Best temp to keg carb?

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Turfgrass

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Hi there! Fermentation of my NEIPA is complete and I am going to transfer to keg this afternoon. I'm wondering if I should co2 carb and maintain at basement temps of 59*F or connect co2 and place keg immediately into my keezer? Also BS3 has me maintaining at 65*F for another 1.5 weeks. Wondering I should continue that as well. I could always transfer and carb while maintaining the 65* temp. Thoughts? Thanks in advance.
 

VikeMan

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Fermentation of my NEIPA is complete and I am going to transfer to keg this afternoon. I'm wondering if I should co2 carb and maintain at basement temps of 59*F or connect co2 and place keg immediately into my keezer?
So, it sounds like you're finished with fermentation and whatever dry hopping you were going to do? If so, I can't think of any reason to keep the beer warm while carbonating.

Also BS3 has me maintaining at 65*F for another 1.5 weeks. Wondering I should continue that as well. I could always transfer and carb while maintaining the 65* temp.
¯\_(ツ)_/¯
I guess you could ask the author of the software. Maybe it's some default (or user specified fermentation profile) intended to ensure all the yeast "cleanup" happens. But if you reached FG and if there were no off flavors, and your dry hopping was finished, I would go ahead and keg, particularly with an IPA.
 
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Turfgrass

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So, it sounds like you're finished with fermentation and whatever dry hopping you were going to do? If so, I can't think of any reason to keep the beer warm while carbonating.



¯\_(ツ)_/¯
I guess you could ask the author of the software. Maybe it's some default (or user specified fermentation profile) intended to ensure all the yeast "cleanup" happens. But if you reached FG and if there were no off flavors, and your dry hopping was finished, I would go ahead and keg, particularly with an IPA.
Thank you.
 

DuncB

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Cold crash to let the hops drop out fully then transfer and carb. Unless you are pressure fermenting and you could do both at once. You might get hop creep if you transfer to keg with suspended hop particles, although if cold the yeast will struggle to do much.
 
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Turfgrass

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I kegged it last night will minimal problems from carboy to keg and set to 9psi at 37*F. How long would it take to become fully carbonated?
 

VikeMan

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I kegged it last night will minimal problems from carboy to keg and set to 9psi at 37*F. How long would it take to become fully carbonated?
With "set and forget," probably about 2 weeks. Many will say you can get full carbonation in a week this way, but in general, I think those folks are jumping the gun a little, finding that there's some level of carbonation (of course), and declaring victory.

If you want to carbonate this faster, without much risk of over carbonation, you could set the pressure to 20 PSI for about 48 hours, then reduce back to your 9 PSI for a few days.
 

Bobby_M

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Week 2-3 is where it reaches that chart volume of CO2. Most people put the pressure at 20psi or so for a few days to push that timeline, then back off to the chart.
 
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Turfgrass

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I've had it at 38*F under 8psi for the last 4 days. Should I push it to 20 for a few days then back off?
 

Culinarytracker

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I've had it at 38*F under 8psi for the last 4 days. Should I push it to 20 for a few days then back off?
It's been a few days, so you're probably all set by now.

To answer your question though. I try to never leave high pressure on a keg for more than 2 days. I'll usually do 24 hrs at 30psi, then drop it to final pressure and wait a few days. It's usually good enough to enjoy a few sample pints in the meantime.
 

Golddiggie

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If you want to get the carbonation level without going above serving pressure, look at one of the carbonating keg lids that are out there. I picked one up from MoreBeer not that long ago.
They're easy to use IMO. I did the first batch by using my spare/mobile regulator on a 5# CO2 bottle. I then picked up a secondary regulator and just fed it from the port that wasn't being used. Since I won't be looking to go above the pressure going to that manifold (it's the higher pressure set for my two body regulator) it's no issue for me.
The instructions with the lid call out letting the beer get to serving temp first (34-40F). I usually give the beer 2-4 days to get there. Then feed the carbonating lid 3-4psi. Increase by 2psi per hour until you get to your desired level. Then let it sit at that pressure for at least 24 hours. You can pull a sample at that point to see if it's where you want it. If not, give it another 24 hours. I've been giving it 2-3 days at the final pressure level before doing anything else. Like moving the lid to another keg.
I'm getting ready to order another pair of lids in the next few weeks. Mostly so that I can put them on the kegs when the coming batch (12 gallons going into keg for my English IPA, via two 6 gallon Torpedo kegs) when I transfer from fermenter. Since I also ferment under pressure, I could probably start the feed at a higher PSI than they call out. I'd just need to see what the equivalent PSI level is for when it reaches final temperature in the keezer.
The only thing I didn't like about the lid was the tubing going from the lid to the stone used to infuse the beer is looped back towards the lid. I also needed to shorten that tubing in the first one since I was going to use it with 3 gallon kegs. I simply trimmed from the stone up to the length I wanted. Cut the piece left on the lid to remove it, then use hot water to make the cut piece so that it could go onto that fitting. The tubing still had a bit of a bend, but running hot water over it took care of that. I'm hoping I won't need to trim the new ones, but I will if needed.
 

mattman91

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It's been a few days, so you're probably all set by now.

To answer your question though. I try to never leave high pressure on a keg for more than 2 days. I'll usually do 24 hrs at 30psi, then drop it to final pressure and wait a few days. It's usually good enough to enjoy a few sample pints in the meantime.
This is what I do. I also vent the pressure out before dropping to serving pressure. Is that necessary?
 

deuc224

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No lie, ive read a ton of burst carbing advice and the best ive come acros that is tried and true for me is 24hrs @ 40 psi, then reduce to serving pressure and let sit for 12 and you are good. Its the method i use now AFTER i bought all the equipment to do quick carbing, now I have no desire to even hook it up.
 

cgoldberg3

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No lie, ive read a ton of burst carbing advice and the best ive come acros that is tried and true for me is 24hrs @ 40 psi, then reduce to serving pressure and let sit for 12 and you are good. Its the method i use now AFTER i bought all the equipment to do quick carbing, now I have no desire to even hook it up.
You do your carbing schedule without the quick carbing equipment? Just making sure I understand.
 

deuc224

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You do your carbing schedule without the quick carbing equipment? Just making sure I understand.
Well its not a schedule per-say, if im letting it sit like a pseudo lager, let it relax for 2 weeks at serving psi. But if i need to quick carb a keg to be ready the next day, ill push it to 40 or 42 psi for 24 hrs, then adjust it to serving psi for 12 hours and its ready to drink. I have a pump, tee piece, carb stone, and tubing to put it together but since using the method I described earlier, I havent had the need to assemble it.
 

Culinarytracker

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Well its not a schedule per-say, if im letting it sit like a pseudo lager, let it relax for 2 weeks at serving psi. But if i need to quick carb a keg to be ready the next day, ill push it to 40 or 42 psi for 24 hrs, then adjust it to serving psi for 12 hours and its ready to drink. I have a pump, tee piece, carb stone, and tubing to put it together but since using the method I described earlier, I havent had the need to assemble it.
So would that system recirculate the beer under pressure with the carb stone in the circuit? I've always just seen people do the carb stone dangling in the keg where they increase a couple psi every couple hours.
 

deuc224

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Yeah but then you have to let it sit for a day so you dont have a foam party lol
 
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