meter compared boiling with the balls and without? Just wondering how much of a difference it makes and if there's a cheaper/simpler way.
 
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Rob2010SS

Rob2010SS

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You guys have a lot of balls, thanks for posting! Has anyone with a D/O meter compared boiling with the balls and without? Just wondering how much of a difference it makes and if there's a cheaper/simpler way.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but you wouldn't need the balls during the boil, would you? It would only become needed post boil?

Boiling takes the oxygen out of the solution so to me, it seems that during a boil, oxygen would not be able to get absorbed in.
 

Vale71

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You guys have a lot of balls, thanks for posting! Has anyone with a D/O meter compared boiling with the balls and without? Just wondering how much of a difference it makes and if there's a cheaper/simpler way.
If I owned a DO meter I wouldn't want to kill it by exposing it to temperatures outside its working range. In any case if you had DO meter that could withstand those temperatures it would read 0 both with as well as without balls as O2's solubility at boiling temps is null.
 

Vale71

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but you wouldn't need the balls during the boil, would you? It would only become needed post boil?

Boiling takes the oxygen out of the solution so to me, it seems that during a boil, oxygen would not be able to get absorbed in.
You're not wrong. You wouldn't need them post-boil either as at temperatures >90°C hardly any oxygen will go into solution, unless you used an immersion chiller to chill in the kettle of course.
 
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Rob2010SS

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Does anyone have a picture of what the water looks like after using this yeast scavenging method to de-oxygenate? I would imagine the water would be cloudy and have yeast sediment on the bottom of the vessel, no?

Additionally, how important is temperature in this scenario? My brewing water in the basement at room temp is right around the 62F - 65F mark. Will that work for bread yeast or do I need to maintain a temperature as specified by the yeast manufacturer?
 

Bilsch

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Has anyone with a D/O meter compared boiling with the balls and without? Just wondering how much of a difference it makes and if there's a cheaper/simpler way.
As has been already mentioned you don’t use mash caps during the boil. After boiling the idea is to chill quickly as possible so generally floating caps are not used in that situation either. The most popular mashcap is a floating stainless pan. So far there is not enough evidence as to the functionality of the balls because only one person uses these however he seems to like them.
 

Bilsch

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Does anyone have a picture of what the water looks like after using this yeast scavenging method to de-oxygenate? I would imagine the water would be cloudy and have yeast sediment on the bottom of the vessel, no?

Additionally, how important is temperature in this scenario? My brewing water in the basement at room temp is right around the 62F - 65F mark. Will that work for bread yeast or do I need to maintain a temperature as specified by the yeast manufacturer?
It looks exactly like you would imagine, is cloudy and a yeast sediment will accumulate on the bottom. It clears perfectly in the mash.

Temperature regulates the speed of the reaction. Best to keep it between 90-110F if you are looking to get it done in an hour or less. At the low 60’s it could take a day or longer. Usually people who use the overnight method warm the water up to the 90’s, pitch then let it coast down without worry.
 
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Rob2010SS

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It looks exactly like you would imagine, is cloudy and a yeast sediment will accumulate on the bottom. It clears perfectly in the mash.

Temperature regulates the speed of the reaction. Best to keep it between 90-110F if you are looking to get it done in an hour or less. At the low 60’s it could take a day or longer. Usually people who use the overnight method warm the water up to the 90’s, pitch then let it coast down without worry.
I think the answer would be no, but does the yeast scavenging change the starting water profile at all?

Sorry for all the questions but I think this will be it.
 

Bilsch

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Depending on your waters buffering capacity it could lower the pH slightly but that does not usually effect the mash pH very much.
 
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Rob2010SS

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Depending on your waters buffering capacity it could lower the pH slightly but that does not usually effect the mash pH very much.
Yep, was already planning on that. I was reading the info on the low oxygen brewing website and saw that as well.

Thanks Bilsch.
 
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