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Home grown peaches in sour beer

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STMF

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I havef made a kettle sour that I after primary fermentation wants to add home grown peaches too.
Does anyone have any input on:

* How much to use?
* Should I pasteurise them? If so, how?

Regards
Stefan
 

jfolks

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Use 2-4 lb per gallon - just rinse them with water and slice them in half - take out the pits if you’d like (which I probably would in a kettle sour). After a week you can go ahead and keg it (for quick turnaround sours, no need to wait)
 

mashpaddled

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These days fruited sour beers--especially kettle sours--are several pounds per gallon. I just saw this morning somebody on milk the funk posted seven pounds per gallon. If you are targeting the kind of fruited kettle sours you might have bought in the past few years then you probably want at least three pounds per gallon to compete.
 

RPh_Guy

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These days fruited sour beers--especially kettle sours--are several pounds per gallon. I just saw this morning somebody on milk the funk posted seven pounds per gallon. If you are targeting the kind of fruited kettle sours you might have bought in the past few years then you probably want at least three pounds per gallon to compete.
Yeah force carb and don't let it ferment.
 

sweetcell

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2 lbs/gallon is a standard fruiting rate, so increase to 3 if you want a big impact.

i wouldn't worry about sanitizing the fruit. heating the fruit will set the pectin and give the fruit a jammy flavor. yes, there are bugs on the outside of your fruit. but they'll be weakened after freezing (you are going to freeze them first, right?) and they'll be added to a very inhospitable enviro: very low pH and with alcohol present. in summary: low infecting population + massive competition from existing microbiome + rough enviro = low to no risk.
 
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