Dry hopping temperature

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@RoyalGallon

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What do people think of the idea that the temperature you dry hop at can impart different flavour characteristics to the beer?

Generally my standard dry hop regime is to finish fermentation then cool the beer from around 20C/68F down to 14C/57F and add hops. Leave for 3 days and then crash cool to 4C/39F

Would dry hopping at 20C/68F or 4C/57F give a different flavour?

Do different hops work better at one temperature over another?

If there is a difference? Would a Triple hopped beer hopped at 3 different temps be a thing?
 

ba-brewer

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The temp will have impact on the time to extract compounds from the hop and the actual compounds. I seen an article a few months back that cooler is better for getting the best aromatics. Close to 68 is suppose to speed up the transfer.
When I have put hops in cold keg I get more grassy flavors. I dry hop at 68 in a bag for 4 days without cold crashing. I tried 2 days at 68 and about the same aroma but it lacked flavor.
 

Dgallo

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Temp is showing to have a huge difference in dryhop effectiveness/quality.

More and more research/anecdotal evidence is showing that dryhoping around 48-56*f is having the best outcomes. It’s cool enough to keep ale yeast inactive but still at a temp where extraction of almost all the compounds are achievable. Beers dryhopped cooler will have cleaner, less assertive bitterness(hop burn), and better variety specific profiles than beer fermented in the mid to upper 60s
 
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@RoyalGallon

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The temp will have impact on the time to extract compounds from the hop and the actual compounds. I seen an article a few months back that cooler is better for getting the best aromatics. Close to 68 is suppose to speed up the transfer.
When I have put hops in cold keg I get more grassy flavors. I dry hop at 68 in a bag for 4 days without cold crashing. I tried 2 days at 68 and about the same aroma but it lacked flavor.
I had read about the grassy notes from cold dry hopping before. That’s what made me think about temperature affecting the flavours.

I think an experiment is in order.
 

Dgallo

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I had read about the grassy notes from cold dry hopping before. That’s what made me think about temperature affecting the flavours.

I think an experiment is in order.
 
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@RoyalGallon

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That’s a great read and does seem to suggest that you could play a tune by hopping at different temperatures. Fascinating!
 

ba-brewer

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I do know from past experience that tossing fresh hops into a keg to give a boost that is does not take but a few hours to start noticing the difference.

My earlier comment regarding grassiness normally came after the hops stewed in there a while. It also does/did seem some hops work better cold than other in adding grassiness.
 
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I was having trouble with aroma and flavor from my dry hop, so I started doing what Janish is now recommending based upon what they do at Sapwood. I put the dry hops in the keg, purge it, transfer the beer onto the hops, seal it and put it in the keezer at 36F. After two days, I start giving it gas for carbonation at 30PSI, then dropping it to serving pressure after a day or two. My last IPA was amazing. I am looking to recreating the exact same recipe this week to make sure it wasn't a fluke, but an actual, repeatable process. I have high hopes.
 
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I was having trouble with aroma and flavor from my dry hop, so I started doing what Janish is now recommending based upon what they do at Sapwood. I put the dry hops in the keg, purge it, transfer the beer onto the hops, seal it and put it in the keezer at 36F. After two days, I start giving it gas for carbonation at 30PSI, then dropping it to serving pressure after a day or two. My last IPA was amazing. I am looking to recreating the exact same recipe this week to make sure it wasn't a fluke, but an actual, repeatable process. I have high hopes.
I suppose this means you leave the beer on the hops throughout the time you’re serving.
How long is that generally and do you notice any change or any other flavours coming through with time?
 

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In addition to question above, do you put hops in a bag or loose pellets in keg? I have a clear beer draught system, so it won’t clog a dip stick if using loose pellets?
 
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It can take as long as a month for me to finish a keg, less if I have help from the neighbors taking growlers away. As for flavor, I would say that after 1 week in the keg, it’s good; 2-4 weeks are optimal; then flavors start to drop off.

I put hops in loose, as my experience with bagged hops in a keg created other problems. I use a floating dip tube, so I know the keg is almost tapped when I get hops in a pint, usually only in the very last pint. Once the gas is applied, they start dropping to the bottom of the keg and stay there until the end. In my experience.
 

Spivey24

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I was having trouble with aroma and flavor from my dry hop, so I started doing what Janish is now recommending based upon what they do at Sapwood. I put the dry hops in the keg, purge it, transfer the beer onto the hops, seal it and put it in the keezer at 36F. After two days, I start giving it gas for carbonation at 30PSI, then dropping it to serving pressure after a day or two. My last IPA was amazing. I am looking to recreating the exact same recipe this week to make sure it wasn't a fluke, but an actual, repeatable process. I have high hopes.
I purge the kegs with Starsan, so I don’t understand how I can get the hops in there unless I put them in the Starsan? Maybe that works if its all done quickly.
 

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I purge the kegs with Starsan, so I don’t understand how I can get the hops in there unless I put them in the Starsan? Maybe that works if its all done quickly.
Most people use the CO2 created from fermentation to purge the keg. Put the hops in the keg, close it up, give it a purge or two from your tank if you want to, then run some tubing from your fermenter to the keg, and then some tubing from the keg into a jug of starsan/airlock. The CO2 from the fermentation purges the keg, then once it’s done transfer the beer into the now purged, hop containing keg.
 
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Most people use the CO2 created from fermentation to purge the keg. Put the hops in the keg, close it up, give it a purge or two from your tank if you want to, then run some tubing from your fermenter to the keg, and then some tubing from the keg into a jug of starsan/airlock. The CO2 from the fermentation purges the keg, then once it’s done transfer the beer into the now purged, hop containing keg.
^^this^^
 

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Brewed an English IPA on Saturday that I'll be dry hopping in conical (via CO2 purged hop drop). One fermentation is done (after ~10 days) I plan to drop the temp (about 45F) to harvest the yeast. That's when the hops will go in (post harvest). This will both eliminate the hops getting into the yeast slurry and get the beer to a lower temperature for the hop addition. After 4-5 days I plan to start the carbonation process (drop temp to either 35F or 38F) and let that run it's course. Post carbonation time, I let the beer settle down for a few more days before I do a closed transfer to keg and then can the balance. This process has worked really well since I started doing it with my conicals.

Total time from when the hops go in, until the finished beer comes out is about 8-10 days. All at the cooler temperature. As I brew the recipe more times I'll adjust the hop schedule/time to get optimal results.
 

ThreeSheetz

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OK then... THIS will bring out the HATERS...

I make three beers I dry hop. Centennial Blond, Yooper's "Fizzy Yellow Beer" and my own recipe "Lager's Evil Twin".
I dry hop "cold". Actually the last 3 days of my fermentation (approx. 74* F) directly into my fermenter. It's my practice to ferment my beer for 21 days because the yeast are doing other conditioning type things after the bulk of the alcohol is made. BigFloyd helped me understand that part. The reason I dry hop for three days is because of some testing done by Yooper (I think) but I couldn't find that thread. Anyways, the Hop flavor is amazing. When dry hopping is done "cold" the IBUs are not affected. Dry hopping with heat immediately drives off volatiles that "can" add taste. I absolutely LOVE, LOVE the smell of the hop pellet satchels of Centennial Blond recipe in particular when they are first opened. Those really spicy notes will infuse into the beer when dry hopping cold, I guess do to the alcohol acting as a solvent. I don't know the science behind it but WOW. Plus, because the IBUs are not affected you can dry hop with LOTS of Hops to increase those flavors.

Anyways... that's been *my* experience.
 

jbschuyler

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OK then... THIS will bring out the HATERS...

I make three beers I dry hop. Centennial Blond, Yooper's "Fizzy Yellow Beer" and my own recipe "Lager's Evil Twin".
I dry hop "cold". Actually the last 3 days of my fermentation (approx. 74* F) directly into my fermenter.
I understand your timing for dry hopping, but not how 74 degrees is "cold". Can you please clarify? Thanks!
 

Spivey24

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Most people use the CO2 created from fermentation to purge the keg. Put the hops in the keg, close it up, give it a purge or two from your tank if you want to, then run some tubing from your fermenter to the keg, and then some tubing from the keg into a jug of starsan/airlock. The CO2 from the fermentation purges the keg, then once it’s done transfer the beer into the now purged, hop containing keg.
Not to start an off-topic debate, but that’s technically diluting the O2, not purging. Maybe by the time it’s done, it’s diluted enough.

But I do want to try this and want to stick with actual purging. Wonder what one minute of contact with star San will do to the hops. Need to buy a floating dip tube to test too.
 

Vale71

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I understand your timing for dry hopping, but not how 74 degrees is "cold". Can you please clarify? Thanks!
Sounds like he's confusing dry hopping "warm" with flameout additions, which obviously have nothing to do with dry hopping at all.
 

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Sounds like he's confusing dry hopping "warm" with flameout additions, which obviously have nothing to do with dry hopping at all.
AFAIK, dry hopping at the temperatures where yeast survives is considered "cold" or at least "cool". True cold is at serving temperature. Time frames where dry hopping won't give off flavors is shorter at the warmer side of things. It's why you can add dry hops to serving keg, at serving temperatures and NOT have negative flavors after a month or two. Try doing that at room temperatures (or ale fermenting temperatures) and you won't have the same results.
 

HopsAreGood

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Not to start an off-topic debate, but that’s technically diluting the O2, not purging. Maybe by the time it’s done, it’s diluted enough.

But I do want to try this and want to stick with actual purging. Wonder what one minute of contact with star San will do to the hops. Need to buy a floating dip tube to test too.
Here: Post 3....


I like to do 4-5 purges to 30 PSI after closing up the keg, before the fermentation begins. I typically get at least 50 points of fermentation, and have never once noticed any Ill effects of the keg not being “purged enough.”
 

ThreeSheetz

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I understand your timing for dry hopping, but not how 74 degrees is "cold". Can you please clarify? Thanks!
I guess "cold" was not a good description. "Some folks" consider post flame out Hop additions dry hopping and I was trying to differentiate the fermenter dry hop method from the post flame out additions which are done in the brew kettle.
 
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jbschuyler

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I guess "cold" was not a good description. "Some folks" consider post flame out Hop additions dry hopping and I was trying to differentiate the fermenter dry hop method from the post flame out additions which are done in the brew kettle.
So you are dry hopping at 74? I am trying to improve my process after my last batch failed after dryhopping 6 days before cold crash and kegging - could have been stale hops, but maybe also temp (68 degrees) and duration - so I am deep into the research on this.
 

ThreeSheetz

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So you are dry hopping at 74? I am trying to improve my process after my last batch failed after dryhopping 6 days before cold crash and kegging - could have been stale hops, but maybe also temp (68 degrees) and duration - so I am deep into the research on this.
I'm thinking the 6* difference between 68 and 74 wouldn't make much if any difference. My research indicates the exact temperature isn't important as how long the Hops remain in the beer. Also, how much Hops are used matters too. Yooper's tests indicated max flavor at 3 days. Less time and less of the volatile oils were infused and longer time started introducing off flavors.
My 74* dry hop temp is totally based on the yeast I use. The yeast can start producing it's own off flavors above 75*.
 

jbschuyler

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I'm thinking the 6* difference between 68 and 74 wouldn't make much if any difference. My research indicates the exact temperature isn't important as how long the Hops remain in the beer. Also, how much Hops are used matters too. Yooper's tests indicated max flavor at 3 days. Less time and less of the volatile oils were infused and longer time started introducing off flavors.
My 74* dry hop temp is totally based on the yeast I use. The yeast can start producing it's own off flavors above 75*.
Got it - thanks! I am going to try 3 days max next time too. Cheers!
 

Noob_Brewer

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What do people think of the idea that the temperature you dry hop at can impart different flavour characteristics to the beer?

Generally my standard dry hop regime is to finish fermentation then cool the beer from around 20C/68F down to 14C/57F and add hops. Leave for 3 days and then crash cool to 4C/39F

Would dry hopping at 20C/68F or 4C/57F give a different flavour?

Do different hops work better at one temperature over another?

If there is a difference? Would a Triple hopped beer hopped at 3 different temps be a thing?
So, just curious, are you really just wondering about the different hop characteristics the hops may impart at cooler temps or are you just not satisfied with your dry hopping regimen? When I started brewing about a year and half ago, I was soft crashing after fermentation complete to about 57 degrees and then bumping it up to 68 for dry hopping. I liked the flavor and aroma BUT my experience was that from time to time I got hop burn (Galaxy!) and that while the aromas were good initially, they seemed more "fragile" and not as long lasting. So over time and incremental changes, I have settled in on:

1) soft crash to 50 after fermentation is complete and hold it there for about 36 hrs - wait for the yeast to drop out. If you have a clear fermenter you can actually see this happening. This is a big difference from 57 (when I started) to 50 IMO but obviously the ease at which yeast drops out is likely yeast dependent too.

2) after soft crash - I bump it up to ~53 for Dry hopping. I tried 50 before twice now, but for my system it seemed the hops just dropped and didn't stay in suspension very long. Not sure that's key but I just prefer 53 now for my DH additions.

3) Dry hopping - Im doing two DH additions 24 hrs apart and then starting the hard cold crash 24hrs after the second addition. Once at 38 I hold it for about 24 hrs. So from the time I do the first dry hop to kegging is about 4 days on average.

Overall - zero hop burn no matter what hop I use. the beer is VERY drinkable on keg day but I typically let it carb up for about a week and tap it "officially" one week after kegging.

Cheers!
 

TBA

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Here: Post 3....


I like to do 4-5 purges to 30 PSI after closing up the keg, before the fermentation begins. I typically get at least 50 points of fermentation, and have never once noticed any Ill effects of the keg not being “purged enough.”
I can fit my dry hop keg in my chest fermentation chamber. I have a floating dip tube. I have been wanting to try this but have a couple concerns. Since I ferment at 66-68 the dry hops are sitting warm for a couple days, will that hurt them? At first there will be some oxygen in there, will that hurt them? Are Lupomax or Cryo hops any more sensitive to these conditions?
 

HopsAreGood

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I can fit my dry hop keg in my chest fermentation chamber. I have a floating dip tube. I have been wanting to try this but have a couple concerns. Since I ferment at 66-68 the dry hops are sitting warm for a couple days, will that hurt them? At first there will be some oxygen in there, will that hurt them? Are Lupomax or Cryo hops any more sensitive to these conditions?
Previous post...still feel the same way: also, don’t pay attention to the preview. I have no idea why it shows you an excerpt from a different post than the one the link takes you to.

 

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