Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > 6th batch in. Transfer/ Dry Hop questions?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-08-2013, 07:58 PM   #11
flatlanderHQ
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 74
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts

Default

General rule is to primary for a max of three weeks, then bottle.Oa beers will be down in 10 days. If dry hopping, use a secondary. Dry hopping is usually in the 3-5 day range. I usually dry hop for about 3, cold crash for two at 10F then bottle. The hops settle out perfectly. No need for annoying bags of hops in the secondary which can be a pain to remove.

__________________
flatlanderHQ is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-08-2013, 09:02 PM   #12
duboman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Glenview, IL
Posts: 5,997
Liked 452 Times on 421 Posts
Likes Given: 201

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zrab11 View Post
Thanks for all the advice so far.

I got a lot of Questions answered but one I don't feel like was answered was this one.

OK. So if I decide to transfer I should wait till the beer has reached final gravity correct??

Now if that is the case. How do I keep testing the beer throughout its fermentation process without exposing it to a bunch of air? Or is lifting the bung and airlock off to stick my wine/beer thief in ever few days not going to be enough time to mess with the beer??

Is this where a Racking Cane and rubber carboy topper would come in handy so I could jut keep taking samples without opening the carboy up or not??

Thanks for your help!
Yes, if you decide to use a secondary then you rack the beer once it has reached final gravity

You really only need 2 samples, the first around day 10, the second around day 14 (This is a general guess from my experience of 150-200 batches) Some beers may take longer but not usually.

As long as your thief is clean and sanitized it's not a big deal. In fact I will occasionally simply plop the hydrometer in the beer once sanitized, if I'm being lazy
__________________
Nothing Left to do but smile and drink beer.....

The Commune Brewing Company-Perfecting the "art" of beer since 2010
duboman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-08-2013, 10:25 PM   #13
justkev52
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: West Valley City, Utah
Posts: 265
Liked 31 Times on 29 Posts
Likes Given: 587

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zrab11 View Post
Thanks for all the advice so far.

I got a lot of Questions answered but one I don't feel like was answered was this one.

OK. So if I decide to transfer I should wait till the beer has reached final gravity correct??

Now if that is the case. How do I keep testing the beer throughout its fermentation process without exposing it to a bunch of air? Or is lifting the bung and airlock off to stick my wine/beer thief in ever few days not going to be enough time to mess with the beer??

Is this where a Racking Cane and rubber carboy topper would come in handy so I could jut keep taking samples without opening the carboy up or not??

Thanks for your help!
Wait 2 weeks before opening the fermenter. No need to test it before that.
__________________
justkev52 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-08-2013, 11:16 PM   #14
LovesIPA
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 1,460
Liked 198 Times on 150 Posts
Likes Given: 134

Default

The reason that there is no clear answer on certain subjects - like use of a secondary - is that it depends on a lot of different factors and each set of factors is unique. Equipment (maybe not so much in this example), style of beer, brewing technique, tastes, experiences, etc. all play into what makes a solution ideal for one brewer but less so for another.

Also, brewing science itself is constantly evolving as more research is performed on yeast and hops.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zrab11 View Post
When to transfer my beer from a primary to a secondary?
If you're going to transfer it, you have to wait until the beer reaches final gravity. Taking it off the yeast cake prematurely can lead to off-flavors and stuck fermentations.

I don't secondary. My personal take on it is that it provides little to no benefit (based on my own experiences and others on HBT), and it introduces the possibility of oxidation and/or infection. Too many risks and too few benefits for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zrab11 View Post
- Here is my take. I don't want to open up my beer to chances of oxidation but I also know that there is a small chance if you leave it on the yeast cake too long that some proteins will leach back into the beer and possible cause some off flavors.
Plain and simple, you will never run into this at the homebrewing level.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zrab11 View Post
No I know I am not being very scientific about this and only changing one variable but i assume if i change 3 and my beers improves drastically I know all 3 needed to be changed.
Not necessarily. I'm all for improving brewing methods, but I like to make changes in a more scientific manner.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zrab11 View Post
Then how do you take samples of that to test with your hydrometer without opening your beer up to oxygen to take samples with your wine/beer thief or turkey baster( I have a 6.5 gallon glass carboy for primary)??
Just take the rubber cap off the carboy, dip the sanitized thief into the beer and take what you need for the sample. Don't worry about the minute amount of time the carboy will be exposed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zrab11 View Post
-Should I read up on cold crashing and Do this?? I have a fermentation chamber so I definitely can do this if this is recommended.
It's entirely optional. If you are concerned with the clarity, cold crashing will help.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zrab11 View Post
- 1 reason is the kits usually tell me too after 7 days
- I wash the yeast to use it as starters
- I want to clear out my primary carboy so i can brew more. As I only have 1 6.5 carboy and I have 2 5 gallon carboys.
Most of the kits have incorrect directions. You can still wash yeast if you don't secondary. Time to buy more fermenters! I really don't like glass carboys. They are heavy, slippery when wet, and potentially deadly when dropped. I use plastic fermenter buckets.

Quote:
- Next Question is when/how do you dry hop?
Here's what I do, which includes how long I ferment.

Three weeks for everything. This gives the yeast enough time to ferment and clean up. I'm not under any pressure to get beer out the door so it can sit a while and not hurt anything. I don't secondary unless I'm doing a fruit beer like raspberry wheat.

Near the end of the three weeks, I use a paint strainer bag stitched together and put a stainless steel fitting (you'll accumulate these, trust me) inside the bag to weight it down. Stainless is not going to give any metallic flavors otherwise commercial breweries wouldn't use them to ferment and brite in. Then I just rack the beer off the yeast cake and into the keg. I take a FG reading in order to calculate the ABV.

The bag can be a pain to get out of the carboy neck though. I also have the option of dry-hopping in the keg. If I do it this way, I leave the hops in the keg until it kicks. They don't last long enough around here to get any grassy flavors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by duboman View Post
Yup, I just toss those in too! If you put a hop bag/ nylons/ paint strainer bag over the racking cane when you transfer you filter everything out.
I've tried this and I must be doing it wrong. I've put the strainer bag on the end of the cane and on the output (not at the same time) and it just causes all kinds of problems for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post
The longer the beer sits on the yeast, the more damaged it gets (pressure from the height of beer).
This is a valid concern on the commercial level but as I said you will never see it with a 5 gallon batch. There just isn't enough pressure to cause the yeast any harm.
__________________

Immature: A word boring people use to describe fun people

LovesIPA is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-09-2013, 01:07 AM   #15
Calder
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 5,410
Liked 239 Times on 214 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LovesIPA View Post
I don't secondary. My personal take on it is that it provides little to no benefit (based on my own experiences and others on HBT), and it introduces the possibility of oxidation and/or infection. Too many risks and too few benefits for me.


Plain and simple, you will never run into this at the homebrewing level.
On one line you talk about avoiding oxidation, while on the next you say you can't get it on HB scale.

I believe it is very real. It is not a concern if you minimize disturbing the beer, but if you splash it around you are in real danger of introducing stale flavors.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LovesIPA View Post
This is a valid concern on the commercial level but as I said you will never see it with a 5 gallon batch. There just isn't enough pressure to cause the yeast any harm.
How do you support your position. I believe it does accelerate the decline in yeast health. I think White and Zainasheff mention it in their book too. I don't think either of us can provide evidence to say whether it does or not.
__________________
Calder is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-09-2013, 02:32 AM   #16
LovesIPA
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 1,460
Liked 198 Times on 150 Posts
Likes Given: 134

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post
On one line you talk about avoiding oxidation, while on the next you say you can't get it on HB scale.

I believe it is very real. It is not a concern if you minimize disturbing the beer, but if you splash it around you are in real danger of introducing stale flavors.
You misunderstood me. What it doesn't seem like you can get on a homebrewing scale is yeast autolysis.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post
How do you support your position. I believe it does accelerate the decline in yeast health. I think White and Zainasheff mention it in their book too. I don't think either of us can provide evidence to say whether it does or not.
There was a post on here a few months ago by a user who brewed and fermented a batch of beer and left it sit in primary and on the yeast for close to a year and it was fine.

I think it's a myth, just as much as "you gotta rack to secondary to get the beer off the yeast ASAP" turned out to be (a false) one.
__________________

Immature: A word boring people use to describe fun people

LovesIPA is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-09-2013, 02:34 AM   #17
emjay
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
emjay's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 12,694
Liked 1711 Times on 1600 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LovesIPA View Post

You misunderstood me. What you can't get on a homebrewing scale is yeast autolysis.

There was a post on here a few months ago by a user who brewed and fermented a batch of beer and left it sit in primary and on the yeast for close to a year and it was fine.

I think it's a myth, just as much as "you gotta rack to secondary to get the beer off the yeast ASAP" turned out to be (a false) one.
I didn't believe in autolysis either, until I left an apfelwein for a year, and experienced it. Several judges tried it and pointed it out too.

And this was at the 1-gallon scale. So yes, it's certainly possible, even for homebrewers. I make it a rule now not to exceed 6 months.
__________________
emjay is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-12-2013, 08:21 PM   #18
Denny's Evil Concoctions
Grande Megalomaniac
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Denny's Evil Concoctions's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: West Kelowna BC, Canada
Posts: 7,767
Liked 50 Times on 42 Posts

Default

For the most part, oxidation is over rated. It's not something on has to get super anal about. I mean, don't shoot it across the room into you bucket with a fire-hose, but don't get to worried about it either.

emjay; what temp was you apfelwein stored at? I've aged beer at celler temps for over a year on the lees.

__________________

I may not be an expert, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express........ 6 months ago.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/denn...9/#post1766281

http://groups.homebrewtalk.com/Tapro...ook_Repository

Denny's Evil Concoctions is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
large batch transfer from 50 feet+? jkovac Equipment/Sanitation 2 09-12-2012 06:00 PM
4th Batch, 1st AG - Water, BeerSmith, Batch Sparge Questions delucr Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 12-20-2011 12:50 AM
American Wheat: To transfer or not to transfer? Porterrific Fermentation & Yeast 7 09-21-2009 07:20 PM
secondary transfer questions & pics flyfishnc Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 9 03-10-2009 11:31 AM
wort chiller and water/wort transfer questions chemist308 Equipment/Sanitation 1 03-24-2008 01:33 AM



Newest Threads