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Are dented kegs okay?

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Beenym88

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I got a 4 pack of used 5 gallon kegs. They most certainly are very used looking one has a serious dent in the bottom. Is it okay to use or should I see if I can send it back? I tested it doesn’t leak. One more question another one of the kegs I cannot get the kid to sit right with out it leaking if I flip it upside down but when it arrives it still had pressure. Any suggestions on that one. And I flip it upside down to thoroughly soak with PBW and starsan.
 

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myndflyte

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It's a pretty good dent but if it doesn't look cracked or anything, I would assume it's ok. But if you're worried, you could try to get it replaced. As for the lid, they fully seal by having pressure push them up from the bottom. So put some CO2 in there and it should seal up the lid.
 

apache_brew

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They're fine. As long as the dip tube clears the bottom dent, there's no real worry. Inward dents on kegs can only go outward when pressurized.

Regarding your leaking lid, did you replace all the gaskets with new ones? How's the lip look on the keg itself? I've bought kegs where the lip opening has been bent and I needed to flatten it out with pliers so that the big o-ring would sit flat. Also, sanitary keg lube helps with minor leaks and increases gasket life.

CIP Film Keg Lube - 4 oz. | MoreBeer
 

Vale71

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They're fine. As long as the dip tube clears the bottom dent, there's no real worry. Inward dents on kegs can only go outward when pressurized.
The only issue is when they do so explosively...

Seriously dented kegs could have had their structural integrity compromised and should at the very least undergo hydrostatic testing. In this case it's probably best just to try and have it replaced.
 

apache_brew

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The only issue is when they do so explosively...

Seriously dented kegs could have had their structural integrity compromised and should at the very least undergo hydrostatic testing. In this case it's probably best just to try and have it replaced.
I was referring the one in the picture, didn't intend to make a blanket statement. Also, I hydro test my dented corny kegs every time I fill them with beer by burst carbonating them at 50 psi (4.5X operating pressure) 🤣
 

bleme

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Regarding the one you are having trouble sealing:
1. Always use keg lube
2. When filled, lift by the clamp and wiggle a bit to make sure the gasket seats
3. One of mine has matching dents in the keg and lid so it only seals when the lid is one way
4. Might need to buy one of the oversized, extra squishy O-rings.
 

Snuffy

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On the bright side, you'll always be able to remember what's in the dented keg.
 

grampamark

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The only issue is when they do so explosively...

Seriously dented kegs could have had their structural integrity compromised and should at the very least undergo hydrostatic testing. In this case it's probably best just to try and have it replaced.
I’m not worried. If one of my dented kegs explodes it will probably be seconds before my house gets struck by a meteorite while I’m hiding under my bed during the zombie apocalypse.

Odds are about the same...
 
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Beenym88

Beenym88

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Thanks everyone I was worried that it was similar to your fermenter how that can’t have any scratches or anything.
 

day_trippr

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fwiw, I have had a couple of kegs - with deep hits near the bottom seam like the one shown at the top - for well over a decade ("Thanks, AIH!" ;)) So far so good.

Store empties moderately pressurized to lend a hint that a crease may have finally breached before filling with beer :)

Cheers!
 

GPDitches

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I got a 4 pack of used 5 gallon kegs. They most certainly are very used looking one has a serious dent in the bottom. Is it okay to use or should I see if I can send it back? I tested it doesn’t leak. One more question another one of the kegs I cannot get the kid to sit right with out it leaking if I flip it upside down but when it arrives it still had pressure. Any suggestions on that one. And I flip it upside down to thoroughly soak with PBW and starsan.
It'll be ok. Clean and sanitize. Change out the o-rings, add some water and Starsan, close it up, pressurize and make sure it holds pressure. It may be dented but it's going to be sitting in a Kegerator or keezer anyway, so...
 

JSmetalcraft

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While the OP's dent is large, I took a brass hammer and sort of was able to get a few dents looking better out of two of mine. The dents were further up the side and much easier to deal with. I really didn't care for $25 each.
 

Andre3000

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The only issue is when they do so explosively...

Seriously dented kegs could have had their structural integrity compromised and should at the very least undergo hydrostatic testing. In this case it's probably best just to try and have it replaced.
What dent is "serious"? Bigger than dime sized? Bigger than golf ball sized? Crushed in half?

There is lots of literature out there on dents in pressure vessels. Pipeline literature I've read states that you'd have to have a dent d/D>.25 where d is the dent depth and D is the diameter of the pipe to have an appreciable reduction in maximum allowable working pressure with a ductile material. The dent pictured is nowhere near this limit. And even then, it's nowhere near the maximum pressure rating of these kegs during NORMAL beer serving operations.

So unless your keg is severely dented (like almost crushed in half), you likely don't have to worry about it.
 
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