What did I cook this weekend.....

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Evilgrin

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Still have no found black vinegar either. But then all I really need to do is go into Dallas 30 minutes or so away and I can find it all I'm sure.
The most common one that is reasonably good is Gold Plum (Zhenjiang, or Chinkiang vinegar) in the yellow bottle. I believe its a 2yr aged black vinegar and they also offer a 3yr. Its the classic version made with rice and some wheat bran. Shuita (Shanxi vinegar) is not made from rice and its more uncommon outside China. A little more expensive too being aged 5yrs. There is also Sichuan vinegar called Baoning. Most commonly used in food from Chengdu and surrounding areas. Its wheat based.

IMO avoid nearly all black vinegar from Taiwan. I havent tried one yet with the same authentic taste. They add colorings and other stuff to all the ones ive seen.

Gold Plum and Hengshun black rice vinegar will more than likely be the most common in a good market. Better markets might even have some older Hengshun. They do offer a 6yr aged. Its rather pricey on Amazon.
 

AF1HomeBrew

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I picked a few zucchini the other day. I had more than i could use so i gave one to the neighbor lady. She brought back a nice hunk of zucchini bread!!!!

Man i love that stuff!!!!
I made two kinds the other day for the wife and her sister-in-law & brother-in-law. Lemon Zucchini Bread and Double Chocolate Zucchini Bread. Definitely good stuff, but with Zucchini you need to be ready with recipes to use them up. After awhile you realize you can only make so much bread.
 

Staestc

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OMG!!! This is the coolest toy I have ever bought if you leave out my trimaran! PID is keeping pellet feed rate and fan rate to keep temp within a few degrees of set point. Nothing to do but drink beer and watch for when to take it off. Sear box waiting for final reverse sear. This is just amazing. And I am doing steaks. Wait till I do a 12-16 hour brisket and see what I think then!!
 

S-Met

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Som Tom (papaya salad), Muu Sateh (pork satay), Naam Jim Sateh (peanut sauce), and Ajaat (cucumber relish). So aromatic and flavorful!

View attachment 691558

View attachment 691559
Looks like Thai style Som Tom.

I alternate between that and hmong style. Sometimes I use the ferment fish sauce - the really, really really stinky stuff. Not sure how its made, but my aunties' make it a couple times a year. They cook crab, shrimp and fish down into a nasty black sauce. Stinks beyond belief but oh so good. They only cook it outside over fire because it stinks something awful.
 

Staestc

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I'd love your recipe for this, Travis! Looks fantastic!
Sure, no problem. And yes, it's very good. My youngest daughter can't get enough of it!!

Best Homemade Giardiniera (doubled)– daringgourmet.com

Ingredients

  • 1 head cauliflower, chopped into small florets
  • 20 stalks celery, diced
  • 10 carrots, diced
  • 4 large red bell peppers, seeded and chopped
  • 2 cup sliced green pitted olives
  • 8 serrano peppers (or more according to heat preference)
Spices for EACH pint jar:

  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1/4 teaspoon red chili flakes (optional, for hot giardiniera)
  • 1/8 teaspoon celery seeds
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 clove garlic, cut in half
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
For the Brine:

  • 8 cups white wine vinegar (6%)
  • 8 cups water
  • 4 tablespoons kosher salt
Directions

  • Place the chopped veggies a large non-reactive pot or bowl. Pour 1/2 cup kosher salt over the vegetables and enough water to cover them. Let the vegetables soak in the salt water for at least 6 hours or overnight.
  • To prepare the jars, place the spices into each of the jars, reserving the garlic and olive oil until after the brine is added. (I like to make some jars hot and some mild by adding/omitting the red chili flakes).
  • Thoroughly rinse and drain the vegetables before dividing them up between the jars. Pack the vegetables in as tightly as you can. Place the garlic each jar.
  • To make the brine: Bring the water, vinegar and salt to a boil. Pour the boiling brine over the vegetables leaving a little more than 1/2 inch head space from the top. Pour the olive oil over the top. Wipe the rims with a wet paper towel and seal the jars.
  • If you plan on using the giardiniera within two weeks let the jars sit at room temperature for a day or two and then transfer them to the fridge. The flavor only gets better with time so wait at least 2-3 days before eating it. Will keep refrigerated for 2 weeks.
  • If you're canning the giardiniera for long-term storage, seal the jars with the lids and rims and prepare a boiling water bath. Boil the jars for 10 minutes. Carefully remove the jars and let them sit undisturbed for 24 hours before moving them.
If processed in the water bath, the giardiniera is best consumed within 6 months but will keep for at least a year.
 
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Sure, no problem. And yes, it's very good. My youngest daughter can't get enough of it!!

Best Homemade Giardiniera (doubled)– daringgourmet.com

Ingredients

  • 1 head cauliflower, chopped into small florets
  • 20 stalks celery, diced
  • 10 carrots, diced
  • 4 large red bell peppers, seeded and chopped
  • 2 cup sliced green pitted olives
  • 8 serrano peppers (or more according to heat preference)
Spices for EACH pint jar:

  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1/4 teaspoon red chili flakes (optional, for hot giardiniera)
  • 1/8 teaspoon celery seeds
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 clove garlic, cut in half
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
For the Brine:

  • 8 cups white wine vinegar (6%)
  • 8 cups water
  • 4 tablespoons kosher salt
Directions

  • Place the chopped veggies a large non-reactive pot or bowl. Pour 1/2 cup kosher salt over the vegetables and enough water to cover them. Let the vegetables soak in the salt water for at least 6 hours or overnight.
  • To prepare the jars, place the spices into each of the jars, reserving the garlic and olive oil until after the brine is added. (I like to make some jars hot and some mild by adding/omitting the red chili flakes).
  • Thoroughly rinse and drain the vegetables before dividing them up between the jars. Pack the vegetables in as tightly as you can. Place the garlic each jar.
  • To make the brine: Bring the water, vinegar and salt to a boil. Pour the boiling brine over the vegetables leaving a little more than 1/2 inch head space from the top. Pour the olive oil over the top. Wipe the rims with a wet paper towel and seal the jars.
  • If you plan on using the giardiniera within two weeks let the jars sit at room temperature for a day or two and then transfer them to the fridge. The flavor only gets better with time so wait at least 2-3 days before eating it. Will keep refrigerated for 2 weeks.
  • If you're canning the giardiniera for long-term storage, seal the jars with the lids and rims and prepare a boiling water bath. Boil the jars for 10 minutes. Carefully remove the jars and let them sit undisturbed for 24 hours before moving them.
If processed in the water bath, the giardiniera is best consumed within 6 months but will keep for at least a year.
Thank you, that sounds wonderful! Will have to give it a try!

I bet you could just straight ferment that too.
 

VApatriot

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This was last night, not over the weekend and unfortunately I don't have any pictures to include.

So, last night we made the 2 things in the links below with 4 grilled lamb chops seasoned only with salt and fresh ground black pepper and garlic sauce out of a jar on the side for dipping the meat.

The first one is eggplant Zaalouk, we used the skinny eggplants (my wife thinks they’re Ichiban eggplants because they are about 8-10” long and about 2-3” in dia.) we’re growing in a pot on the patio and tomatoes from the garden. We cut some pitas from the store into wedges for dipping. I can’t tell you enough about how freaking awesome this stuff is. Not hard to make at all, you need some basic ingredients like paprika, smoked paprika, cumin, cayenne, and of course garlic you can eat it cold or warm, we had it warm. I’m telling you it’s absolutely fantastic!!!

Smoky Eggplant Zaalouk

The second one is a simple green bean recipe that we made with green beans and tomatoes out of our garden. Green beans aren’t my favorite but it was also really good and not hard to make at all, definitely will be making this again. These two dishes went so well with the grilled lamb chops it’s not even funny. I know a lot of you are great cooks and enjoy really good homemade food so I had to share it with you all. Enjoy!

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/73470/greek-green-beans/
 
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I was going to have a crawfish boil but I didn't have enough to go round.View attachment 692149
LOL, now that was funny! We just bought a nice crayfish trap and can't wait to deploy it - but alas, the house remodel has taken extreme precedence over all else! Eventually it will be done and THEN - look out crawdads!
 

Brewbuzzard

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LOL, now that was funny! We just bought a nice crayfish trap and can't wait to deploy it - but alas, the house remodel has taken extreme precedence over all else! Eventually it will be done and THEN - look out crawdads!
I damn near broke my neck trying not to step on the little guy. He also came with his own garnish. Happy crawdad hunting. Prost
 
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Someday I want to go to Thailand just for the food!

In the meantime, Neua Naam Tok (beef with lemongrass, shallot, mint, and cilantro, in a key lime, fish sauce, chile, and lemongrass sauce), and Phat Khanaeng (Brussels sprouts stir-fried with garlic and chile in an oyster/fish sauce/soy/white pepper sauce).


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