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Instant Dry Yeast into yeast nutrients???

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Hi guys,
So Im making my own yeast nutrients. Someone suggested I add some yeast to a pot of boiling water for 15min to kill it, then dry it and add it into my DAP for yeast nutrients. I wanted to know, do I have to use Distillers yeast then kill it/active yeast. Or can I use the far cheaper Instant Dry Yeast (example: Victoria Instant Dry Yeast pack 500g) which is a lot cheaper than distillers or active yeast sachets as it can be bought in bulk.
 

troxerX

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Hey Jordan, both out of my brewing experience and very few others on this - no need to work hard on this, just pitch the liquid or dry yeast directly into your malt extract boil during your starter prep or (what I do) during the boil of your wort during brewing, remember to always add a good (but controlled) quantity of magnesium via magnesium sulfate during water prep (will let you research why it has to be a controlled amount 😁), and zinc via servomyces if you have available, DAP is also good if you have at hand. An additional technique is adding fungal and micellar extract to your starter, a technique used by Japan’s sake makers to ensure yeast is healthy and strong for sake’s harsh fermentation conditions.

 
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Hey Jordan, both out of my brewing experience and very few others on this - no need to work hard on this, just pitch the liquid or dry yeast directly into your malt extract boil during your starter prep or (what I do) during the boil of your wort during brewing, remember to always add a good (but controlled) quantity of magnesium via magnesium sulfate during water prep (will let you research why it has to be a controlled amount 😁), and zinc via servomyces if you have available, DAP is also good if you have at hand. An additional technique is adding fungal and micellar extract to your starter, a technique used by Japan’s sake makers to ensure yeast is healthy and strong for sake’s harsh fermentation conditions.

Hey, thank you for the advice. I was specifically asking about drying as well because I need to dry it as I am making a large quantity of 10kg of nutrients. I share with friends family, etc and also do different things with fermenting. So judging by what you said INSTANT DRY YEAST will work? I just need to boil it and it will do fine?

also thank you for the other advice will research it
 

troxerX

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Affirmative, for nutrient purposes, I add the yeast (liquid or dry) when I’m boiling my malt extract for a starter or during boiling of the wort when I’m brewing, that will kill the yeast and release all its nutrients. It sounds you prefer the dry version so you could buy the dry yeast in bulk and share it with friends and family. You can add around 20g or more for a 5gal batch or 10g or more to a starter.

If you were to boil dry yeast in water and then dry it and added it to DAP, when you add both together to your batch you may not be adding sufficient dead yeast (assuming equal proportion). That’s why it’s better, IMO, to toss dry yeast directly to the boil(s) as you can add more of it to ensure proper nutrition.
 
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Affirmative, for nutrient purposes, I add the yeast (liquid or dry) when I’m boiling my malt extract for a starter or during boiling of the wort when I’m brewing, that will kill the yeast and release all its nutrients. It sounds you prefer the dry version so you could buy the dry yeast in bulk and share it with friends and family. You can add around 20g or more for a 5gal batch or 10g or more to a starter.

If you were to boil dry yeast in water and then dry it and added it to DAP, when you add both together to your batch you may not be adding sufficient dead yeast (assuming equal proportion). That’s why it’s better, IMO, to toss dry yeast directly to the boil(s) as you can add more of it to ensure proper nutrition.
Ohhhh I see, I thought you only add a few grams of dead yeast 0.5 (dead) for ever 1-1.5 alive. Also I found that apparently 1 gram of magnesium for every 20l of wash is apparently good? Correct me if not please.
 

troxerX

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I like to add plenty of yeast to my starter boils and brewing boils. I also like to add White Labs Servomyces (comes in small capsules) which adds some zinc. Servomyces is also a form of dead yeast supplemented with other nutrients. For magnesium, between 1/2 tsp and 1 tsp of magnesium sulfate (epsom salt) via the mash (or the boil) has worked for me. Too much of it will cause bowel movement so it’s good to calibrate the amount you use. Lots of peered reviewed papers show that magnesium is essential for a high performing yeast. Also, I haven’t used them yet, but I’ve seen online experiments that show commercial nutrients used for wine making have shown promise for healthy beer fermentation as well.

I like to keep a strong game when it comes to yeast supplementation as I use this strategy in lieu of early aeration (or no aeration) of my wort (caution - this is a very touchy subject for some purists in this forum). I ensure my yeast gets sufficient bound oxygen for a healthy fermentation via these nutritional routes instead of aerating my wort manually, which will result in a small (radical) DO anyways, and will end up either oxidizing my malts or just getting out of solution anyways. This is what has worked for me personally so in no way I’m recommending anyone to do this. If you prefer aeration, as I’ve done in the past like everyone else, I have aerated my wort once I see signs of fermentation so that oxygen gets consumed fast and minimize potential for oxidation.
 
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Im in South Africa, however, I am looking for a good yeast for beer (preferably lager and if possible ale if you know), however, im looking for something that is good but keeps a low cost. Lallemand seems amazing but they insanely expensive. Im looking for a company that does cheaper than they do
 

troxerX

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Not sure since I don’t brew lagers, you can try fermentis maybe?, they have good quality dry yeasts available
 
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