anybody else annoyed with the whole IPA craze?

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masonsjax

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DIPA is an American term, and while triple digit is perhaps an exaggeration for American "IPAs", few of them fall in the IBU range of a true IPA which normally would be under 50, and few are built with the hops that would have been used in a true IPA. They really are ABAs.... American Bitter Ales.

H.W.
Yeah, it's called American IPA, I've never heard the term ABA before. There's certainly no confusion about the differences between the original English style and the modern bastardized American version is there? I've never had an IPA from an American brewery expecting low IBUs and English hop varieties, we all know exactly what to expect.
 

Billy-Klubb

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"Real" IPA has changed, that's all. The same way that Mild has changed. Pale Ale has changed. And English brewers are using new world hops too.

And frankly, historically, since we're playing that card, there isn't really a distinction between Pale Ale and IPA. Whatever the brewer felt like calling it is what the difference was. One day the SAME BEER from the SAME BREWERY would be called Pale Ale, the next day India Pale Ale (ok perhaps not the same day, but you get the point). And one brewery's Pale Ale would be substantially more highly hopped than another brewery's IPA.

And if you look at old recipes for Pale Ale and IPA, the amount of hops they used was insane. Now, I'm sure they hadn't bred up the alpha acids to levels like we see today, but the IBUs are very, very high.

Ron Pattinson. Read his work. Especially before you try to take beer history and throw it all out of context.
Example (from Ron Pattinson's recipe book for homebrewers on vintage English Ale). 1868 Tetley East India Pale Ale. Has an IBU rating of 146.
Oh, Qhrumphf! you and your fancy facts!:pipe:


when I started brewing in '99, you didn't see too many IPAs in Lee's Discount Liquors. there was a lot of stouts, porters, and a growing number of Belgian styles.
 

brewbama

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I prefer a balanced beer myself.

I wonder why IPA wasn't in the British area?
 

1975brewer

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I'm surprised at the complaints that there are too many IPAs, barrel aged beers or any others (I didn't read the whole thread). But if we're going to complain about the large selection available today i may as well chime in.

S!!T I'm never going to live long enough to try all these beers.:mad:
 

campbellmike

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I have a suggestion. If you don't like something don't buy/make it. If you like something buy/make it. As was mentioned earlier, the market dictates and the more you buy/make the more will be available. I personally don't like a lot of trendy things but I don't buy or use them.

For me, make it hoppy or not but make it complex and flavorful. I've learned to try new styles and have been pleasantly surprised. I've even had some adjunct beers that were great that I would have avoided like the plague. Oh, and keep the IPAs coming. I've had several that were disappointing but my absolute favorites are nice, big IPAs.
 
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I have a suggestion. If you don't like something don't buy/make it. If you like something buy/make it. As was mentioned earlier, the market dictates and the more you buy/make the more will be available. I personally don't like a lot of trendy things but I don't buy or use them.

For me, make it hoppy or not but make it complex and flavorful. I've learned to try new styles and have been pleasantly surprised. I've even had some adjunct beers that were great that I would have avoided like the plague. Oh, and keep the IPAs coming. I've had several that were disappointing but my absolute favorites are nice, big IPAs.

Agree!
 

ingchr1

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One down side of too much selection is things sitting on the shelf longer then they should an then being sold.
 

JugKing

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Yeah I actually wanting to start the imperial nut brown kit but concerned it's going to have too much of that hoppy kick like an ipa which I really can't stand. Any thoughts?
 

Baja_Brewer

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Mark my words: the IPA craze is over. Its all about Belgians now. Sours in particular.

IPAs will always be around and good ones will be highly rated, but they're no longer going to be the "thing".
 

Ridire

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Mark my words: the IPA craze is over. Its all about Belgians now. Sours in particular.

IPAs will always be around and good ones will be highly rated, but they're no longer going to be the "thing".
I don't see that happening. IPA is not a fad. The others are gaining ground, but there is a sizable population of beer drinkers who have become to IPA what my grandfather was to BMC..."those other beers for ladies and such...".
 

Baja_Brewer

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I don't see that happening. IPA is not a fad. The others are gaining ground, but there is a sizable population of beer drinkers who have become to IPA what my grandfather was to BMC..."those other beers for ladies and such...".
I guess I should have been a bit more careful with my phrasing. They're not the "thing" because they're here to stay- no longer a craze. Others will gain traction and spur crazes, but IPAs at what they are.
 

Ridire

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I guess I should have been a bit more careful with my phrasing. They're not the "thing" because they're here to stay- no longer a craze. Others will gain traction and spur crazes, but IPAs at what they are.
That I agree with. IPA's will probable lose shelf space from here.
 

Natdavis777

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I wish my local Crown Liquor was like the one I used to live by on the southside. The freezer extended the length of the store of all micro, and the shelves were divided into regions. The variety was unreal, and the access I had to certain sours was awesome. The one I live by now isnt bad, but I still find it a chore to fine some Bacchus or some Cuvée Des Jacobins...
 

headbanger

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Mark my words: the IPA craze is over. Its all about Belgians now. Sours in particular.

IPAs will always be around and good ones will be highly rated, but they're no longer going to be the "thing".
Sours suck, talk about a fad, at least hops taste good.
 

bobbrews

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For what it's worth, the IPA is the most hated and misunderstood beer styles among the newer beer drinkers, or those who are too ignorant to give it a proper chance.

The main reason is because Bitterness is one of the last flavors we learn to appreciate. Couple this with extreme dryness, and it's an even harder cycle to break out of.

As kids, we despise bitter foods; give us a candy bar and a chocolate milk instead. As we become adults, we usually, but not always, become less fussy about the foods we eat. But if we do not decide to explore, culinary-wise, then our palates will never grow.

The IPA is not like cilantro, where there is claimed to be a pretermined dislike; some taste soap, others taste herbal citrus. The IPA is not like mushrooms or fish, where there is a textural issue, or a propensity to become smelly or slimy. There is no reason to dislike IPAs other than you have not given them the proper chance. The same goes for Scotch, Tequila, or Gin. These are acquired tastes you are dealing with. Rarely does anyone love them the first couple times they try them.
 
OP
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clintandhisbeer

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For what it's worth, the IPA is the most hated and misunderstood beer styles among the newer beer drinkers, or those who are too ignorant to give it a proper chance.

The main reason is because Bitterness is one of the last flavors we learn to appreciate. Couple this with extreme dryness, and it's an even harder cycle to break out of.

As kids, we despise bitter foods; give us a candy bar and a chocolate milk instead. As we become adults, we usually, but not always, become less fussy about the foods we eat. But if we do not decide to explore, culinary-wise, then our palates will never grow.

The IPA is not like cilantro, where there is claimed to be a pretermined dislike; some taste soap, others taste herbal citrus. The IPA is not like mushrooms or fish, where there is a textural issue, or a propensity to become smelly or slimy. There is no reason to dislike IPAs other than you have not given them the proper chance. The same goes for Scotch, Tequila, or Gin. These are acquired tastes you are dealing with. Rarely does anyone love them the first couple times they try them.
If that's the case then why do most beginner craft drinkers choose IPA?
 

bobbrews

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If that's the case then why do most beginner craft drinkers choose IPA?
They don't. In my experience, they typically resort to very easy drinking, malty, and balanced beers such as Summer Blondes, Ambers, Pilseners, Hefe's, Wit's, and other pale Belgians. And if they are really green behind the gills, they say something like: "I don't like Ales, I like Lagers. Shock Top and Blue Moon are the best!!" ... <--- Both ales by the way.

They might be more discussion about IPAs because they don't understand them, are intrigued by them, or have highly opinionated thoughts about them. If a new craft beer drinker actually enjoys IPAs, they tend to give Dogfish 60 or 90 Minute as an example of the best out there.
 

divrguy

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Why would anyone be annoyed at the best beer ever! Lol
 

Kevin79

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Love a good crisp and clean IPA. Stone IPA always sticks out to me as a good standard. Though at heart I am more of a malty guy.

The only thing I have against the IPA hop craze is that making hoppy beers has become so normal that now beers marketed as being pale ales are actually IPAs, marketed IPAs are actually 2x IPAs and so on. There was a good article I read online a while ago that interviewed a craft brewmaster who pretty much said the exact same thing. I can't remember where I found it though.
 
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The IPA is not like cilantro, where there is claimed to be a pretermined dislike; some taste soap, others taste herbal citrus. The IPA is not like mushrooms or fish, where there is a textural issue, or a propensity to become smelly or slimy. There is no reason to dislike IPAs other than you have not given them the proper chance.
Well, actually....

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25257701

Or, in English ;)

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/20...le-ale-a-love-of-bitter-may-be-in-your-genes?
 

Glasscloud

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I always thought IPA is what "started" the whole craft brewing thing. If there was any "craze" now I would say that would be barrel aged beers. Which I don't mind because those are my favorite.
 

DoWBrewer

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I love IPAs, but I am sick of every brewing company making the same IPA. Too much amarillo and simco imho. They are mostly bad copies of Pliny the Elder. I love it when I find a brewery with new and unique hop combinations.
 

Qhrumphf

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I always thought IPA is what "started" the whole craft brewing thing. If there was any "craze" now I would say that would be barrel aged beers. Which I don't mind because those are my favorite.
I'd put it on SNPA. Which is definitely more hop forward than that which came before it, and then the "if some is good then more is better" thing kicked in. But 10 years ago i don't remember IPAs being as big as they are now.
 

bobbrews

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And that doesn't prove anything other than hint toward a slight correlation that palates, in general, are more inexperienced the younger we are. This weak "study" attempts to theorize taste perception for everyone in the world by "testing" 93 Caucasian "young adults".

In the fine dining industry, I see palates change all the time. Trust me, anyone's palate can be trained to enjoy previously hated foods and flavors with enough time/experience/exposure to those items. I've even noticed this with mushrooms, fish, and cilantro, which are often hated more because they are improperly used/incorrectly cooked vs. a genetic predisposition, which if true, we are able to overcome in time.

There are well made IPAs out there as well as a huge sample of average and poorly made IPAs. To completely write them off because of an inexperienced palate or improper use of the ingredient the first couple times you tried it is a rather ignorant move. That is my main point.
 
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