Hop schedule for APA with Centennial and Cascade hops?

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ThreeStrandsBrewing

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Hey, now -

I'm brewing up a simple APA this weekend and have my grain bill locked in. However, I'm struggling with my hop schedule. I plan to use 1 oz of leftover centennials, and 1.25 oz of leftover cascades that I have on hand. My goal is for an easy drinking, simple APA. I'd like to get the flavor and aroma of the cascades, and was thinking of pushing them to the end of the boil, something like this:

1oz Centennial 60
.25 oz Cascade 10
.25 oz Cascade 5
.75 oz Cascade. Flameout

Any thoughts or suggestions? I wasn't planning on dry hopping, either. Should I spread both sets of hops more evenly across the boil?

Thank for any insight/suggestion!!

Andy
 

bobbrews

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I would suggest using more hops and implementing a dryhop. However, if this is all you have on hand and want to proceed with 2.25 oz. total hops, then I would restructure the schedule/amounts completely.

You probably don't need a full 1 oz. at 60 minutes. Hit about 30 IBUs after the hot break, and then push the rest of the hops to the last 5 minutes and the hopstand. A hopstand is different than simply tossing them in at flameout and immediately chilling. This will give you more hop flavor/aroma.
 

douglasbarbin

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+1 for more late hops. I have had good results lately doing a small FWH, then adding the bulk of the hops towards the end of the boil and at flameout/whirlpool.
 

smizak

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1oz Centennial ,1oz Cascade - 10 min soak after flameout(hopstand)

1oz Centennial ,1oz Cascade - with the chiller

Those hops are good together.
 

bobbrews

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1oz Centennial ,1oz Cascade - 10 min soak after flameout(hopstand)

1oz Centennial ,1oz Cascade - with the chiller
He doesn't have 4 oz., but more hops would be better.

Still, I would go 30-40 min at a 140-180 F hopstand for better aroma extraction (not directly into the scalding hot 205-212 F wort).

The "chiller" hop addition isn't going to do much if cooling quickly down to pitch temp; that addition would be better suited in the boil to offer some bitterness to counteract the sweetness.
 

smizak

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He doesn't have 4 oz., but more hops would be better.

Still, I would go 30-40 min at a 140-180 F hopstand for better aroma extraction (not directly into the scalding hot 205-212 F wort).

The "chiller" hop addition isn't going to do much if cooling quickly down to pitch temp; that addition would be better suited in the boil to offer some bitterness to counteract the sweetness.
I completely disagree on all points. Do you know what the temp of a commercial whirpool is? Very close to boiling. You also can get a significant IBU contribution in a hopstand and maintain aroma and flavor. Firestone Walker gets most of their IBUs from whirlpool.
 

bobbrews

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Do you know what the temp of a commercial whirpool is? Very close to boiling. You also can get a significant IBU contribution in a hopstand and maintain aroma and flavor. Firestone Walker gets most of their IBUs from whirlpool.
Are you qualified to speak on all time and temperature details for every commercial brewery in America? Nope. Pretty sure the recipe procedures vary from brewery to brewery too, but that is besides the point. This is homebrewing we are speaking of; we are brewing on a completely different scale, and usually with different equipment.

Hop isomerization halts around 180F, so you don't really get additional IBUs if you add them at this point and hold them close to that range for 30-40 minutes or so. This is very popular technique that has exploded during the past decade, especially for APAs/IPAs; I'm shocked you haven't heard of it.
 

1971hemicuda

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Thanks for the tips! Thinking I might have to pick up some more hops! 😬
I mean...having more hops for an APA is almost never a bad things.....

But if you DIDN'T want to pick up more hops they gave a ton of great suggestions. You can probably scale back the 1oz of Centennial at the beginning, drop in .25 centennial at 25 minutes, then hop the #@#% out of it at 10, 5, flame out and whirlpool. Remember, its homebrew! You aren't loosing unless you pour it down the drain!

Other than that, Centennial and Cascades are great hops...enjoy!:mug:
 

smizak

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Are you qualified to speak on all time and temperature details for every commercial brewery in America? Nope. Pretty sure the recipe procedures vary from brewery to brewery too, but that is besides the point. This is homebrewing we are speaking of; we are brewing on a completely different scale, and usually with different equipment.

Hop isomerization halts around 180F, so you don't really get additional IBUs if you add them at this point and hold them close to that range for 30-40 minutes or so. This is very popular technique that has exploded during the past decade, especially for APAs/IPAs; I'm shocked you haven't heard of it.
Ugh.

I have. My experience? Negligible difference from a straight flameout addition. Do I know every brewery? No. Do I know a lot of them? Yes.

Stop the lecturing. HBT talking points don't impress me.
 

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