Quantcast

Copper flavor for copper ale?

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Joined
Oct 29, 2020
Messages
6
Reaction score
3
That subject line is a bit deceptive--I don't actually want the flavor of copper, but I am asking for advice on what grain (or whatever) could add the equivalent of the kind of zing or tang you get when you put a penny in your mouth (as one does). It's kind of hard to explain... I don't want it to taste like a penny, but just to have the same tangy effect on the tongue. And not a big effect, just a hint really. Any suggestions?
 

MMP126

Lotsa Dude's Thumbs On Here...
Joined
Apr 21, 2016
Messages
183
Reaction score
211
Location
NE Ohio
I am not familiar with the taste of a penny, so I am spitballing here...

Lactic souring would be a way to get some tanginess and sourness into your beer. This can be done a few ways.

1. Kettle souring. I would google it to get a rundown on it.
2. Partial souring of a portion of your wort. Take some of your wort, and let it naturally sour, boil it, and add it to your batch. People have done this with Guinness clones, to get that "Guinness Twang"
3. Adding lactic acid to give you that tangy/sour effect. This is more artificial, but may get you to where you need to go.
4. Using acid malt to decrease the pH during your hot side brew day. I know you can do this, but I do not know much about the process. Maybe some others can comment on this.
 

V-Fib

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2016
Messages
251
Reaction score
94
Maybe some lactic acid in a small amount. No idea how much or if the small amount would add the "tangy effect" without adding a sour taste. Acidulated malt could also possibly work but it might have to be added near the end of the mash.
 

V-Fib

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2016
Messages
251
Reaction score
94
If you have the ability to keg you can brew without doing anything about the tang then pour a glass and add 1 drop of lactic at a time till you get the effect without making it to sour. Once you are at the right taste you'll have to do some math to figure out how much for 5 gal.
 

Kickass

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2009
Messages
647
Reaction score
272
Location
Tehachapi
Do you have a beer you’re trying to model this after or did you pop a penny in your mouth one day to arrive at your eureka moment?

Tartness from lactic acid or souring might be what you’re aiming for.
 

K_tile

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2019
Messages
76
Reaction score
43
Copper or metallic taste in beer typically comes from high iron content in water.
 
OP
Murph's Taproom
Joined
Oct 29, 2020
Messages
6
Reaction score
3
Thanks for the suggestions! Maybe adding the lambic would work, but I don't think I've quite explained this how I meant to. I guess I'm not looking for a "tangy" flavor per se but more of a malty bite or sharpness? For instance, the owner of the LHBS suggested I add a little rye, and the recipe already calls for a little bit of roasted barley...

For comparison, a copper ale could simply be a mellow amber, but I'm thinking of something that's mellow at first but then has a kind of "sharp" bite or finish--although sharp isn't quite the word I mean. I wish I could articulate exactly what I mean, but I feel instinctively it should come from the grain bill. I'm just not sure what grain I'm looking for. Does any of that make sense? I'm sure it sounds extremely vague.
 

cmac62

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2017
Messages
1,451
Reaction score
370
Location
Menifee, CA
Murph, I read through this thread, but really didn't have anything to add, but as I kept looking in the New Posts area I found this thread Feedback on English Dark Mild Recipe? and at the end they talk about using the Mexican piloncillo sugar has produced some metallic flavors. Maybe this is what you're looking for. Good luck :mug:
 

TheMadKing

Western Yankee Southerner and Brew Science Nerd
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jun 17, 2015
Messages
3,587
Reaction score
1,583
Location
Gainesville
Look at red crystal malts, they can offer a bit of a metallic taste that I think you're describing. Carared in particular - I've had amber ales with that metallic taste to them and it's definitely from the crystal or roasted malts used for color
 
OP
Murph's Taproom
Joined
Oct 29, 2020
Messages
6
Reaction score
3
Look at red crystal malts, they can offer a bit of a metallic taste that I think you're describing. Carared in particular - I've had amber ales with that metallic taste to them and it's definitely from the crystal or roasted malts used for color
Another great suggestion. I think you put me on the right track. Thanks.
 
Top