What's your process for accurate BIAB mash temps?

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vance

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I wanted to mash at about 152 for my brew last night, but I royally ****ed it up. I usually keep gaining heat after I cut the flame on my burner, but last night I cut it off at about 155 and by the time I got my grain ready to pour in 30 seconds later, the water was reading 164. I added the grain, stirred it up, and it still read just north of 160. After leaving the lid off and stirring it I was able to get it down to 156, which was still higher than I wanted but I was on a time crunch and needed to continue with the mash.

What's your process for getting consistent and predictable temperatures after mashing in?
 

PsychoBiter

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Once we start getting 5 or so degrees from our strike temp we ramp down the burner. The water temp will still rise a bit after you cut your burner if on full blast, especially if you have a beefy burner like a Blichmann. They hold a lot of residual heat that will continue to heat the pot after flame is out.
 

cloudybrewer

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On addition to the above, start stirring constantly at 5 degrees away and hold the thermometer in the water til it reads desired strike temp. For me, full volume/no sparge with 7.5 gal water and 10 pounds of grain, I aim for 6 degrees above mash temp.
 

kh54s10

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When I do BIAB it is smaller batches on the stove so when I get to strike temperature I move the pot off the burner and dough in. I then close it up and put the pot in my pre heated, then turned off, oven at about 150 degrees. The temperature of the mash usually stays within 1 degree of where it was when I put the pot in the oven.
 
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vance

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Once we start getting 5 or so degrees from our strike temp we ramp down the burner. The water temp will still rise a bit after you cut your burner if on full blast, especially if you have a beefy burner like a Blichmann. They hold a lot of residual heat that will continue to heat the pot after flame is out.
This is what I tried to do, but it still went up a ton. I don't have a Blichmann, but I did have my burner opened up wide trying to heat the water quickly so I could finish faster. Maybe tomorrow I'll try slowing it down a bit. Do you cut the heat and then let it sit for a few minutes to see where it stabilizes?
 

shetc

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I use a Reflectix jacket. Heat to strike temp, turn off burner, put on jacket and then mash. Usually hit within a degree of mash temp.
 

applescrap

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You just get to know your setup over time. Iirc i heard bobby from brewhardware say that a little warmer is better. And i agree, you can always cool easily, but heating especially once grain is in can be tricky. A lot depends on where and how you store your grain. The grain temp, outdoor temp, etc...play a role. You were perfect in the above example and just had to stir down till you got to your desired temp. I use 170 for my 10g batches because i use two bags and it takes some time to get both bags filled with grain and doughed in.

If you think about the brew day, the grain, temps, time it takes to dough in and stir etc...i bet you can already kind of plan for what if anything to do next. If to hot just stir down to temp as mentioned. I plan for a solid 5 min stir. I like stirring it really well, i mean really well. I hold the cheap plastic mash paddle anchored against my chest with one hand and whip the bottom violently with the other. While kind of holding the bag a little shut too so i dont get splashed. If the burner stays warm i think that would be at least somewhat desirable to help hold temps as long as its not staying overly hot. I don't know why I keep insulating the kettle because I'm about certain that Mash temperature really doesn't matter or at least would be able to be perceived in a blind taste test. A hydrometer might measure a few points different.

A final thought is to add ice maybe or boiling water as a way to quickly adjust temp but will obviously mess with water volumes.
 

bfabry

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I just go over the strike temp, cut the burner, stir until it gets back down to strike temp and then dough in
 

LittleRiver

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I use a thermometer that has a remote probe and hi/lo temp alarms. I set the hi alarm for the strike temp, or a few degrees below. I do other things while the water is heating. When the thermometer beeps I kill the burner, stir to make sure the temp is stable and even, add the grains, then insulate the kettle. During the warm months it stays within 1 degree for an hour.

I use the Priceless calculator to determine temps and water volumes.
 

Soyben

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Same a bfabry go over temp a little and stir. When temp comes down dough in, this helps eliminate hot spots. Also use the priceless calculator.
 

RPh_Guy

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I overheat my strike water, remove from burner and insulate with blanket & towels.
Let it sit for a few minutes to stabilize, then I check temperature. If it's still too high I add ice cubes one at a time while stirring until desired strike temperature is reached, and then I dough in.
 

ong

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I often do small decoctions to raise temp during the mash, especially if I have a lot of adjuncts and need a longer mash time. I’ll pull out a couple of quarts of thick mash from the bag and bring it to the boil before adding it back in.
 
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I'll start stirring before strike temp just to make sure there are no hot spots. I'll cut the burner a couple degrees below strike temp and let it slowly ramp up and then dough in. Depending on the setup, I would rather err on the low side because I can always crank the burner on and get it up to temp.
 

iamwhatiseem

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As I get close to strike, I stir the pot quite often and turn the flame down to about mid burn.
Once a degree over or so, shut off the flame. Stir more...put the lid on while preparing grain to pour in.
Put in bag and pour grain in 3-4 steps to avoid balls.
By the time I do all of this, I get very close to target usually no more than a degree or two high which is fine.

Edit: I forgot to mention I remove the pot from the burner after shutting it off to prevent residual heat.
 
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