Just my thought...

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capt82

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Feb 12, 2014
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Location
Fortine, MT
I mostly drink my home brew but when I go out or vacation I like to try the local breweries. This past week in my travels, I haven't got to taste any locals breweries but I found a craft beer store. I was surprised to see mostly cans. I didn't recognize any of the brewers. The store, mostly (about 90%) had these crazy triple IPA's with IBU's of 80+. I bought a couple sours that had no resemblance of beer. There were several flavors named after products like candy bars, kids cereals, and "Fluff". My nephew tried and almost gaged. I threw away more awful tasting $4 canned beer than I have ever thrown away my home brew.

The thing with my story is the owner of the store told me craft beer is a failing industry. I am not surprised one bit after this experience. I found only two craft beers in this store that were just brown ales without all the "fluff". These were the only beers I bought that were drinkable. What's up with this? Is it because so many craft brewers can't compete with the good craft beers so they have to find a gimmick to sell it? I will still go to local breweries but I can't say I can support these crazy, gimmicky? beers. If craft brewers want to compete in the market, work on a good beer, not a gimmick.
 
Is it because so many craft brewers can't compete with the good craft beers so they have to find a gimmick to sell it?
Yes.

There's still plenty of good craft beer in my area. There's also plenty of the gimmicky crap. It's not that hard to avoid the latter.
 
If the store owner says craft beer is a "failing industry," I'd wager his perception is based more on the success (or lack thereof) of his store in moving those products. Maybe changing local preferences has some impact. But the claim that craft is "failing" is a flip comment that probably covers his own business troubles.

Will the market share of craft beer start approaching a saturation point? Perhaps. It's a crowded market, and there has been a thinning of the herd among breweries. But the data doesn't bear out a craft beer decline just yet. While the overall beer market has slid 3% in the last year, craft beer still commands a 13.2% share of the U.S. beer market--in fact, its percentage share went up, despite the overall drop in beer sales. That is not insignificant. Of course, there is competition from other beverages, such as hard seltzer, etc. And there is data showing some young people are foregoing alcohol altogether. But craft beer is still doing well.
 
I agree with Max. I'd say his "reasoning" is an excuse for his poor business decisions and taste choices. Craft beer is still gaining popularity, as many people are more discriminating and always want "more". Stores like Total WIne and Spec's are doing better than ever.
 
"If the store owner says craft beer is a "failing industry," I'd wager his perception is based more on the success (or lack thereof) of his store in moving those products."

"But craft beer is still doing well."
Good to hear. I was also a little worried if beer was becoming water, barley, hops, yeast and Captain Crunch.
 
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