Burton Ale beer question

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Chuginator

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Reading Mosher's "Tasting Beer," and he mentions a Burton Ale as an historic style.

"This darker cousin to IPA was what the Burton brewers were cooking up before the huge phenomenon of IPA hit them. These were rich, deep-amber, even brown-colored beers with a lot of residual sweeetness and often very high original gravities."

He goes on to state that there are a few version brewed commercially, but does not give examples.

Can someone give me a commercial example or two of this style?
 

bierhaus15

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Chances are you won't find any historically accurate commercial examples around. Most people assume Burton is just a darker and hoppier IPA, which as you can see is not so. I might be confusing this with strong ale, but I think winter warmer style beer was an evolution of burton. Got to look that up...

Here are a few recipes for historical 'burton'.

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2010/06/lets-brew-wednesday-fullers-obe.html

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2010/03/lets-brew-wednesday-1928-barclay.html
 

Revvy

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Double Diamond was a traditional Burton Ale that was brewed until 2003 iirc. I actually did some research into Burton ales and brewed one in may https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/i-...ne-natl-homebrew-day-need-help-recipe-243091/

It started out as a DD clone, but during my research on Barclay Perkins I got interested in a "sub class" you might say of Burton Ales that came out after WWII-

Ben Truman is a good example of the type of stronger Pale Ale that many breweries introduced after WW II. It was heavily advertised by Truman in the 1950's and designed to compete with beers like Bass and Double Diamond.
Ballantines was an Amercianized version of the Burton Ale as well. You can read about Bally's here.
 

Revvy

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The closest thing you can easily get today that falls into the Burton style ale category is of course (and I'm surprised noone's mentioned it)



The Bass Brewery was founded as a brewery in 1777 by William Bass in Burton upon Trent, England. The main brand was Bass Pale Ale, which was once the highest selling beer in the UK. The company became one of the main breweries in the UK, and Bass Pale Ale was exported throughout the British Empire, the distinctive red triangle becoming the UK's first registered trademark.
 

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Chances are you won't find any historically accurate commercial examples around. Most people assume Burton is just a darker and hoppier IPA, which as you can see is not so. I might be confusing this with strong ale, but I think winter warmer style beer was an evolution of burton. Got to look that up...

Here are a few recipes for historical 'burton'.

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2010/06/lets-brew-wednesday-fullers-obe.html

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2010/03/lets-brew-wednesday-1928-barclay.html
I'm having issues with searching on the Barclay Perkin's site, BUT there are a ton of great articles on Burton Ales there, including some 'overview' articles. But here is a good one on the topic.
 

bierhaus15

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An interesting side note: Bass used a red diamond symbol for their Burton ales and the red triangle for their pale ales/ipa.

I made a small batch of the 1928 Burton recipe last year and thought it was really good. Wish I had a bottle of it left, I bet it would have aged wonderfully.
 

unionrdr

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I'm going to have to dig into this further,after a PM from a person here of high renown. Especially after brewing many things with cooper's cans & ale yeast,DME,etc. The original "Australian Ale" intrigues me,having brewed an English bitter,it's little cousin. I've started formulating an extract recipe for this one. I will say that it was amber to copper/brown in color.
I'll give it a tad more carbonation than 1.3V max that the EB or "ordinary bitter" gets to style. Too flat-ish for me.
 
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