Has anyone primed with maple syrup?

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Karn

Active Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2021
Messages
42
Reaction score
14
Itching to tap Maple trees and make maple syrup, and more beer. Just seen wine making recipes with maple syrup (liquid gold) and wondering if one can prime beer with maple syrup.
 
OP
K

Karn

Active Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2021
Messages
42
Reaction score
14
Yes you can. I just found out elsewhere in this forum. Thank you Homebrew!
 

cactusgarrett

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
2,017
Reaction score
671
Location
Madison, WI
You can prime with it, and it works. But if you're looking for the syrup flavor, it's not the route to go - I've done it and it's fruitless. I've used syrup in all stages of brewing - in the boil, in the fermenter, at packaging... it always gets fermented out with no flavor transfer. Your best bet to get the maple syrup flavor is to use fenugreek.
 

TwistedGray

El Jefe Brewing Company
Joined
Sep 18, 2015
Messages
7,889
Reaction score
13,502
Location
Monterey Bay, California
Interesting. I once visited an ice cream shop in Ft. Bragg, Ca that had a mushroom ice cream with a distinct maple syrup flavor. Briefly wondered what mushrooms they used since the girl at the counter had no idea.

I may have to try these in a brew sometime.
They are expensive, but they do the job. I find the best time to add is in the bottle (for bottle conditioning).
 

Holden Caulfield

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2020
Messages
226
Reaction score
189
Putting some science behind the fermentability of maple syrup.

"A total of 80 pure maple syrup samples received from primary producers in Canada and the United States were analyzed for their chemical composition, pH and oBrix. The major carbohydrates found in maple syrup (sucrose, glucose and fructose) were determined employing anion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with pulsed amperometric detection. The sucrose content was found to range from 51.7 to 75.6%; glucose and fructose contents ranged from 0.00 to 9.59% and 0.00 to 3.95%, respectively."

Source: The chemical composition of 80 pure maple syrup samples produced in North America.

Glucose, sucrose (disaccharide of glucose and fructose), fructose are all easily fermented by yeast.
 

MadLuke

Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2020
Messages
18
Reaction score
5
Any experience with using lower grade of maple syrup (or your own equivalent)? I have been reading about the grade B and C maple syrup for a while - supposed to have less suger and more "leftovers" - e.g. flavour. Unfortunately I live in a country where syrup grade B is impossible to get, so I cannot test it...

Btw, regarding flavour, back in the days I found myself sitting in one of the Quebec parks and driking some maple ale. No idea what was its name, but it had a lumberjack and some winter background on the label. It did not taste like the maple syrup, but the syrup left really beatiful subtle woody flavour. Loved that beer.
 

odie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2016
Messages
1,357
Reaction score
559
Location
CC, TX
I've done 3 maple RIS so far. Grade A dark as I recall. I think that's the new grade "B". No clue why they changed the grades. But the lower grades are what you want for the most, if any flavor in beer. I guess lower grades are more "robust" and not as palatable on dainty pancakes? Less sugars and more "other" stuff...ie "maple flavor" stuff?

First time 2# was added to the fermenter after 2 weeks and finished out. the maple is subtle but it's there.

Second time was 2# straight to the keg after a month of primary. the maple is subtle but it's there.

Just finished my 3rd RIS. I scaled back the syrup. 1# in the keg with 2 oz maple extract. I guess I'll let you know in a year how it comes out.

I have some fenugreek but never used it before. I opened it and took a sniff but didn't smell anything like maple. Not sure how much to use or if I even should try it.
 

hottpeper13

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2013
Messages
1,077
Reaction score
320
Location
Mequon
It's funny how as the brewer we can't tell the maple is in there,but you tell someone and they go, wow i can taste the maple.......I've learned not to argue but say a little. Had a candi cap barrel aged RIS that blew me away,most maple flavor in any beer I've ever had.
 

odie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2016
Messages
1,357
Reaction score
559
Location
CC, TX
Drew Beechum has suggested just opening the capsules, dissolving in water, and adding right to the fermenter during primary fermentation.
I bought a liquid vial with a dropper. The question is how strong is the concentration of different packaging of fenugreek and how much should be added? Different brands may have different concentrations. Once it's in, you can't get it out.
 

odie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2016
Messages
1,357
Reaction score
559
Location
CC, TX
Only way to tell is small scale dosing and tasting.
that really doesn't work on a 5 gal batch that ages for up to a year before drinking...

I suppose try a drop at a time in my snifter and then hit that nitro tap. point of consumption dosing. extract should blend immediately.
 

cactusgarrett

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
2,017
Reaction score
671
Location
Madison, WI
that really doesn't work on a 5 gal batch that ages for up to a year before drinking
Why can't you pull out a given amount (say 200mL) from your aging vessel? Then you split that and make multiple doses with measured amounts at various concentrations of fenugreek solution. Find a ratio/amount you like, then calculate to scale up.
 

JawnnyO

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
47
Reaction score
7
Any experience with using lower grade of maple syrup (or your own equivalent)? I have been reading about the grade B and C maple syrup for a while - supposed to have less suger and more "leftovers" - e.g. flavour. Unfortunately I live in a country where syrup grade B is impossible to get, so I cannot test it...

In Quebec all commercial maple syrup has the same sugar content 66 brix at 20*C. It is now one of four grades—Golden, Amber, Dark or Very Dark. The grades are decided by two complementary components, colour and flavour, The darker the syrup, the stronger the maple flavour.
In practice lighter syrup is from earlier runs and is best for maple sugar and candy as it is less intense. However most sap here is run through RO up to ~30% sugar content. That greatly reduces time in the evaporateur with heat, so less carmalization means less flavour. It is easier to make so marketed as higher quality. I am a backyard producer with 200 taps.
Mine is less good for making sugar, but great on ice cream. I am currently fermenting my left over final sap that didn't get a full boil. It is taking a long slow time.
 

odie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2016
Messages
1,357
Reaction score
559
Location
CC, TX
Why can't you pull out a given amount (say 200mL) from your aging vessel? Then you split that and make multiple doses with measured amounts at various concentrations of fenugreek solution. Find a ratio/amount you like, then calculate to scale up.
Isn't that basically what i just said? "try a drop in my snifter". that's pretty much a 200ml sample or is my metrics wrong? Once you hit the sweet spot then its just a matter of figuring out how much you have left and how to scale it and inject it without breaking the integrity of the sealed keg or open it and then purge like crazy.
 
Top