Does a CO2 Leak Cause a Decrease in Humidity?

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Nagorg

If a frog had wings...
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Hey HBT!

Yes, this is another CO2 leak thread. I've been chasing CO2 leaks after loosing a 10# bottle over a ~3 week time-frame while hooked up to only two 5G kegs. Yes, I isolated that leak to the gas disconnects that just needed a bit more tightening. EDIT: Yes, my CO2 bottle is inside my keezer!

One thing I noticed was a steady decrease in humidity over those few weeks; down from ~80% to the upper 30% range. At the time I thought my EVA Dry 500 was really doing a fantastic job. But after replacing the bottle and fixing the leak, the humidity level stayed in the ~70'ish range and wouldn't drop lower, not even after swapping one EVA500 out for another that was freshly recharged.

Move on to today, I've added 3 more kegs and started carbing these too. All new additions; gas lines, disconnects etc.. I'm once again noticing a decrease in humidity and have started trying to do isolated leak-down tests to rule-out or find a potential leak. (leak-down test is closing off sections of the air distribution, closing the CO2 tank valve and watching for pressure drop over periods of time.)
This is hard since these beers should be absorbing CO2 now and I assume that would result in slow pressure drop.

Now on to my question, has anyone else observed that a CO2 leak would cause a decrease in humidity? Or maybe cause a hygrometer to report things this way? If confirmed, this could be another tool for determining that you have a problem as opposed to buying a somewhat expensive CO2 detector like this one from Inkbird.
 
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I don't test the humidity in my kegerator, and I'm not a scientist or refrigerator tech. But I suspect that the bottled CO2 has zero moisture in it. If the gas was leaking into the fridge it would displace the air and any moisture.
 
I don't test the humidity in my kegerator, and I'm not a scientist or refrigerator tech. But I suspect that the bottled CO2 has zero moisture in it. If the gas was leaking into the fridge it would displace the air and any moisture.

I use one of those indoor/outdoor thermometers that has a wireless transmitter and a separate remote display. The transmitter is inside the keezer and the remote display is hung on the wall next to it. It happens to also measure humidity and that's how I even became aware of this phenomenon.

I say phenomenon but its based purely on chance observation. I cant find any information to support what I observed.

Maybe its just that simple, the leaked CO2 had less moisture than the normal air and the mixing of the gases (I do have a fan circulating air inside) caused a lower humidity. But even with this simple explanation it seems that observing humidity in your kegerator could help you catch when a leak was present.
Maybe... If this could be confirmed somehow.. But I'm not willing to invest in the CO2 needed to stage some tests. :p
 
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