House paint that doesn't suck? Home restoration.

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day_trippr

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Ok, so screw exterior trim paint. I have seen the future...and once again it's all about plastics.

I have been busily replacing all kinds of finger jointed pine exterior trim used on our home with cellular PVC and so far I could not be more pleased. As our house had a white trim scheme and the Wolf CPVC line I'm using is bright white I'll never, ever have to scrape, sand and repaint (or replace) trim ever again, which considering how quickly finger jointed pine degrades in the Northeast is an huge win for me wrt maintenance.

I'm using Wolf trim boards (brickstop, 1x6, weatherseal for the garage doors) and with the Cortex plugged screw and driver system. The Cortex kits are tuned to the Wolf brand trim so the color match is dead nuts on - step back six feet and you can't find the plugs.

I've re-trimmed a bunch (5) of patio doors and today I finished re-trimming two garage doors and they look great. I still have another three patio doors and (counts fingers) 11 windows to do - all of it 2" brickstop.

Then I'll be turning my attention towards our deck railing. Two stories, 70-something linear feet of railing and something like 160 balusters per level, all of it pressure treated pine. If I can find a system with post wraps (for the lower level) and sleeves (for the upper level) that match I'm gonna tear everything out and do it over with either composite or PVC (still studying on it).

And once that's done I may consider having the whole house resided with Hardie board (no love here for vinyl siding). Then - theoretically - I won't have to do anything to the outside of the house save for the occasional power wash. I like the sound of that...

Cheers!
 
OP
Still Brewn

Still Brewn

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Plastics are great for a while and i did replace a section of drip edge with one made of pvc I have also seen what happens when the house next door burns or when hail shatters it and when it gets so cold outside you would think hell froze over and it gets hit solidly by something hard. But I have been thinking about replacing all of the drip edge with pvc because it has been the biggest failure point on our house
 
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Still Brewn

Still Brewn

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I finally got to start scraping the exterior of the house with my new scrapers. In all my excitement about how well they work I forgot to take into account one thing..... I still have to be on a ladder 20 feet in the air and apply pressure to the scraper handle. It still sucks to remove paint and there are areas where I am going to have to break out the heat gun. I really don't know how professionals stand on a ladder for hours at a time doing this. And of course it is suppose to rain for the next 2 days.
 

smata67

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I've done my own painting, interior and exterior, for 30 years. I have only used SW products and have had great success. In fact, I use so much, I'm in their system to get the Contractor discount, so I pay 40% less than list. Good paint costs money, there are no bargains. For exterior and interior I have used SW SuperPaint at $60/gal and it has lasted 20 years. I've lately switched to Duration at $80/gal (mainly for trim, my current house is hard coat stucco). Both are 100% acrylic latex paints. SW runs occasional sales, so you could get these at 40% off or pester them and buy alot, they may give you the Contractor discount if you deal with the manager. Hit or miss on quality of personnel in these stores, but some guys are absolutely fantastic, worth their weight in gold if you find one. Go to another store if the people you are dealing with are half-assed, they are out there. SuperPaint is a great product, been around a long time and is good enough. Their exterior latex primer is what I would use over both oil or latex old coats. A-100 alkyd primer, if you are priming bare wood only or exposing bare spots, is a great product, but otherwise, the A-100 is an inferior "Contractor Grade" paint line for house builders and such not concerned with longevity. Stay away from it. For your stucco, I can't help with the paint, but I just resurfaced my house with Acrocrete Acrotex at about $3/SF. The house looks new. I had some deterioration and cracking issues and I could not be more pleased. Been on there for 3 years now and gets hit with some severe conditions in areas. I hired a Contractor for this, an acrylic cementitious base is trowelled onto all surfaces (Acrobase 60) to end up smooth and a fiber mesh is imbedded to span any potential cracking. Once dried, the Acrotex finish is applied with the finish pattern of your choice. This is an all acrylic system, ends up about 1/10" thick on the existing stucco. Fantastic alternative to painting, you can change the color and the swirl pattern, solves issues if you have them. The only problem is finding a good installer, there is a workmanship aspect that makes it a bit trickier than painting. An old house like this, where alot of scraping is needed, is a prime candidate for the new PVA coating restoration systems like Zinnser Peel Stop. You basically scrape off the loose material and brush it on. It can be rolled or sprayed, but the brush gets in there good. It is fairly inexpensive (it is basically watered down glue) and works like gangbusters to hold everything back to the surface. You then prime and paint as usual over it. It is a surface treatment. You will not end up with a smooth surface, but cuts the scraping work by 90%. There are several products out there and they are of varying viscocities, you can do some testing with them to see which one works best on your surface. The Peel Stop is thinner than paint and it gave good results for me, I was painting over oil primed cedar shakes with 4 or 5 coats of deteriorating paint and I would not do that job any different. One last word about working on ladders, determine how long you can work before getting too fatigued, set a timer, and quit when the time is up. Accidents happen when you are fatigued and there is a tendency to keep going beyond ones limitations if you don't do this type of work often.
 
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Still Brewn

Still Brewn

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Sw lost my business because of the sales reps and because I would get paint from them that would clog may machines every time. It was also old enough that it would remain tacky for hours or days after it was applied. When you ar striping parking lots time is the most important thing because you are working on 4 people's schedules.... your customer, their customers, your supplier (which shouldn't be) you your other accounts. They compensated me several times for old paint that had to be repainted but losing $200 an hour per 2 man crew adds up when you can't get to other account. There were also a number of times when I would call my rep and not get a call back for days resulting in 1time losing an account because I couldn't get paint in time, several times having to delay accounts because paint wasn't available and one time I had to stop in the middle of an account because i couldn't get a part in time resulting in a lot that was half painted for more than a week. Clogged machines cost money, chemicals to flush the machine, someone to clean it, someone to filter the paint, disposal of the waste, cost of wasted paint. Every clog was costing me about $100 times that by 4 crews several times a year. After several times we started filtering everything but that was still costing around $50 in wasted paint and man hours, not to mention the filters and accidental spills and disposal. And that doesn't even take into account the number of parking lots I had to restripe because of tacky paint. I kind of did a rough estimate of what it cost me over a 2 year period that I used them and it was enough that I could have cut a month off my schedule both years.
 

kh54s10

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I recently bought a new house. There was a 5 gallon bucket of SW Master Hide interior paint in the garage. I don't know where the Master Hide fits in the SW line up but it is the second WORST paint I have ever used. The worst was Americas Finest that sold for about $10/gallon. Looked it up... $55.09/gallon!!! IMO it is not worth more than $20 a gallon. Behr Premium Plus flat at $25.98 is a lot better. Why pay twice as much for a name?
 

kenmunkholm

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Benjamin Moore Arborcoat solid…

Built a Craftsman/shingle style home in 2000-2003. Every one of the 17,000 cedar shingles was hand painted on all 5 sides, then installed as a rain screen wall on 1x strapping. This was Cloverdale top of the line oil base. Chalked in 4-5 years.

Went with Arborcoat the second time. One coat, water base solid. Still going strong 10ish years later.
Prep was only a light brushing with a scrub brush.

I am certainly a believer in that product.
 
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