Cold Crashing

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Texas_Red

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I have an IPA in the fermenter that I will be kegging at the end of the week. I have not cold crashed in the past but like the idea of having a much clearer beer. I understand just putting my fermenter in the fridge will suck in air and risk oxygen getting in which we all know is bad. I have also read about cold crashing in the keg. So what is the process there? Do I just transfer to keg, purge with CO2, and put in the fridge without pressurizing the keg for a day or 2?
 

Dr_Jeff

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I have an IPA in the fermenter that I will be kegging at the end of the week. I have not cold crashed in the past but like the idea of having a much clearer beer. I understand just putting my fermenter in the fridge will suck in air and risk oxygen getting in which we all know is bad. I have also read about cold crashing in the keg. So what is the process there? Do I just transfer to keg, purge with CO2, and put in the fridge without pressurizing the keg for a day or 2?


Go ahead and hook up the gas, let the carbonation process start.
 

Dr_Jeff

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Seems to me that everyone cold crashes when kegging by just putting the keg in the keezer , but I'm new to home brewing.
Most do.
One ends up with a bit of sediment in the first pour and it is good until the kegs kicks, unless the keg gets moved.

If the beer can be cold crashed in the fermenter, one ends up with less sediment in the keg.

It really depends on what equipment you have and the capabilities of said equipment.
 
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Texas_Red

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OK so I guess just the act of kegging it handles the cold crash. So I will just end up with a little sediment on my first pour. No big deal. Appreciate the replies.
 

spittiz

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To me, cold crashing means cold crashing in the fermenter, if you've kegged the beer I don't know why you wouldn't hook up the CO2 at the same time, and when you do, it's conditioning at that point IMO (not cold crashing), whatever the temp might be.

When cold crashing in the fermenter, you get less particles in your keg = less sediment. But yeah, if you just toss a fermenter with an airlock into a fridge you will have a lot of suck back = oxygen gets in (and possibly some of your airlock solution), so it's not good. The solution is to have a closed fermenter that can handle a little pressure, e.g. a Fermzilla, I use the All-rounder myself. When I want to cold crash, I swap out the airlock to a ball-lock post and CO2 purge the headspace a few times for good measure, leave a slight pressure in the vessel and then do the cold crash, and since the fermenter is air-tight at this point, no oxygen gets in.

If you don't have a pressure-capable fermenter and don't plan on getting one, some people use mylar balloons attached to the airlock during the fermentation, to capture co2. Then when you cold crash, the pressure drop just ends up sucking co2 back from the balloon instead of oxygen. I tried it a couple of times myself, and I suppose it worked all right, but I much prefer to just use a proper fermenter. The balloon method is mentioned here among other places.
 
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